Moultrie Products
Food plot fencing ideas
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
lewis 26-May-19
Wishedhead 26-May-19
Kydeer1 26-May-19
t-roy 26-May-19
Single bevel 26-May-19
t-roy 26-May-19
LKH 26-May-19
t-roy 26-May-19
lewis 27-May-19
lewis 27-May-19
LKH 27-May-19
Mad Trapper 28-May-19
t-roy 28-May-19
Mike-TN 28-May-19
lewis 28-May-19
Mike-TN 28-May-19
lewis 28-May-19
Mike-TN 28-May-19
wildan 02-Jun-19
LKH 02-Jun-19
t-roy 02-Jun-19
LKH 02-Jun-19
LKH 02-Jun-19
LKH 02-Jun-19
LKH 02-Jun-19
t-roy 02-Jun-19
LKH 02-Jun-19
t-roy 02-Jun-19
BullBuster 25-Jun-19
Mike-TN 25-Jun-19
t-roy 25-Jun-19
t-roy 25-Jun-19
BullBuster 25-Jun-19
BullBuster 25-Jun-19
kauaihunta 12-Jul-19
Mike-TN 12-Jul-19
t-roy 12-Jul-19
LKH 12-Jul-19
Mike-TN 14-Jul-19
t-roy 14-Jul-19
Mike-TN 14-Jul-19
Mad Trapper 16-Jul-19
t-roy 16-Jul-19
t-roy 16-Jul-19
t-roy 16-Jul-19
Grubby 16-Jul-19
From: lewis
26-May-19
Looks like I’m going to have to fence my Real World soybeans this year. I pretty much know what to do but any suggestions would be helpful.Thanks Lewis

From: Wishedhead
26-May-19
In regards to those beans what kind of luck have u had with them. First time trying that variety. Ag fields all around me. I’m gonna plant 10 days later than the farmers hoping that will help with the pressure a bit

From: Kydeer1
26-May-19
I just put out the non typical fencing system to protect some beans. No ag around me so we'll see if it works out. Pretty slick system though and not crazy expensive.

From: t-roy
26-May-19
There’s several old threads on here with some good info for you, Lewis.

I just finished fencing off another one of my plots about an hour ago. Only 3 more to go!

From: Single bevel
26-May-19
I assume you are talking about an E fence, right? Gallagher makes a nice system, easy to put together, but you can do it cheaper. How large is the plot and is there any other beans planted very close nearby? The answers to those questions will dictate if you need a fence. I do an acre or so every year of stuff I could never establish without an E fence. I like mine but there are a few things I neglected to do in the beginning that made it a chore. Get a system and it will go much easier. My 1st tip...a reel for taking it down is mandatory. Dont think you can just wrap it up like clothesline. Use a reel or swear a lot.

From: t-roy
26-May-19
Single bevel X2 on the reel and putting it together yourself cheaper. I use old electrical spools for the reel. I drill a small hole at the outer edge of the spool and use a 5”-6” 1/2” carriage bolt for a reel handle. I’ve got a system rigged up on the bed of my Polaris Ranger, where I can spool up and unspool everything. I also use Turbo Tape for my outside strand, and 2 strands of Turbo Wire on the inside fence. When I spool it up in the fall, I spool both inside wires up together at the same time, then spool up the tape last. If you try and spool it all up at the same time, you end up with a tangled mess. I’d definitely recommend spooling it up in the fall. It will last longer vs just leaving it out over the winter (UV rays) It Eliminates the chance of deer getting tangled up it as well. If you have multiple plot fences, write on the spool which plot it is for. That way, when you get ready to unspool it the following year on the same plot, everything is already the correct length.

Another thing I would recommend doing is planting a 10’-15’ wide strip of clover around the perimeter of your plot, and running the fence along this strip. The clover reduces weed issues in your fence, yet rarely gets tall enough to short out your fence.

From: LKH
26-May-19
I've put up about 8-10 solar powered electric fences around tree plots of about 1.5 acres each. I use the two row method. Inner row 12" and 40" and the outer row about 28" placed 18" out. I use the heavy solid electric wire and had a device made to wrap the wire up so I can move it easily. I've had up to 3 miles out at times.

First plot was in 2000 and it kept the deer out very well. Mowing under the fence is a pain but worth it.

From: t-roy
26-May-19
I’m starting to transition over to the regular 18 ga. metal wire as well, LKH. At least for the outside strand. The biggest negative I’ve found so far is having to set and brace the corner posts vs just using tee posts for corner posts when using the Turbo type wire and tape. But, once I get them all set, I won’t have to do it again for a long time, hopefully! I’ll just push that wire down to the ground and leave it there, then just raise it back up the following spring. Is that what you do as well, Larry?

From: lewis
27-May-19
I have had great luck with this variety of beans not much in the way of Ag fields around me and no soybeans but last year they got pounded way too early and I but up to a 80 thousand acre wma Good luck Lewis

From: lewis
27-May-19
I will have 2 plots about an acre each

From: LKH
27-May-19
T-Roy, much of my fencing, once the shrubs/trees get big enough, is intended to keep the bucks from rubbing, something they do well into January. I keep the fences operating all winter but do sometimes disconnect the bottom wire when the snow gets high.

From: Mad Trapper
28-May-19
Went to T-posts for everything. One time expense. Using gallagher method, but some of my deer have learned to jump it. Went to four strands with one up high on the outside. Does don’t jump now but still have a couple of bucks testing it. We spray brush killer around it and then touch up with a weed eater from time to time. We got all of our corn and beans in this weekend and two fences up. Three more to install. Use cord reels to wind everything up when we pull them. Running out of room for the reels!

From: t-roy
28-May-19

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
You need bigger spools, Mad! ;-)

From: Mike-TN
28-May-19

Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Lessons learned: 1) Get spools big enough to store wire on when you take down the fence. Otherwise you will have a huge mess on your hands. 2). Get a solar charger that is more than what you need based on specs. 3). Common sense but keep sides of the plot straight and put up T post whenever you change directions. Use step in post for straight runs. 4). Don’t cut the power and leave the fence up... deer will make a mess of it. 5) use the extended plastic clips on the corner Tpost .... with the short ones the wire will often end up touching the post and grounding out.

From: lewis
28-May-19
Thanks for the info I really didn’t want to do this but it is now a necessity Lewis

From: Mike-TN
28-May-19

Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Mike-TN's embedded Photo
It is a bit of a pain but for me it has been a game changer. I have been fencing 1.5 acres but this year I added 3 more 1 acre plots. A lot more work and a decent amount of expense but worth it. Everyone will have their own way but what has worked well for me.... plant beans early May. Get the fence up immediately (within a week of planting). Spray when weeds start competing. Take fence down in July when beans are waist high. Deer will eat all leaves and bean pods during July and August leaving only stalks and a few leaves. Ahead of a September rain I broadcast wheat and radishes. Provides food source from July through the winter. The spool that works good for me is a speedrite jumbo reel. One for outside fence poly tape and one for 2 strands os braided wire on the inside fence. The solar charger I use is Patriot solar guard 155.... .15 joules. I tried smaller unit but it did not do well.

From: lewis
28-May-19
Mike that looks impressive thanks for the info we’re on the plateau close to Crossville Lewis

From: Mike-TN
28-May-19

Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Mike-TN's embedded Photo
We have clover all around the beans and it works well for keeping food available for most of the year. This pic shows the clover and the beans in the background. If the pic quality is good enough you can see the fuzzy horns above the beans

From: wildan
02-Jun-19
We put in 15 acres of various plots;gave up on soybeans;I am not trying to fence 15 acres. We plant instead;corn,sunflowers,sorghum and brassicas.As soon as the soybeans pop out of the ground they are gone. Also trying Timothy this year,clover mixes ect.Local farmers lost 80% of soybeans to deer.

From: LKH
02-Jun-19
Noticed a lot use the nylon/metal wire. I use the heavy gauge solid metal. Have a machine to hand crank it back and the handle is removable for the next fence. May seem like a pain, but I can drag the wire back and never leave the back of my pickup.

Take up spools were made from old tire rims.

From: t-roy
02-Jun-19
Any pics Larry?

From: LKH
02-Jun-19
I'll get some and see how I do at loading them. Should add that much of my wire is 15-18 years old and looks new.

From: LKH
02-Jun-19

LKH's embedded Photo
LKH's embedded Photo
LKH's embedded Photo
LKH's embedded Photo
LKH's embedded Photo
LKH's embedded Photo
photo 1

From: LKH
02-Jun-19

LKH's embedded Photo
LKH's embedded Photo

From: LKH
02-Jun-19
Hopefully I can add enough that you can see what was constructed. 1. The wire crank portion is mounted on a square tube frame that just fits crossways in a pickup bed. When loaded with a full wheel of wire it takes at least 2 guys or me and my tractor to load it.

2. One finger photo shows the handle which has a slip pipe over the end for ease of cranking.

3. Two fingers shows the square tube handle mount. This is essential and unless you want a broken hand, never try and free wheel the wire out with the handle attached. I place a plank/wood post on the wheel when pulling wire out to keep boil offs to a minimum.

4. Three fingers shows the mounting for the tire rim. I have 2 and need to make another since both mine are full and I need to take down another plot. Once the trees get big enough to deal with deer eating and then rubbing them I remove the wire.

Not sure, but at one time I probably had 5 miles of wire out.

I have taken down 2 plots and set another up in one day with this by myself. Try that with the nylon/tape. Probably the biggest advantage of the solid wire is that it drags back through the grass without too much effort. And it's about indestructible. This is probably only for the guys who plan on multiple plots over the years.

From: t-roy
02-Jun-19
That’s with the safety guards removed for photographic purposes, correct?! ;-)

Nice rig, Larry! Do you have to attach some type of weight on the end of the wire when you’re spooling it up? Also, why are you spooling it up each season? I started running high tensile steel wire on my outside wire this year, and I’m planning on just pushing it down to the ground in the fall, and pinning it there somehow, until the following spring, then all I will need to do is raise it back up and attach it to my insulators and posts again. Are you concerned that the deer will get tangled up in it?

From: LKH
02-Jun-19
I don't take it down at all and some of it stays in place for 10 years or more. Have 2 rows of blue spruce that have been wired for over 10 years and I think I'll need another 5 years before they are safe from rubbing. Over 80 trees and they vary quite a bit in size.

Normally there is enough pressure from the grass to hold the wire until quite close then I put a small log on it when rewinding.

Never put it down and left it but deer can be an issue. If you get one tangled they can really pull things around and it's a nasty way to kill a deer. I think you would find it easier to just leave it up and drop only the areas you want the deer to enter from.

From: t-roy
02-Jun-19
I will roll up the inner fencing in the fall. It’s turbo wire and tape, which is way more visible to the deer. I’m afraid that the deer would run into the wire and tear things up unless I push it all down to the ground. It won’t take that much effort to put it back up the following spring, vs having to roll it all up and unroll every year.

From: BullBuster
25-Jun-19
How effective are these fences? I put one up around my peas and a few deer are still jumping the fence. Outside tape at 20", inside wires at 18 and 30". Wires are hot, but not super hot. thanks

From: Mike-TN
25-Jun-19
Mine has been extremely effective. Without fence ... no beans. With fence .... beans. Occasionally I will get a pic with deer in the beans but they are few and far between

From: t-roy
25-Jun-19

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Keith.....I would suggest moving your top wire up to about 40” (about belt high on me) Bottom inside wire is set at approximately 18” (a little below the bottom of my kneecap) My outside wire is set at approximately 22”-24” (a little above the top of my kneecap)

How far apart are your inside and outside wires? I set mine at 3 feet. The hotter, the better on your fencer. Check and make sure that your fence isn’t grounding out somewhere as well. There always seems to be few a-hole deer that don’t seem to want to play by the rules, but, overall, the fences work extremely well. You could also try the “peanut butter on a rag” trick to possibly help deter them as well.

From: t-roy
25-Jun-19

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
I HAVE been having more issues with keeping deer out of my plots on my home farm the past couple of years. I’m thinking it’s due to the fact that a bunch of the surrounding farm ground has been put into CRP, so there is a lot less easily accessible corn & beans for the deer to browse on. I’m trying a little different fencing configuration on one bigger plot this year. Kind of similar to Mad Trapper’s setup. Outside strand of 18ga wire with the 3 inside strands set at an angle. The top strand at about 5 1/2’ and the middle is Turbo Tape for increased visibility (the outside steel wire is really difficult to see). Hopefully that slows them down a bunch.

From: BullBuster
25-Jun-19
inside are 30" from outside tape. I've checked over and over for grounding. all looks good. My inside top wire is on top position of posts. It may be a bit higher than 30". I'll try raising the outside tape a bit. thanks

From: BullBuster
25-Jun-19
inside are 30" from outside tape. I've checked over and over for grounding. all looks good. My inside top wire is on top position of posts. It may be a bit higher than 30". I'll try raising the outside tape a bit. thanks

From: kauaihunta
12-Jul-19
I use the non typical fencing kit I got years ago. So far its worked pretty well. I had a problem one year with one or two deer jumping the fence so I put the two strands on the outside and the one tape strand on the inside and haven't had a problem since. Did have to get more posts and tape because we fence about 5-6 acres. If not the deer will mow whatever we plant down and we are surrounded by ag fields. To retrieve the tape I've attached a pipe with a welded socket to a wooden reel. We use a Dewalt 20 volt heavy duty impact gun. You need to wear gloves because that stuff is coming in quick and will burn ya. Makes it real easy and fast to take the fence down though.

From: Mike-TN
12-Jul-19

Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Just took my fences down

From: t-roy
12-Jul-19
Curious what your reasoning is to take your fences down now, Mike?

From: LKH
12-Jul-19
30" is too low. Go to 40 and you'll have better results.

From: Mike-TN
14-Jul-19
Reasoning......I have enough growth to feed my deer densities through August or later. Hoping they have them pretty much eaten by then so I can broadcast wheat and radishes before a good rain.

From: t-roy
14-Jul-19
Gotcha, Mike.

I’m trying to get my beans to full maturity, so they have beans for browse into Dec/Jan. They have access to lots of other soybean fields next to my plots, to munch on in the meantime. I’ll broadcast brassicas into the standing beans in a couple of weeks, then rye/triticale into them around September 1st, like you, before a good rain. I, most likely, won’t get tremendous growth on the brassicas due to the beans still being canopied, but there should still be enough growth to provide the deer with some additional grub.

From: Mike-TN
14-Jul-19
I used to keep them fences to mid August thinking I would have pods in the late season.... wrong. As soon as I took down fence they stripped leaves and pods.... nothing but stalks left by end of September. By taking fences down I get a great summer attracting plot that should easily transition to a great fall / winter plot with 1 hour work of broadcasting wheat and radishes with a bag spreader. Combined with my clover it feels like I am keeping food pretty much year around and getting great hunting results

From: Mad Trapper
16-Jul-19
T-Roy are you broadcasting into beans that have been browsed to the ground?

From: t-roy
16-Jul-19

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Hopefully they’re not browsed that bad, Mad! I’m assuming you’re talking about broadcasting the brassicas/cereal grains into my current crop.? I’m hoping to totally exclude the deer from all of my fenced off corn and beans until they are fully mature. I’m getting a few deer in the plots, but, overall, they aren’t putting to much pressure on them so far. My corn is just starting to tassel. That’s when they seem to do the most damage to it.

From: t-roy
16-Jul-19

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Little better pic.

EDIT: Not sure what’s going on. Neither pic is the one I’m trying to post.

From: t-roy
16-Jul-19

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Hopefully the right pic this time.

From: Grubby
16-Jul-19
A coworker told me he fenced his garden but wasn’t having much luck. He spread peanut butter on the web type wire and his problems were solved.

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