eBike Generation
Dirt Mounds- moles or worms or??
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
HuntFish 20-Aug-19
HuntFish 20-Aug-19
HuntFish 20-Aug-19
JusPassin 20-Aug-19
Grey Ghost 20-Aug-19
HuntFish 20-Aug-19
JTV 20-Aug-19
drycreek 20-Aug-19
Franklin 20-Aug-19
LKH 20-Aug-19
FrigidArrows 21-Aug-19
APauls 21-Aug-19
rooster 21-Aug-19
Dirk Diggler 21-Aug-19
dirtclod Az. 21-Aug-19
HuntFish 21-Aug-19
BullBuster 22-Aug-19
HuntFish 22-Aug-19
rmich10 22-Aug-19
Scoot 22-Aug-19
HuntFish 22-Aug-19
FrigidArrows 22-Aug-19
drycreek 22-Aug-19
great white 01-Sep-19
From: HuntFish
20-Aug-19

HuntFish's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
HuntFish's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

Brand new to site and my first post. Planted a small clover plot this spring and it came in very nicely. Looked great for weeks. Took a look at it yesterday after not seeing it for about six weeks and now its in decline. I have a bunch of these soft mounds of dirt in the Plot. Anybody know what they are? I researched it a bit but can’t confirm exactly what it is- mole mounds or worm castings (crap)? Or something else. It seems to be a big part of what’s causing my plot issues. Any remedies?

From: HuntFish
20-Aug-19

HuntFish's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
HuntFish's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

From: HuntFish
20-Aug-19

HuntFish's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
HuntFish's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

From: JusPassin
20-Aug-19
I'd go with earthworms. Looks like their waste.

From: Grey Ghost
20-Aug-19
Looks like earthworm/nightcrawler castings to me. Definitely not moles.

The easy way to confirm would be at night, after a rain, with a flashlight.

Matt

From: HuntFish
20-Aug-19
I read it’s great fertilizer but boy it’s messing up my plot big time. Covering the clover and making it very spotty..

From: JTV
20-Aug-19
Crawfish/Crawdads .... or moles......if its a small mound, quarter size its earthworms ... crawfish usually have a hole w/mound around it, well made, but dont count them out as the hole dosnt have to be present... ..

From: drycreek
20-Aug-19
Earthworms are beneficial to your soil, not a liability. If your clover ain’t what it’s supposed to be there’s another reason.

From: Franklin
20-Aug-19
Moles usually leave a raised path as they tunnel. My guess is worms....scoop that up and put it in your garden.

From: LKH
20-Aug-19
It's not pocket gophers. They leave large mounds and rarely is there a visible hole.

From: FrigidArrows
21-Aug-19
I agree with others that this is worms, based on the castings. There is no better advocate for your food plot then a mess of earthworms or crawlers. IT may be visually unappealing, but the amount of worms you must have are doing far more beneficial things to your plot, then bad.

Drainage, fertilizer, and aeration, all for free.

The reason you have so many, is because it is the first time planting on that site. The more tillage you do, the less and less you will see, which is not ideal in many cases.

I don't remember the exact numbers, but it was something to the affect if you take a spade full of dirt out, can count 6 worms in it, it is the equivalent of almost a ton of fertilizer per acre, per year. Money in the bank my friend.

Do not get discouraged, for a first year planting that looks pretty legit. Clovers and alfalfa are always a 2nd year crop, as in it will come back next spring twice as thick (as long as you planted a perennial). At that point, you wont be able to see the worm mounds anyway.

From: APauls
21-Aug-19
Looks like night crawlers to me. Which should only help with any kind of growth. Like someone else said, check at night and you'll see if it is.

From: rooster
21-Aug-19
With nothing to compare size wise it's a tough call. My first thought was craw dads as mentioned above.

From: Dirk Diggler
21-Aug-19
Nightcrawlers.

From: dirtclod Az.
21-Aug-19
Chupacabra Droppings.

From: HuntFish
21-Aug-19
All good advice, thanks

From: BullBuster
22-Aug-19
Overseed with more clover. Those mounds will take it right up.

From: HuntFish
22-Aug-19
If I overseed now, do you think it will grow this season or lie dormant till next year?

From: rmich10
22-Aug-19
All clover plots suffer through the summer. Will perk right back up as temps drop and rains return. Hit it with 100 lbs acre of 0-20-20 in Sept and it will be great come Spring

From: Scoot
22-Aug-19
Like rooster said- hard to tell how big those are. Give us something for size reference. Probably night crawlers, but if much bigger than that it could be crawfish. Are you very near a water source?

From: HuntFish
22-Aug-19
There’s a small creek down a hill from my plot. Are you saying crawfish go in dirt away from water???? I can’t imagine them making the trek to my plot. Maybe it’s the summer heat stress as well, going to fertilize again soon!

From: FrigidArrows
22-Aug-19
Hunt,

I honestly don't know if you would need to overseed. The pictures you have shown are pretty decent for how young the plants are. You certainly can, and clover seed is cheap.

If you chose to, this is absolutely the best time you could overseed!

I just planted a fall cereal plot, but also mixed in clover specifically for next spring. The clover will germinate but still be pretty young by the time it goes dormant for the winter. In the spring, since it already has a foothold, it will take off before any weed can get established. As I had stated, make sure its perennial (had a buddy find out the hard way).

My clover plots are the first things to grow/green up on my property. Typically beating weed germination by a few weeks. A few weeks later, if there are weeds, they will be choked out.

From: drycreek
22-Aug-19
Just as a PSA, crawfish have been in my plot beside the creek several times. It gets pretty wet. They like wet. But them ain’t crawfish mounds, them are earthworms.

From: great white
01-Sep-19
just put a trail camera on it!

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