Florida Python roundup
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
Jim Moore 01-Jul-19
Scrappy 01-Jul-19
Rut Nut 01-Jul-19
smarba 01-Jul-19
Elite 1 01-Jul-19
Elite 1 01-Jul-19
IdyllwildArcher 01-Jul-19
stealthycat 01-Jul-19
kscowboy 01-Jul-19
smarba 01-Jul-19
bigswivle 01-Jul-19
Highlife 01-Jul-19
Thumper 01-Jul-19
Highlife 01-Jul-19
IdyllwildArcher 01-Jul-19
petedrummond 01-Jul-19
JTV 02-Jul-19
t-roy 02-Jul-19
Grey Ghost 02-Jul-19
SteveB 02-Jul-19
Mike B 02-Jul-19
Grey Ghost 02-Jul-19
rooster 02-Jul-19
Jim Moore 02-Jul-19
Ron Murphy 02-Jul-19
rooster 02-Jul-19
Grey Ghost 02-Jul-19
Tdvorak 02-Jul-19
320 bull 02-Jul-19
Ziek 02-Jul-19
bigswivle 02-Jul-19
smarba 03-Jul-19
Bowfreak 03-Jul-19
Franklin 03-Jul-19
lewis 04-Jul-19
Thumper 08-Jul-19
JayZ 08-Jul-19
Swampbuck 08-Jul-19
Shuteye 08-Jul-19
t-roy 08-Jul-19
JTV 09-Jul-19
LBshooter 09-Jul-19
spike78 10-Jul-19
lewis 10-Jul-19
From: Jim Moore
01-Jul-19

Jim Moore's Link
Thought this interesting. Kind of shines a light on what happens when you turn loose non-native species and how quickly and prolifically they populate.

"According to News Channel 4 out of Jacksonville, hunters killed over two miles worth of snakes with a weight approximately 10.4 tons. In total, 1,711 snakes have been captured during the program which is attempting to get rid of Burmese pythons that continue to do severe damage to the Everglades ecosystem.

Hunters were paid $50 a snake and $25 dollar bonus per foot for snakes over 4 feet. So an 8 ft snake would be worth $150 bucks. Also, a snake found guarding a nest with eggs is worth an additional $100.

The largest python ever killed in Florida was a female that measured 18 feet in length and weighed 128 pounds. If that snake was captured by one of the hunters it would have netted them a cool $400.

Brian Hargrove of Miami captured 235 snakes, the most of any hunter in the program."

A bit more at the link and I think I saw where there is a few youtube videos on it.

From: Scrappy
01-Jul-19
I'd catch them with a shotgun.

From: Rut Nut
01-Jul-19
No thanks! : (

From: smarba
01-Jul-19
Whoa...that income potential beats shed hunting! I'd be on it in a second if I lived in FL. But according to the article it's a drop in the bucket for what needs to be killed.

From: Elite 1
01-Jul-19
They have a program after Deadly Catch about catching those python there nuts.

From: Elite 1
01-Jul-19
Opps Deadliest catch

01-Jul-19
This has been going on for a while. They've been trying to eradicate them for years, but it seems impossible.

From: stealthycat
01-Jul-19
I'd love to do that - IIRC I read where they've figured out a way to track the chipped males .... and the males will lead to the females and by doing that, maybe they can eradicate them at some point

they've destroyed Everglades as I understand it

From: kscowboy
01-Jul-19
Our fly fishing guide on a trip to LA told us that when he did a camping trip to the Everglades that he read that raccoons were a problem for campers. He asked about it when he was about to set-off after grabbing a few supplies locally and the guy laughed and said there were no more small mammals left in the Everglades due to the snakes.

From: smarba
01-Jul-19

smarba's Link
Just plant crocodiles to get rid of the snakes...wait maybe that's not a good idea.

Seriously, they are apparently already there: see link

From: bigswivle
01-Jul-19
Habitat is better in the Everglades than there native homes. I’ve got buddies that kill them. Lots of them!!!

From: Highlife
01-Jul-19
Last time down that way working I'd spent some down time looking no luck. Make great looking backing for a selfbow.

From: Thumper
01-Jul-19
It was 20 years after they were released by hurricane that whipped out a wholesaler's building before the USFWS let anyone kill one, they were protected. ufb

From: Highlife
01-Jul-19
How in the hell do you protect an invasive species WTF!

01-Jul-19
With stupid law-makers and bureaucrats. Even more infuriating is the protection of wild horses and burros that are decimating landscapes and pushing out native wildlife.

From: petedrummond
01-Jul-19
do they taste like chicken? tell the Cajuns!

From: JTV
02-Jul-19
Looks like fun ... been on a few rattlesnake roundups to collect their venom when I lived in Texas ... those were a hoot ..

From: t-roy
02-Jul-19
I watched a documentary on what stealthycat touched on. They use chipped males and track them during the breeding season. The “Judas” males oftentimes lead the researchers to one or more breeding females. Very interesting show.

From: Grey Ghost
02-Jul-19
I’ve spent at least a week in the Glades for the last 5-6 years and I still haven’t seen a python. That includes no road kills, either.

I’m not saying there isn’t a problem, but it ain’t like they’re crawling everywhere. I like the eradication program, though. It gives a little extra income to some folks who really need it down there.

Matt

From: SteveB
02-Jul-19
On the contrary, it is a very serious problem and the whole eco system is getting out of whack.

From: Mike B
02-Jul-19
No idea who you're "contrary-ing".....people all agree it's a serious issue. The only way to get the eco system back into whack is to remove the uninvited, invasive species.

The bounty is enticing, but bear in mind that people hunting these snakes are hiking through some damn dangerous turf. From what I've learned from these TV shows, everything in the Glades wants to eat you, starting with the mosquito's all the way up to alligators and cougars.

Got no problem living around bears and a few cougar's, but Y'all can keep those bug infested swamps and big-assed snakes for yourselves..:)

From: Grey Ghost
02-Jul-19
I think if you've ever spent any time in the Everglades, you'd know how silly it is to think that snake hunters could have any significant impact on snake numbers there. It's 7800 square miles of some of the most remote and inaccessible wilderness there is.

Matt

From: rooster
02-Jul-19
The wife and I watch a couple of episodes of some guys and of course a nice looking woman, catching the pythons in the Everglades. Of course they had to instill drama by catching the snakes alive and by hand. When they take them in they are all dead. I couldn't figure why they weren't just whacking them where they found them.

From: Jim Moore
02-Jul-19
National Geographic Documentary. Pretty interesting. They can be up to 11 feet long after two years.

From: Ron Murphy
02-Jul-19
rooster, a lot are shot and left where they found them. But there is a group of people who are trying to find a way to make a living hunting these snakes,These folks tell me there is value in the skins, there is value in having the heads intact for taxidermy products, There is folks who even eat the meat so it makes sense to capture them alive and control how and when they kill them. The problem the way I see it we are only making a small dent in the population, To really get deep in the everglade on a regular bases requires that sometimes you need an airboat, sometimes a swamp buggy, sometimes a small boat, sometimes you use all the above on the same day depending on water height and where you are. So serious snake hunting can be expensiuve and hard to make the numbers work. Most snake hunting is along roads and anyplace you can gain entrance to the everglades and remain on land. I have been spending my winters in south Fla for the last 20+ yrs and have spent some time in the everglades. Its a beautiful and unique eco system that is in trouble.

From: rooster
02-Jul-19
Ron, I never thought about the taxidermy value.

From: Grey Ghost
02-Jul-19
Here's the problem with the eradication program as I see it.

First, the biological estimates for python numbers in the Glades ranges from 30,000 to 300, 000. That tells me they don't have a clue how many there really are. Second, there is only a relatively minuscule number of hunters who have any desire in this type of hunt. Third, even if there were enough hunters to eradicate the population, the ecological impact of that many hunters in the Everglades would likely be worse than the impact of the snakes.

According to the article, they've killed 1700 snakes since the program started over 2 years ago. I doubt the program is even scratching the surface of reproduction rates. There's a limited number of hunters who are rewarded a permit to hunt the snakes. Currently, the program has reached its quota of "removal agents", and they aren't accepting any more applications.

Like I said, it's a nice program that provides a select few hunters a little extra income, but I highly doubt it's having any significant impact on python numbers.

Matt

From: Tdvorak
02-Jul-19
I’d pay to hunt pythons. I’ve searched for several years for an outfitter but can’t find one. Does anybody have a name of an outfitter that guides python hunts. PM me or post it here.

From: 320 bull
02-Jul-19
I have been driving across on highway 41 annually for the last 4 years and have only seen 1 roadkill. I am pretty good with swamps and all that but the everglades is a beast. They will only be able to manage the situation at best going the bounty route. Not many folks are gonna go out in that stuff to hunt them.

From: Ziek
02-Jul-19
Are they letting them hunt in the NP, or just surrounding areas? The "everglades" is a huge area. They'll NEVER get rid of those snakes.

From: bigswivle
02-Jul-19
“I’m not saying there isn’t a problem, but it ain’t like they’re crawling everywhere“

They are crawling everywhere Matt.

From: smarba
03-Jul-19
Well they sure ain't WALKING! LOL

From: Bowfreak
03-Jul-19
There are no mountain lions out west. I've hunted elk the last 4-5 years and I've never seen one.

From: Franklin
03-Jul-19
The state of Florida just released the hounds on the Green Iguana....anything short of animal cruelty is now acceptable to kill them. Anytime....anywhere....any weapon.

From: lewis
04-Jul-19
I grew up in Homestead Florida right next to the Glades it’s incredible the damage these snakes have done.One was killed with a 76 lbs deer in its belly.Most small mammals are just about gone.A farmer I know disked 2 fields a couple of miles from my former home killed 9 in one and 11 or 12 in the other these were 5 acre fields.It is a major mess.Lewis

From: Thumper
08-Jul-19
A good hard freeze for a few days would drastically cut their numbers to nearly none/zero.

From: JayZ
08-Jul-19
Must be why there is no snakes in places like SD, MT, CO, ID, ND, etc.....

From: Swampbuck
08-Jul-19
Hard freeze in the glades for a few days, when pigs fly my friends....

From: Shuteye
08-Jul-19
I saw some snake hunters using a drone to hunt Pythons at night. A special camera on the drone showed the snakes almost glowing. The drone would hover over the snake. The guy with the controls had a gps reading that would lead them to the snake if it was too dark to see the drone. When they got there the drone turned on a really bright light and they could see really well to get the snake. It also showed other smaller snakes.

From: t-roy
08-Jul-19
It would be interesting to know what the camera on the drone was keying in on, to be able to pick the snakes up. Temperature differential possibly? I would think the snake’s body temps would be pretty close to the surrounding environment.?

From: JTV
09-Jul-19

JTV's Link
16 ft python, 40+ eggs

https://www.foxnews.com/science/python-nest-eggs-florida-everglades-removed

From: LBshooter
09-Jul-19
Guardians of the glades, guy gets paid for each snake, then sells the skins ,meat and the gallbladder for medicine. Each snake is valuable. Mother Nature will have to step in and take these snakes out with a massive cold spell, maybe a week of freezing temps?

From: spike78
10-Jul-19
I highly doubt a massive cold spell will kill them. You forget we have frogs, turtles, and snakes up here in the northeast that do just fine in the winter.

From: lewis
10-Jul-19
We never have or never will have a week of freezing temperatures in South Florida. I was there in77 when it snowed a day or so later back in the 70s.A few years ago we had a severe cold spell that killed a lot of fish and actually a few crocs did not faze the snakes.Lewis

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