Black Gold Sights
conifers and herbicides
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Killbuck 15-Apr-19
Corn bore 15-Apr-19
Corn bore 15-Apr-19
Corn bore 15-Apr-19
cath8r 15-Apr-19
CAS_HNTR 15-Apr-19
Killbuck 16-Apr-19
Mark Watkins 16-Apr-19
skookumjt 16-Apr-19
blue spot 16-Apr-19
BullBuster 16-Apr-19
CAS_HNTR 16-Apr-19
skookumjt 16-Apr-19
BullBuster 16-Apr-19
Ollie 16-Apr-19
Treefarm 16-Apr-19
Treefarm 17-Apr-19
BullBuster 17-Apr-19
blue spot 17-Apr-19
Indianaforester 18-Apr-19
Indianaforester 16-Jun-19
From: Killbuck
15-Apr-19
My sons planted 150 seedling white oak and various pines around the perimeter of a couple of my hay fields. Can I spray Clem on them to keep the weeds down? Don't really want to mow to keep them from getting choked out.

From: Corn bore
15-Apr-19
Conifers are quite tolerant roundup but I think I would spray around the trees not over them. The oaks you will definitely have to spray around. I have sprayed roundup around thousands of trees with good results as long as you don't hit to many leaves. It is imperative ,with small trees, to spray while the weeds are shorter than the trees. It's ok to hit the trunk with spray but not the leaves.

I see on that on the clethodin label that conifer and dedacious are tolerant. I have no experience using it with trees and it only kills grass and leaves the broadleaves.

When we planted trees we would till between the rows and hand wand spray roundup in the row between the trees. We also sprayed and incorporated treflan between the rows to get the grass out.

The key is to not let the weeds get away from you for the first few years. You have to be diligent or the weeds will overwhelm the trees.

From: Corn bore
15-Apr-19

Corn bore's embedded Photo
Corn bore's embedded Photo

From: Corn bore
15-Apr-19

Corn bore's embedded Photo
Corn bore's embedded Photo

From: cath8r
15-Apr-19
I was told by a local farmer that the 'safe' herbicides wouldn't really kill conifer trees but stunt the growth...

From: CAS_HNTR
15-Apr-19
I'd be careful on any newly planted trees.....they are pretty sensitive their first year or two. I wouldn't spray anything right on them. Hate to go through all of that work to kill them.

Feel free to spray Gly, but keep at least 1 ft away and don't spray on windy days. Ask me how I know.

From: Killbuck
16-Apr-19
Thanks guys!

From: Mark Watkins
16-Apr-19
I'd certainly error to the side of caution on newly planted trees.

Mark

From: skookumjt
16-Apr-19
Clethodim doesn't control weeds. The better choice would have been to spray with the right chemical with residual prior to planting.

From: blue spot
16-Apr-19
Hello, I have no experience with the CLETHODIM but others comments are accurate as far as the other herbicides. Any seedling will be very tender and susceptible the first year or so until they are well established. Softwoods are pretty tolerant to glyphosate, especially at the end of the growing season, after mid august here in Maine and New Hampshire. Oak have very low tolerance to glyphosate, similar to grass. Glyphosate only enters the plant through the foliage so no issue if it hits the stem. Glyphosate works by starving a plant to death. As the plant makes energy by photosynthesis the energy is not converted and stored in the roots. So in spring and early summer it is hard to starve a plant while it is in the midst of peak photosynthesis. It works OK in the beginning of the summer on smaller less established plants with small root reserves like grass. If you increase the concentration enough it will work but your not using the product to it's best advantage. It works best in late summer or more specifically when the plant physiology switches over to producing seed. The plant needs to continue to grow unmolested for at least a week and longer is better for it to translocate the herbicide throughout and for the chemical to be processed through the plant to act on whatever the mode of action is for the specific herbicide.

My pet peev is listening to people say they are "burning down" weeds or what ever they are treating. Maybe others would have more success with chemicals if we all used more accurate descriptions.

If I had a modest number of hardwoods I wanted to succeed I would use tree tubes to protect from browsing and mulch mats. I have seen seedlings planted with the tubes and they grow at least 2-3 times as well as seedlings without the tube. I also know you need to put a screen over the top of the tube to keep bird and bee nests out. The tubes and mulch mats are not cheep but I am confident they would give you good success.

Yes, I am a forester and master pesticide applicator in Maine and New Hampshire.

From: BullBuster
16-Apr-19
Good stuff guys. Blue spot I have problems with yellow jackets building nests in my tree tubes. Is that really a problem? If so, will bee spray not hurt the trees? Chestnuts. Thx

From: CAS_HNTR
16-Apr-19
Bullbuster..........I just go through each spring and sprinkle Seven Dust in the top of my tubes to prevent wasps, bugs, etc. Works well and doesn't hurt trees.

From: skookumjt
16-Apr-19
Blue-that is not at all correct. Glyphosate can be used for basal treatment. It is not at all effective late in the season when plants have matured. It is most effective on young, actively growing plants.

From: BullBuster
16-Apr-19
Perfect. Thx

From: Ollie
16-Apr-19
Labels are provided on pesticide formulations for a reason. Read the labels before using if you are uncertain whether a particular plant will be damaged.

From: Treefarm
16-Apr-19
Haven’t read all the posts here.

You want to use simazine (Princep 4L). It is a long-acting preemergent herbicide that you can spray directly over seedlings, even when they have leaves. It will keep grasses down for 1-2 years, longest on sandy soils. I use 1.25quarts in 5 gallons water in a fine mist sprayer. It is soil active, larger molecule and needs a rain to wash onto soil.

Edit: Simazine works great with raspberries too. It keeps grasses out very well.

From: Treefarm
17-Apr-19
TTT so this can help others planting this spring. I have plenty of tips for getting a high survival success on new plantings if anybody needs help.

From: BullBuster
17-Apr-19
I planted some more chestnuts and going to plant peaches and cherries next week. Love any tips. Intrigued by Simazine. Can it be used on perennial food plots too to keep everything under control?

From: blue spot
17-Apr-19
Ollie is 200% right the label is the law !! Now you also need to understand every label is made with the help of many lawyers. The directions are intentionally broad so as not to hem in the maker or applicator on liability. In reality this allows an applicator the most latitude in how they use the product. Good for someone with knowledge on how the product works. But for a novice it does not give them real specific directions. Skookumit, label universally says to apply to actively growing plants when using a foliar application. My belief is that this means one with green leaves. I assure you glyphosate is most effective and efficient later in the growth cycle. It can be used effectively at earlier stages of growth but it is not as effective as later. Grass and annual weeds are far easier to kill than a shrub, tree or vine with large root reserves. How are you using the term "basal treatment" ? Do you just mean treating under another plant ? In the industry that means applied directly to the stem of the shrub, vine or tree usually in an oil or diesel fuel mix so the pesticide is absorbed into the plant. You can apply both herbicides and insecticides using this method. Garlon, active ingredient triclopyr , is basal applied this way to control shrubs, saplings and vines. Glyphosate can be applied to the recently cut stump but this is not what we are talking about. As was also mentioned, you can wipe the herbicide on the target plants so as to avoid contact with what you want to save The best time to kill the competing vegetation is before you plant so you can apply without the need to be careful ! I don't remember the exact reason the birds and bees were a problem in the tubes but the solution was simply some onion bag netting secured over the top with a rubber band. Maybe the bees were just an inconvenience and mentioned in the same conversation. I do remember that the hardwoods would grow out of the tube in 2 growing seasons where they would take 3 or 4 to grow that tall without it. It would put the seedling beyond browsing height pretty fast.

18-Apr-19
I spray over the top before the trees start growing. Do this prior to bud break or any elongation of the pine. I use Oust and glyphosate. This is a pre and post emergent mix giving 60-90 days of weed free. Some plants will come in during late summer but by then your trees will have put on most all their growth. I spray this on thousands of trees every year for my clients. Be sure to follow the label of any herbicide that you use.

16-Jun-19
I spray over the top before the trees start growing. Do this prior to bud break or any elongation of the pine. I use Oust and glyphosate. This is a pre and post emergent mix giving 60-90 days of weed free. Some plants will come in during late summer but by then your trees will have put on most all their growth. I spray this on thousands of trees every year for my clients. Be sure to follow the label of any herbicide that you use.

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