Ripcord Arrow Rests
Antelope Hunting Success
Pronghorn
Contributors to this thread:
Tdvorak 30-Mar-19
wyobullshooter 30-Mar-19
Bou'bound 30-Mar-19
Tyler 30-Mar-19
Paul@thefort 30-Mar-19
midwest 30-Mar-19
Dale06 30-Mar-19
Paul@thefort 30-Mar-19
Paul@thefort 30-Mar-19
Shug 30-Mar-19
Deertick 30-Mar-19
nmarchr 30-Mar-19
Ermine 30-Mar-19
drycreek 30-Mar-19
Da White Shoe 31-Mar-19
Da White Shoe 31-Mar-19
Da White Shoe 31-Mar-19
Da White Shoe 31-Mar-19
Ziek 31-Mar-19
skull 31-Mar-19
Dale06 31-Mar-19
Ziek 31-Mar-19
skull 31-Mar-19
sitO 31-Mar-19
Ziek 31-Mar-19
drycreek 31-Mar-19
Ziek 31-Mar-19
rjlefty3 31-Mar-19
Cazador 31-Mar-19
sitO 31-Mar-19
joehunter 31-Mar-19
Charlie Rehor 31-Mar-19
GFL 31-Mar-19
skull 31-Mar-19
Fauntleroy 31-Mar-19
Ziek 31-Mar-19
rjlefty3 31-Mar-19
sitO 31-Mar-19
Ermine 31-Mar-19
Wayne Helmick 31-Mar-19
RD 31-Mar-19
cnelk 31-Mar-19
cubdrvr 31-Mar-19
cnelk 31-Mar-19
Ziek 01-Apr-19
Bob H in NH 01-Apr-19
TH55 03-Apr-19
t-roy 07-Apr-19
wildwilderness 07-Apr-19
Cazador 07-Apr-19
Boreal 07-Apr-19
Ambush 07-Apr-19
Scoot 07-Apr-19
Ziek 07-Apr-19
Cazador 07-Apr-19
Scoot 07-Apr-19
Cazador 07-Apr-19
Ambush 07-Apr-19
Ziek 07-Apr-19
Adventurewriter 07-Apr-19
Scoot 08-Apr-19
deerslayer 08-Apr-19
From: Tdvorak
30-Mar-19
What is your favorite way to hunt archery antelope and what do you think is the best tactic for killing an archery antelope?

30-Mar-19
Set a blind up on a waterhole they’re using. I’ve shot ‘em while they were standing next to the 30yd stake I’d placed earlier, and I’ve shot ‘em when they were standing 5’ from the window. It’s as close to “guaranteed” success as you can get.

From: Bou'bound
30-Mar-19
Over water is best. Decoying is favorite

From: Tyler
30-Mar-19
During the rut in blinds in an alfalfa field with a doe decoy out at 20 yards. watched several bucks each day mount the decoy.

From: Paul@thefort
30-Mar-19

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Yep, water hole
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Yep, water hole

From: midwest
30-Mar-19
I love hunting the antelope rut and trying to decoy. All day action and not weather dependent. Sitting in an easy bake oven blind in August is not for me but doesn't mean I'll never do it.

From: Dale06
30-Mar-19
I’ve arrowed three. Two by waterholes, 9 yards and 22 yards. And one at a fence crossing, 12 yards. If the weather is warm or hot, it’s hard to beat setting at a waterhole.

From: Paul@thefort
30-Mar-19

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
another way is over a winter wheat field, actually the pronghorn were eating the BineWeed. I bedded the buck decoy 10 yards away. This was prior to the rut.

From: Paul@thefort
30-Mar-19

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
small buck came in, ie, a good eater for sure.
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
small buck came in, ie, a good eater for sure.

From: Shug
30-Mar-19
I’ve taken them every way you can hunt them but I love out of a stand in a windmill. Visibility is so much better than a pit or pop up blind it’s cooler temperature wise as well

From: Deertick
30-Mar-19
There is no un-fun way to hunt pronghorn period. Do yourself a favor and just get a tag and go hunting.

From: nmarchr
30-Mar-19
Spot and stalk!

From: Ermine
30-Mar-19
Spot and stalk. But nice close shots over waterholes is fun too

From: drycreek
30-Mar-19
Never done spot and stalk, but decoying for the most fun, and water hole for the best success percentage.

31-Mar-19

Da White Shoe's embedded Photo
Da White Shoe's embedded Photo
I've hunted out of waterhole blinds a few times. If I had private land where I could leave a blind setup, I'd probably do it more. I've had some excitement using decoys, but I'm usually gone hunting elk right when the rut is best for decoys. I never had much luck with the bow until I found the right place... with the type of terrain needed for stalking. These are my four archery antelope... all spot and stalk.

31-Mar-19

Da White Shoe's embedded Photo
Da White Shoe's embedded Photo

31-Mar-19

Da White Shoe's embedded Photo
Da White Shoe's embedded Photo

31-Mar-19

Da White Shoe's embedded Photo
Da White Shoe's embedded Photo

From: Ziek
31-Mar-19

Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
"Sitting in an easy bake oven blind in August is..."

Nor is it necessary if you build a traditional sage blind. They look more natural, allow air flow so you're very comfortable relaxing in the shade, and the sage helps cover your scent.

From: skull
31-Mar-19
Are you guys on the blind all day ?

From: Dale06
31-Mar-19
Sometime you are in a blind all day. It’s kinda up to you. They can come to water or fence crossing at anytime.

From: Ziek
31-Mar-19

Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Depends how comfortable you make the blind. ;-)

The first two photos above (previous post) were at the same location. Those two bucks came in opening morning. I let them walk, and didn't see another pronghorn there for five days - dawn to dusk. The last photo was at this blind. We had two new pronghorn hunters with us. I put the first one in this blind hoping that guy would come in for him, (I had seen him in the area while scouting) and told him NOT to shoot the first goat in, unless it was big. He killed the first one in opening morning - sub P&Y. On day three, I put the other guy in the same blind with the same instructions - same result. I let it rest two full days, and headed there myself. He was the first one to come in for me, barely after sunrise.

From: skull
31-Mar-19
Interesting how they react to different setups I’m not sure if I can do it all day on a blind

From: sitO
31-Mar-19
5 days "dusk to dawn" without seeing a Pronghorn? Nope, sounds like prison.

Spot-n-stalk or get a decoy and hunt'm, trust me your adrenaline level will be off the charts!

From: Ziek
31-Mar-19
"I’m not sure if I can do it all day on a blind"

I guess I don't get that. 90% of hunting is pretty much doing nothing. If you don't have the patience, you really handicap yourself. Spot & stalk? - Most of the time, you sit there for hours picking apart the landscape - over and over and over... what fun! Then, most of the rest of the time is just hiking. Still hunting? - If you're doing it right, it's just like sitting in a blind, only you take a few steps now and then. A tree stand? - just like a blind, only you HAVE to sit very still. Just because you're not getting sweaty and physically doing something, doesn't mean you're not actively hunting. If there is one thing they all share, it's patience - waiting, and waiting, and waiting some more for the opportunity to act. I don't know how you can be a hunter, especially a bow hunter, without it.

From: drycreek
31-Mar-19
I've put in a few hours at 90* in a blind, but we normally go the 2nd or 3rd week of September, so I've sat when it's nice weather much more. I couldn't hack August in a blind.

From: Ziek
31-Mar-19

Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
sitO - To each their own, I guess. To me adrenalin drops off exponentially with increased distance over 20 yards. Twice that, and it's just another distant target. ;-) To me, close is more exciting than how I got there. Just because I didn't see any speed goats, doesn't mean I wasn't seeing anything. Lot's of critters visit water holes in dry country. Hunting is more than just about the kill. However, I did move to another spot and killed a nice goat after two days there.

From: rjlefty3
31-Mar-19
Ziek - do you normally set up those blinds in advance? I would think they'd react to something 'new' like this, although it is natural enough I could see being able to get away with it.

Spot and stalk for me - mainly because that's what I go west for! I spend enough time sitting in a stand around here waiting for something. I like to try and make it happen myself - can't beat the adrenaline rush, either!

From: Cazador
31-Mar-19
It's been proven sitting over an "Active" waterhole is your best chance at killing an antelope with a bow. But lets be clear here, sitting over a waterhole whether you kill an antelope or not is plain boring. One could say that many practiced archery techniques are quite boring.

In the end, you can "hunt" and most likely experience lower success rates, or you can employ many generally accepted archery techniques and up your success. The good thing is you can try both in the same hunt if needed.

From: sitO
31-Mar-19
I guess if it's all about just shooting, then a blind is good. Trust me you can get close crawling or popping up a decoy...sometimes closer than you may be prepared for. I've had a harem of doe's pass within 5yds either side of me, and several bucks chasing within 10yds...now that's exciting! Been within feet of rattlers, badgers, swift foxes, etc, and observed every type of raptor you can on the prairies. That's why I guess I couldn't sit in a tent out there, I need to be able to see it all if I can.

Pronghorn are most unique, you can hunt them all day as they're usually visible and the terrain often lends itself to approach(sometimes at literal ground level). I've had days with 6-8 stalks, and days with one or two, but never a day or even a half day without seeing them and being in pursuit.

From: joehunter
31-Mar-19

joehunter's embedded Photo
Went from green weed to green weed as I belly crawled in on this little buck and a group of does and fawns.
joehunter's embedded Photo
Went from green weed to green weed as I belly crawled in on this little buck and a group of does and fawns.
I have killed them in blinds, windmill stands, and spot and stalk all DIY. Fun anyway you do it! I consider my spot and stalk pronghorns some of my best trophy's! My first one, this little buck in the pic below, was a hopeless stalk in a 10 inch tall wheat stubble field on a solo hunt in SD many years ago. Some how after 2.5 hours I got with in 55 yards of him and 8 does and fawns. The thrill and satisfaction of this successful stalk and shot is still one of my fondest hunting memories.

31-Mar-19

Charlie Rehor's Link
Fun having them tight and plentiful!!!

From: GFL
31-Mar-19

GFL's embedded Photo
Eastern side of the BigHorn
GFL's embedded Photo
Eastern side of the BigHorn
I usually sit on trails heading to alfalfa. One of my favorite hunts each year.

From: skull
31-Mar-19
I have taken 3 pronghorn all spot&stalk, I just wanna trying something different, myths be easy on a blind I have 2 weeks booked one week in Montana One week in Wyoming

From: Fauntleroy
31-Mar-19
Feel the same way Sito does, but for me it's about patience or rather the lack thereof. I've killed 4 of them with my bow spot and stalk. I probably would have killed more if I could sit all day, but it's not something I grew up doing. For me, I thoroughly enjoy making mistakes stalking antelope because it allows me to learn in a target rich environment. Over the course of two decades chasing them with a bow I'd bet I've messed up well over 100 stalks to arrow those 4, but God bless it that was a lot of fun.

From: Ziek
31-Mar-19

Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
sitO. That's the point, it's NOT all about just shooting. That one example I gave was not only not normal, I was still enjoying my hunt. Normally, there are critters coming and going all day long. In fact, I killed a coyote on the third day of that sit (a scrawny little dog). I often let them walk and just take photos. Usually, several pronghorns a day come to the water hole. I enjoy watching all of them, whether I shoot or not, and I often don't. I've hunted pronghorns 8 times and killed 5 P&Y bucks. The 3 years I didn't kill was not because I couldn't have. I was looking for something bigger and enjoying just being there. Spot and stalk is also fun, as are all the other methods of hunting. But if that's what I did for pronghorns, the ONLY blind hunting I would do would be for turkeys. I enjoy using all methods, and let the quarry and situation, determine what works "best". I could crawl around in the hot sun all day, or relax in the shade and enjoy the show, knowing I already did my homework.

rjlefty3. We start scouting as soon as we draw the tags. Even though it's risky, and we've had water holes dry up on us before the season, we rough in the blinds about a month before the season starts. We finish them a week or two before opening day. We also bring a portable, in case we chose poorly. And that's another point. The vast majority of our hunting starts well before the season starts, with many scouting trips. We don't just show up and try to figure out where to set up a blind. The scouting, the work building blinds (and it's a LOT of work), the camping, and the watching in anticipation of what might come in, is what is fun. That's what makes DIY more fun than guided. I guess if ALL you're there for is to kill something, maybe it would be boring. The shot and kill is kinda anti-climatic. The result of all the fun leading up to it, and the END of the fun, except for the eating part. ;-)

From: rjlefty3
31-Mar-19
Thanks Ziek - I 100% with the scouting thing being critical for success. And that's why I asked - I unfortunately can't scout if/when I go living across the country. Not really feasible to pack a blind and bring it through the TSA so the brush blind seems like a great option. I usually like to be a bit more mobile anyway, but it's always nice to have a Plan B (and C and D) in case things don't work as planned!

From: sitO
31-Mar-19

sitO's embedded Photo
sitO's embedded Photo
sitO's embedded Photo
sitO's embedded Photo
I've killed a few too Ziek, but the question was "favorite way and best tactic" ...so decoying is my favorite, and I guess "best" is subjective. My last(top pic) took me less than an hour, and my first(top right second pic) took me 5yrs of trial & error. I'm hunting them in a state with less than 2k total in the herd, but I have access to some great ranches. They're my favorite animal to chase so far, and like you I truly enjoy watching and learning their ways. I just can't sit in a blind, not for turkeys either, and I've tried it so I know what it's like.

Good luck if you get to go Tdvorak...I think you'll enjoy the terrain, the sights & sounds, and the table fair!

Edit: Bottom left two on lower pic weren't killed by me.

From: Ermine
31-Mar-19
Spot and stalk. But nice close shots over waterholes is fun too

31-Mar-19
Haven't been in a tree stand in 15 years and have never been in a blind. You couldn't pay me to sit in one. Once I moved out to the western plains all I want to do is go see what's down in the next dry wash or over the next hill. That being said, blinds at water holes is undoubtedly the most productive. When it's on, decoying is a blast. Next is finding herds and figuring out how to get within recurve range and crawling eye level with the rattlesnakes and badgers. It's just personality. No wrong or right, just what you enjoy the most.

From: RD
31-Mar-19
Killed them by stalking, water and decoys. I enjoy watching the antics as they come in to a decoy even if I don't shoot so decoying is my favorite.

From: cnelk
31-Mar-19

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
Cattle at a water hole can be challenging

From: cubdrvr
31-Mar-19

cubdrvr's embedded Photo
On our ranch. Also good for deer.
cubdrvr's embedded Photo
On our ranch. Also good for deer.

From: cnelk
31-Mar-19

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
But those challenges can be overcome

From: Ziek
01-Apr-19

Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
No doubt, cattle can be a pia. In the past we've tried slingshots (didn't work), and chasing them out (creating more commotion than it was worth). They usually don't stay too long anyway, so we just ignore them. Years ago, we did start putting up barbed wire around any blind. Damn cattle love to scratch on them, often damaging them, and even try to get inside for some shade. Once my wife had a big old bull stop right at the corner of her blind and let loose a river, that flowed into the blind. Good scent cover I guess. :-(

From: Bob H in NH
01-Apr-19
After moving from NH and spending hours and years sitting in a tree quietly waiting for a deer to wander by, we've moved to WY, I have full expectation to TRY and sneak up on one of these guys with my bow, probably using a decoy, and also have full expectations to fail, but have fun :-)

From: TH55
03-Apr-19

TH55's embedded Photo
TH55's embedded Photo
what brand/style decoy (s) would you recommend and why?

I’m a semi nubie to antelope, took first and only one last year in CO on a ranch using a Montana decoy. Hunted water 2 days only saw one 75 yards, this blind was set up near some green grass.

I’ve bowhunt whitetails stalking when the terrain is favorable but some of the vids I see for lope would freak me out with ZERO cover??? The place in CO had lots of short scrub bushes of some kind so it might would worked trying to slip in on them. It was intertaining to watch him as he “checked out” the decoy.

From: t-roy
07-Apr-19
Dang, GFL! It must have been really hot that day!!

Has anybody had any success with using a cow decoy?

07-Apr-19
Favorite way- ground blind- tried spot and stalk but I don’t like the country plus they are so jumpy and have amazing eyes I watched a few dodge my arrow. I don’t mind a long sit with a cooler full of ice and food and a good book. But the main reason I like a blind is the success rate is so high and killing one to me is fun!

By far the best tactic is to find the only water for miles and put on a good blind.

From: Cazador
07-Apr-19
I’ve done the blind thing many times but It’s hard for me to really call that hunting.

If you think about it, taking a book or an iPhone with extra batteries just to make it through the dayshould tell us something.

It is the most deadly method, but it comes at a price.

From: Boreal
07-Apr-19
Laying in wait for an opportunity to ambush your quarry isn't hunting? Damn! You learn something new every day!

From: Ambush
07-Apr-19
Cazador, does that include tree stands or field edges or a dip by a well used trail??

From: Scoot
07-Apr-19
Apparently if you "don't do it the way I like to do it", it ain't huntin.

Just curious- is sitting in a treestand waiting for deer hunting?

From: Ziek
07-Apr-19
At least when they come to water, they're wide awake. Not like spot and stalk, when you try to kill something that is asleep, or calling, when he's all hyped up on hormones. How dare you take advantage of their daily needs. ;-)

From: Cazador
07-Apr-19
Ambush, we both know there is a difference.

You’re in a blind, fully enclosed and for all intents and purposes 100 percent concealed. I suppose those shooting houses are the same but I wouldn’t call that a tree stand persay.

There is a big difference between waiting on a crittter on the termination of a stalk, or that dip in the landscape vs sitting in a blind, book in hand, flipping pages. I’m pretty sure on the termination of a stalk on that bedded buck, or sheep, in order to pass time you wouldn’t put your headphones in, or read chapter 2 of “the old man and the sea”

Again, im not saying it’s wrong but call it what it is. Effective, but boring as hell.

From: Scoot
07-Apr-19
Caz because you find something boring doesn't mean others feel similarly.

I love watching golf. Many hate it and liken it to watching paint dry. Who is right? Nobody, which is why it's called an opinion. Stating an opinion as if it's a fact doesn't make it so.

From: Cazador
07-Apr-19
Scoot,

I thought I gave an opinion?

This is a message board and I stated my opinion you can be the Judge of the facts.

If i said Blonde chicks are better than Brunettes, like above, that’s an opinion but I guess some would take offense to that as well.

From: Ambush
07-Apr-19
Well, I’ve sat in treestands and blinds for ten hours many, many times. And at the end of the day my ass couldn’t tell the difference.

From: Ziek
07-Apr-19
"...call it what it is. Effective, but boring as hell."

You call it boring, I call it patience. Something every good hunter either has or develops. Most of spot and stalk is the spotting part. Talk about boring. At least from a blind I can do photography. ;-)

07-Apr-19

Adventurewriter's embedded Photo
Adventurewriter's embedded Photo
I find water whole blind hunting exciting when they are coming into you......maybe...... wound tighter than a banjo

From: Scoot
08-Apr-19
Caz, you won't offend me- I'm not the sensitive type.

Blondes better than brunettes... I think we can all agree that's just a universally agreed upon fact, can't we? Hahaha

From: deerslayer
08-Apr-19
I like to run and gun. Having lots of permission or public land access is key. Drive till you spot some. I like to park and glass them up. If they're in a good, stalkable spot it's on! If not I keep going. Nice thing about this method is if you blow the stalk, which happens way more often than not, you can keep moving till you find more and keep working at it. I find each year I may try 20 times with 20 failures, but if I'm successful on the 21st than it's all worth it.

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