Tight Spot Quivers
Brassicas/turnips with winter wheat?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Bobow 22-Jun-19
t-roy 22-Jun-19
Bobow 23-Jun-19
Thornton 23-Jun-19
DIY 23-Jun-19
t-roy 23-Jun-19
Bobow 24-Jun-19
HuntingAdict 24-Jun-19
JSW 24-Jun-19
APauls 24-Jun-19
weekender21 25-Jun-19
Shawn 25-Jun-19
From: Bobow
22-Jun-19
End of July or early Aug in NE Pa planning the annual brassicas/turnips mix. Used GRO's Frosty Delight and Fall Draw missed together in multiple small plots and had good results last year. Doing the same this year, but also considered adding a lite percentage of winter wheat at the same time. Have never planted grains before and wondering if this is a viable combination in this time frame? Thought WW would give some more nutrition deeper into winter. Any thoughts, positive or negative.

From: t-roy
22-Jun-19
I don’t think it would hurt a thing, Bob, however, I think I would wait to broadcast the cereal grain into the standing brassicas until around September 1st. If planted in early August, I think they will get too big and not be very palatable/attractive come November.

I think I would try to time it and seed your wheat right before a rain, if possible, and maybe seed it a bit on the heavy side. You won’t get nearly as much germination by going this route vs planting your wheat at the same time as your brassicas, but what does come up will be way more attractive to the deer, IMO. Also, you might try rye or triticale instead of wheat. The deer here seem to prefer those over wheat, but wheat will certainly attract them as well.

From: Bobow
23-Jun-19
Thanks Troy, unfortunately I only have that 2 week window around end of July to early Aug to plant in the fall, as I'm not a full time resident. But may get a buddy to plant the lite cover(WW, wr, or triticale) for me in Sept. All 4 plots will be lightly plowed or heavy chain dragged for the brassicas. How successful would the germination be for the 3 grains by just broadcasting on raw soil with no compaction, as I thought grains had to planted deeper. Or maybe I should just dedicate 1 of the 4 for grain only in Sept.

From: Thornton
23-Jun-19
I've done turnips with wheat and the only bad thing was I didn't plant it soon enough. On a dry year, the turnips didn't get very big and stopped growing with the frost. I'm thinking maybe I'll plant in July this year. It's a cheap and easy food plot for sure.

From: DIY
23-Jun-19
WR is just about bulletproof. Get it on the soil with a little sun and rain and you're going to get decent germination. Seed coverage and/or cultipacking helps, but definitely not required.

23-Jun-19
Troy is spot on IMO. Thorton, brassica should be planted in July in our area, cereal grains (rye grain, wheat around Labor Day, general guidelines.)

Rye grain easily germinates on top with the correct moisture, especially if the dirt had been worked earlier that year has been my experience. GL.

From: t-roy
23-Jun-19
You can grow cereal grain on a cinder block “IF” you get the moisture. If your buddy could sow those grains right before a rain, you would probably be in good shape, plus the existing brassicas will help hold the moisture in the ground longer than if it was bare ground as well. Like I stated before, I’d seed it a bit heavy to ensure enough of your seed that does make it to bare dirt does germinate. Cereal grains are relatively cheap.

Thornton and Frank.....I would think planting brassicas in your area (Kansas) in July would be way too early. We plant turnips/radishes/rape etc here in Iowa about August 1st generally, and, unless we get a very early frost, ours generally get fully mature about the right timeframe that way. Most turnips have an approximate 55-60 day maturity. If planted way early, you run the risk of the plants bolting and producing seed heads. The palatability and attractiveness of the plant goes downhill from there. The biggest issue that guys run into with planting turnips is planting them too thick.

From: Bobow
24-Jun-19
Thanks for the advice on the WW or WR. I didn't realize it could be that simple. If my buddy has a little time he could put the grain and some T19 down with a Earthway hand spreader as plot are small. We had record rainfall in NE Pa last summer and quite a bit this spring. Sounds like timing is everything in my situation. Curious to try something new.

From: HuntingAdict
24-Jun-19
I'm in NEPA as well, all the rain last year was tough on beats lost almost everything to the rain and wet conditions. I generally like to plant early to mid july to give the turnips and beets time to produce a big bulb. As someone mentioned above, seems like if you wait till August like most of the bags suggest, you wind up with really small bulbs or none at all. Might just be the valley I'm in but seems like 1st or 2nd week in July if weather cooperates is about prime.

From: JSW
24-Jun-19
I would do wheat or triticale over rye. Both have much higher protein value and the deer like them better. If I could only plant one thing, it would be alfalfa. Alfalfa is a lot of work. Second would be wheat or triticale. Wheat is supposed to have more protein than triticale but the deer seem to like the triticale better. Maybe because there is more wheat around. Both are just too easy. You can scatter it on top of the ground and it will come up. I prefer early to mid September for wheat. I've never done it that early but it's worth a try. It's about the cheapest seed you can plant and it always comes up.

From: APauls
24-Jun-19
I watched some youtube videos from Whitetail Habitat solutions and he has 7" Winter Rye growing in his truckbox end of September simply from carrying it around lol. So it appears to back up the claims and to grow fairly easily.

From: weekender21
25-Jun-19
Last fall I planted WR, WW, Oats, PTT, Radish, rape, MR clover and Crimson Clover in the same plot. I see no reason to plant only a few varieties.

25-Jun-19

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Troy,

Mid to late July is what is recommended in this area. I have good results with that if as you say I do not overseed and the ground is well fertilized. As much as I have tried them, the deer do not eat the greens or the bulb on my farm, this after at least 7 years of trying. They devour the beets and winter bulbs though. I have had decent luck with Daikon radish.

From: Shawn
25-Jun-19
I would do the, I am in mid NY and put the rye in around Sept 1st. for whatever reason our deer love the rye right through the winter. All ya need is rain ecsp the first few weeks after broadcasting it. Shawn

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