Moultrie Products
Hard takedown travel bowcase?
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
scndwfstlhntng 06-May-19
altitude sick 07-May-19
JTreeman 07-May-19
mgmicky 07-May-19
elkstabber 07-May-19
altitude sick 07-May-19
Treeline 07-May-19
Linecutter 07-May-19
stagetek 07-May-19
fisherick 07-May-19
scndwfstlhntng 07-May-19
scndwfstlhntng 07-May-19
elkstabber 08-May-19
elkstabber 08-May-19
Tilzbow 08-May-19
Treeline 08-May-19
bowonly 08-May-19
Treeline 08-May-19
Treeline 09-May-19
mgmicky 09-May-19
Tradmike 12-May-19
06-May-19
Guys, I need to get a new hard bowcase for my takedown recurve. I have an old plano case with old fashion fold over /keyed locks but that just won't do anymore ( I haven't used it for 20 years as I have been using a one piece longbow case for most trips. I am not likely to use it for more than one or two trips but will be to Africa this summer. I do not want to spend a lot for it , but maybe the best idea would be to sell used in a year or so.

I see that the Pelican V700 looks like the only reasonable one to consider. Any reasonable suggestions other than that?

Thanks Steve

07-May-19
Try to fit it in a full size suitcase. With clothing wrapped around it. Zero hassle at customs or security. I just flew back into Atlanta from Joberg the 1st of May. An over zealous airport security employee directed All the bow cases into the secure area to be inspected. There was Even a guy with a small 30” hard pelican case with camera equipment in the line. So all rifle hunters and bow hunters had to wait as one at a time we went in to open our bow or rifle case and confirm proper forms were correct. Luckily :40 later a more seasoned employee came and pulled all the bowhunters out into a separate line. (Bows normally do not get checked) They still Had to be checked because they were in that room but we had a little faster line. The long winded point I’m trying make is. If possible don’t use any sort of rifle OR bow case. I used an elevation jet stream soft case for long ATA target bows on that trip. That was a mistake too. If it didn’t go into the rifle area, it was in the oversized baggage claim area. They didn’t charge over size fee but it had to go in that claim area. An extra hassle on a long trip for no reason. My wife’s Excalibur crossbow was taken down and easily packed in a suitcase. Zero hassle. Grab it and go. The Sitka Nomad or Badlands Terra Glide is about the longest case that will come out on the regular baggage claim carousels these days.

From: JTreeman
07-May-19
For a take down bow you have soooooooo many choices. As altitude sick has stated many manufactures offer regular hardsided or hybrid luggage that will work great and be totally incognito. If you are looking for archery specific cases check out Lancaster archery they have a bunch of options for takedown and targets stuff that will probably work for you. I just bought a new travel case from Legend who have a bunch of options as well (many of which are on Lancaster).

—Jim

From: mgmicky
07-May-19
I agree with Altitude-if it’s a 3 piece, try to put it in a suitcase. My 2 piece longbow won’t fit in a suitcase, so I bought the same Pelican you mentioned and it’s built like a tank but definitely looks like a weapons case. Another option to look at is the Far North cases. I don’t have their takedown case, but I do have the 1 piece longbow/recurve case. They are basically a PVC pipe covered in heavy nylon and come in different lengths/circumferences.

From: elkstabber
07-May-19

elkstabber's Link
I try to avoid anything that makes TSA want to search me or my luggage. I use the MTM arrow case (see link). I use one for the arrows and one for the bow. By removing the foam I can fit the riser and two limbs in the case. Each of the limbs and the riser can be slipped into cheap cotton tube socks, which protect them. The TSA people that have searched were always more interested in the arrows than the bow. One time I had cedar arrows with glue on broadheads and the TSA woman wanted to check the sharpness of the broadheads. When I asked her why her boss came over and said everything is okay and the search was over. My point is that TSA searches are never good and should be avoided. The cases are long so you will need a 36" long duffel to put them in.

07-May-19
Steve, Also be aware that Joberg now requires that at least one side of the bag must be rigid. No round soft duffles. The handles were jamming the conveyors

From: Treeline
07-May-19
I have packed take down recurve bows in luggage a lot for international travel.

I slide the limbs into a bow sock so they can be pressed together (top to bottom). The first one in recurve tip down and the second one in recurve tip up then fold the sock so they are not contacting each other. Then slide the handle in. I will put the bolts, Allen wrench and string in a zip lock and slide it in with the handle. Then tie up the sock ends around the handle and limb sections. I always take an extra set of limb bolts, extra Allen wrench, and spare string that has been tuned in a separate bag in the suitcase.

More complex than a 2-piece longbow, but still not too extravagant. The recurve package in a bow sock will be smaller than a 2-piece longbow and easier to get into a suitcase.

I typically put my arrows in a tube with broadheads removed and then put the broadheads in a separate hard case in the luggage.

Have not had TSA search much unless I was bringing back jars of food or other stuff. They don't seem to even pay attention to bows and arrows.

From: Linecutter
07-May-19

Linecutter's Link
This is a soft takedown bow case, with sleeves for the limbs, that would lay pretty flat in a suitcase and pack clothes over it. They actually work pretty well. DANNY

From: stagetek
07-May-19

stagetek's embedded Photo
stagetek's embedded Photo
I use a take down shotgun case.

From: fisherick
07-May-19

fisherick's embedded Photo
fisherick's embedded Photo
For domestic airline travel I just wrap the limbs and riser in a bow sock and surround with clothes in a duffle. No problem. I also have a MTM Arrow Case + that 1/2 half is foam to set riser and limbs in and other 1/2 half holds 12-18 arrows. Place clothes in bottom of HD canvas duffle, place MTM bow case and surround with more clothes.

07-May-19
Great and helpful answers. Thanks to everyone. It will definitely help me make a decision. It has always worried me that a soft suitcase would not protect the limbs well enough but multiple comments here are to the contrary. In addition my arrow case is too long for my current case. Most suitcases over 30" long are usually technically oversized and that also worries me from a cost and handling point of view, but you guys don't seemed too concerned about that . What is the largest suitcase length that I can get this done with? Thanks all Steve

07-May-19
I just looked at the Sitka Nomad. It is certainly "oversized" at 42 x16x14 = 72. How did those of you that have one get treated in regards to "oversized luggage" when trying overseas?

From: elkstabber
08-May-19
scndwfstlhntng - You saw my response above for traveling with a takedown recurve. It is much easier to take two recurves than one compound. Compounds are a pain to fly. But, since you asked about the Sitka Nomad you should also look at the Legend 44. It is about 44 x 14 x 8 = 66". Also oversized but just barely. It is specifically made to carry a compound bow. Half the price of the Sitka. I've used it to fly three (domestic) roundtrips this past year and it did the job perfectly. An oversized hard case is easy for a desk agent to measure. An oversized soft case is harder to measure and looks more like a normal piece of luggage so I think that the Legend was a good choice. My overseas travel was for work and not hunting so I can't answer how oversized luggage is treated overseas.

From: elkstabber
08-May-19

elkstabber's Link
Link for the Legend 44.

From: Tilzbow
08-May-19
Those oversized duffles listed above are only oversized if they’re completely full and someone at the airline check in counter actually measures it. Most airlines limit is 62” and they folks at the check in counter pay a lot more attention to the weight than the measurement. Worst case you’ll stuff it full and get charged for oversized baggage.

From: Treeline
08-May-19
Look into the difference flying first class/business class versus economy. Typically, you get extra bags, higher weight limits and less restrictions on baggage flying business class.

I had several one-piece longbows and recurves when the family moved down to Peru. I took one of the shorter round cases from 3-Rivers stuffed with arrows, one with take-down bows (and fly rods), and a 6' long PVC tube with the one-piece bows and some fishing rods. Took straps and strapped the 3 together and it counted as one bag.

I have travelled all over with one of the big fishpond bags. It is solid bottomed and soft sided with a lower zipper compartment that you can put wet stuff in or it is a great place for bows, arrows, or flyrod tubes. Never been charged extra for it unless it was over weight.

From: bowonly
08-May-19

bowonly's embedded Photo
bowonly's embedded Photo
I agree weight is the main issue when flying with a take-down recurve. That is why instead of the extra weight and unused space in a commercial arrow case, I just cut a 30 inch section of plastic drain pipe capped at both ends. Broadheads are separate in a small Tupperware container. It can hold two dozen arrows. A lot of weight savings over a much heavier commercially made case and cheaper, too. I just use a soft padded takedown bow case for the bow. Pack them in the middle of all those clothes in your luggage and you are good to go. For those who would be skeptical about the actual protection provided, I have traveled extensively using this set-up over the last 25+ years on all kinds of airlines with never an issue. The only exception was the overly excited Australia customs officer when flying right after 9/11. He thought he had a real live terrorist until his supervisor pointed out those broadheads were in my checked luggage!

From: Treeline
08-May-19

Treeline's embedded Photo
Treeline's embedded Photo
This is my hunting setup for traveling. The bow actually fits in the quiver and the broadheads in the case can fit in the quiver or in a checked bag. Really compact setup.

From: Treeline
09-May-19
The bow will fit in the quiver with the arrows.

I would keep an arm guard, couple of tabs and a spare shot-in string in the pouch.

Works excellent for horseback hunting. Just tie the quiver on behind the saddle and the broadhead case goes in a saddlebag. Safest way to keep from cutting yourself on a broadheads in a horse wreak.

When you get where you are going, take the bow out, snap together and brace it. Screw on your broadheads and you are ready in less than 2 minutes.

From: mgmicky
09-May-19
those are some great ideas Treeline

From: Tradmike
12-May-19
I put my TD bow and arrows in my rolling duffle bag. Never have any issues.

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