Moultrie Products
Sheep Hunt in the Russian Far East
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
Spiral Horn 29-Aug-19
M.Pauls 29-Aug-19
Overland 29-Aug-19
JohnMC 29-Aug-19
Southern draw 29-Aug-19
Treeline 29-Aug-19
HUNT MAN 29-Aug-19
Beav 29-Aug-19
Bowfinatic 29-Aug-19
JTreeman 29-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 29-Aug-19
kota-man 29-Aug-19
tkjwonta 29-Aug-19
otcWill 29-Aug-19
Predeter 29-Aug-19
Stekewood 29-Aug-19
bowhunter24 30-Aug-19
altitude sick 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
ki-ke 30-Aug-19
njbuck 30-Aug-19
altitude sick 30-Aug-19
woodguy65 30-Aug-19
Trial153 30-Aug-19
APauls 30-Aug-19
Bowbender 30-Aug-19
SBH 30-Aug-19
Tilzbow 30-Aug-19
bohuntr 30-Aug-19
BOWNBIRDHNTR 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
JohnMC 30-Aug-19
FORESTBOWS 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
JTreeman 30-Aug-19
RogBow 30-Aug-19
Southern draw 30-Aug-19
Scar Finga 30-Aug-19
Bake 30-Aug-19
Rocking R 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
kota-man 30-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 30-Aug-19
JohnMC 31-Aug-19
elmer@laptop 31-Aug-19
tkjwonta 31-Aug-19
kota-man 31-Aug-19
Adventurewriter 31-Aug-19
Stekewood 31-Aug-19
woodguy65 31-Aug-19
altitude sick 31-Aug-19
sticksender 31-Aug-19
Ken 31-Aug-19
dakotaduner 31-Aug-19
Southern draw 31-Aug-19
Bowboy 31-Aug-19
BOWNBIRDHNTR 31-Aug-19
Jim in PA 31-Aug-19
Treeline 31-Aug-19
altitude sick 31-Aug-19
RK 31-Aug-19
kota-man 31-Aug-19
2xLung 31-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 31-Aug-19
Spiral Horn 31-Aug-19
JTreeman 31-Aug-19
Rocking R 31-Aug-19
elkmtngear 31-Aug-19
JL 31-Aug-19
Bowfinatic 31-Aug-19
SBH 31-Aug-19
Photohunter 31-Aug-19
Trial153 31-Aug-19
The rookie 31-Aug-19
goelk 31-Aug-19
Buffalo1 31-Aug-19
Kurt 31-Aug-19
Beav 01-Sep-19
M.Pauls 01-Sep-19
Bou'bound 01-Sep-19
Bake 01-Sep-19
INbowdude 01-Sep-19
Spiral Horn 01-Sep-19
From: Spiral Horn
29-Aug-19

Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (PKC) Airport
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (PKC) Airport
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Typical Russian Market Center - Fruit, veggies, fish, caviar, booze
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Typical Russian Market Center - Fruit, veggies, fish, caviar, booze
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Huge Ram Taken on the Hunt just prior to mine
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Huge Ram Taken on the Hunt just prior to mine
Used to post on the bowsite often but have been dormant for a little while, perhaps a bit too long. But thought folks might appreciate a report about something just a little bit different. No intent other than sharing my experience with fellow hunters. So, here goes ….

I’d always had a sense of adventure and just love hunting sheep and goats. Yep, mountain game is my current passion and focus. I’ve done the MacKenzies and Coastal BC Mountains, all of Spain, the French Alps, New Zealand, etc – but never hunted Asia. After getting references and chatting with both old and new friends in SCI and GSCO I became much better informed and many of the mysteries were unlocked. That’s one huge benefit of membership – access to a wealth of hunting hunting/travel knowledge & experience. I was considering several different hunts and after some research settled on Kamchatka Snow Sheep – to me they are just magnificent (like a cross between a RMBH & Stone), it’s a truly remote adventure, and seemingly a value buy in the international sheep hunting market (still expensive, but less than any North American Sheep Hunt). One catch is – although there is progress, bowhunting is not yet quite legal in Russia – same with many other countries throughout the world. So, I had to become OK with a rifle hunt. No problem, as I was really into having this hunting experience.

Hunters are very generous people, and most that I reached out to were very friendly and helpful, providing a depth of information about best areas, outfitter recommendations, tips and tricks, and pitfalls to avoid. With a handful of outfitters to follow up with, we exchanged emails and made arrangements to meet at upcoming sportman’s shows here in the U.S. – find there’s just no substitute for “facemail” when making these choices. All of a sudden it was no longer a dream but found myself writing a deposit check to Max Vorobiev and Professional Russian Outfitters. Travel to Russia is quite a bit more complex than most. There is a fairly detailed Visa application process, and you cannot just book a flight on Kayak or Orbitz if traveling with a weapon (needs pre-approval). Just followed all the steps in instructions and ensured that everything (especially concerning the weapon) was 100% complete and accurate and all was fine. In Russia they meticulously checked everything, but the good news was due to this tight control I was very confident my weapon would arrive with me at Petropavlovsk. I transited Moscow with the help of a company rep – no issues or problems and was shortly on my way to Petropavlovsk.

Petropavlovsk is a small but extremely busy airport, especially this time of year (need to show up way ahead of a flight). Of course, upon landing I heard quite a bit of English being spoken by fellow American hunters and fishermen also transiting PKC – the guys leaving telling stories and showing pics to the guys arriving. Quickly met up with Max, cleared weapons, and were off to the helicopter to camp. We would be in camp that afternoon. On the way Max told me that he’d gotten word that they’d already spotted two rams from camp. Then he showed me the trophy pic from the hunt just before mine – a huge 12year old with intact lamb tips taken on day 2 of the hunt – very impressive. We would be hunting another area, but I was praying we would also be so lucky. So far everything had gone exactly to plan, and things were looking very good.

From: M.Pauls
29-Aug-19
Ooh been waiting for this since some of your recent posts :) carry on...

From: Overland
29-Aug-19
Very much looking forward to the next installment.

From: JohnMC
29-Aug-19
Get to typing!!! ;)

29-Aug-19
Looking forward to hearing about your adventure!

From: Treeline
29-Aug-19
Hot Damn!

Going to be following this one!

Bucket list hunt!

Please, continue.

From: HUNT MAN
29-Aug-19
More more please

From: Beav
29-Aug-19
Keep it coming!

29-Aug-19
Oh yeah!

From: JTreeman
29-Aug-19
This is just mean...

—Jim

From: Spiral Horn
29-Aug-19

Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Mountain where we encountered the rams
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Mountain where we encountered the rams
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Our taxi to camp
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Our taxi to camp
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
The approach is much tougher than it looks from a distance
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
The approach is much tougher than it looks from a distance
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Home away from home
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Home away from home
Since I was the only hunter on this trip we avoided the very big and expensive Mi-8 and took a smaller Robinson Helicopter to camp. It was a beautiful, sunny day and I got a bird’s-eye view along the way. It was about a 45min ride, and as soon as we left the small village where the chopper was parked it was nothing but wilderness the rest of the way. No roads, trails, power lines, etc – just a whole lot of dense brushy and wet bog down in the valley which kind of reminded me of Newfoundland. It was a whole lot of nothing except a single moose/bear fly-in hunting camp down in the valley. Even spotted a brown bear along the way – which ended up being an everyday sighting on this trip.

When we hit the mountains the change was immediate and dramatic. The elevations weren’t high, just 5-6,000ft but it was pretty much climbing up from sea level. The landscape was stunningly gorgeous with vivid green brush and alpine, mineral rich rock slides, snow patches, and numerous water-runs, all set against a deep blue sky.

Little did I know but the mountain pictured (as seen on the way into camp) is where we would eventually encounter the rams. Don’t know how the terrain looks in the picture, but I can attest it is no joke and much harder than it looks. A long journey and a thoroughly butt-kicking trek. From a distance it often appears like you can get right to where you want to go. But as mountain hunters know or find out, that’s sometimes not the case, or at best the terrain is much harder than it looked from a distance.

Camp was quite comfortable – had my own tent (the one closest to the water) and a separate mess tent. They’d picked a very good site too – water right there, out of the wind, and with a great view of most of the surrounding country. Also, the guys I was with were just great. Although Max was the only one who spoke English, they were fun, happy, positive guys who hunted very hard but also liked to have fun in camp. Food was also very good – mostly real authentic Russian food.

Things were looking very good when I arrived in camp. It was late afternoon on beautiful, clear day. After dropping my gear in front of my newly assigned quarters one of the guides showed me two rams on the closest mountain to camp, one of them looked like a shooter. The plan was simple. Put them to bed, get up in the morning, reacquire the rams and climb into position for a shot. But with a confirmed track record as a last-day/last-hour of the hunt kind of guy something in me doubted it would be that easy.

From: kota-man
29-Aug-19
I’m “all in”...

From: tkjwonta
29-Aug-19
This is awesome, I'm hooked

From: otcWill
29-Aug-19
Only through bowsite. So badass

From: Predeter
29-Aug-19
Awesome, keep it coming!

From: Stekewood
29-Aug-19
This is great!

From: bowhunter24
30-Aug-19
Looking forward to this thanks a bunch!

30-Aug-19
It doesn’t look like easy terrain to me.

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19

Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
9ft+ bear walking where we had been 30 min ago
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
9ft+ bear walking where we had been 30 min ago
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
On the trek
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
On the trek
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Ram I missed
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Ram I missed
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
You can see the bad weather coming but all you can do is brace for impact
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
You can see the bad weather coming but all you can do is brace for impact
The next morning we were greeted by an 8ft Brown Bear curiously circling camp, but no rams. After many hours of glassing and miles of trekking the mountains we never spotted them again. However, I was encouraged by the tremendous amount of sheep sign, as there had to be more rams about; and I was totally surprised by the number of bears. I’d always heard that Kamchatka was pretty much “bear heaven” and from what I observed that’s an understatement. In addition to seeing three wolverines on this trip, there was bear sign everywhere (tracks, scat – even dens). We saw bears every day, sometimes multiple times per day, including a few trophy class boars. The one pictured here is an absolute giant (9ft+) and he’s walking where we just were ½ hour earlier.

Day two was much of the same, plenty of trekking and glassing, but no sheep. Had my InReach Mini on this trip and it was truly a gem. Not only was I able keep in touch and give live updates to family and friends but it also provided detailed weather reports for the exact spot on earth where we were standing. On this day it said there was a 20% chance of heavy rain in the afternoon. I quickly learned that anytime the device said a chance of rain, Kamchatka considered that a direct order from multi-star general. By 4pm the rain, fog and dropping temperature was not likely to relent so we headed back to camp.

By the afternoon of the third hunting day I was getting a bit tired of climbing until my quads burned, glassing until my eyes bled, and not seeing any sheep. It just didn’t make sense as the place was littered with sheep sign and tracks. To add some additional stress, the forecast for the coming days didn’t look very good. But I kind of expected that. Just like Alaska, its virtually impossible to hunt Kamchatka without getting wet. But what alarmed me even more was not physically feeling well, and by mid-afternoon I was miles from camp and violently ill – nausea, chills and shivering are really magnified while on a windy mountainside. We had to head back to camp. Literally every single step hurt and was a real physical challenge to overcome. And at the worst possible moment we spotted the rams from when we first landed in camp. One was obviously too young and the other had good mass but wasn’t quite full curl. With the moment upon us, bad weather coming, and no time to analyze the guys wanted me to take the ram.

I’d spent the better part of a year preparing for just this moment, but this was proof that God has a sense of humor, or it just wasn’t the outcome He had in mind. As a former “Range Officer” I certainly would have never let anyone handle a weapon when while in that condition -- I was visibly sick, nauseous and shivering, with the ram was over 440 yards away at an extreme uphill angle. But I had to try as the opportunity was there and might not come again. After calculating the ballistics I squeezed off the shot, but just couldn’t stop shaking - I was unsteady and missed. Now I was heading back to camp both sick and upset with myself for missing. But later, video confirmed the ram was one of those “tweener” animals, good mass and genetics but still young at 8 or 9 years old. He was a borderline shooter and if we had time to analyze through the scope would have had a pretty long discussion about whether to take him or not. Personally, I generally like pass on animals with his potential and let them grow to full maturity. But in the end I had mixed feelings as I really didn’t want to go home without a ram. Just maybe, the larger forces might have something better in mind.

I faced no criticism from the guides as everyone knew I was hurting, but I could see the disappointment. Their attention quickly turned to my health and they offered a plethora of Russian folk remedies (most included vodka to some degree – I didn’t bite). They were a bit eccentric, but at the same time very genuine. Yep, there was no denying it, I liked them quite a bit.

It was a good thing too as the weather took a nose-dive and for the next 4-5 days we were pretty much “socked-in” by rain and fog and unable to hunt. If there was a good time to be sick, this was it. Luckily, I had some Cipro with me, which quickly had me on the mend and ready to hunt again far before the weather broke. Even on the days the rain held off, the combination of fog and low-ceiling make it difficult to see the likely sheep hangouts on the mountains. During one clearing period we did go for a trek to one of the observation points, but within a few hours heavy fog rolled in and we headed back to camp.

From: ki-ke
30-Aug-19
Great story! Like Will said, where can you read this stuff but here?!

Cipro. Don't leave home (civilization) without it.........

From: njbuck
30-Aug-19
Keep it coming!

30-Aug-19
What an adventure!

From: woodguy65
30-Aug-19
Now this is an adventure - very cool story. That chopper looks "modern" I was expecting something from the 70's-80's militaryish. LOL

That frigin' brown bear looks HUGE even from that distance - look at that belly.

From: Trial153
30-Aug-19
excellent. if they every open it up to bow hunting its on my list!! congrats !!!

From: APauls
30-Aug-19
Stellar. You got me hooked.

From: Bowbender
30-Aug-19
Sitting here with my coffee waiting for the next update!!

From: SBH
30-Aug-19
wow....incredible man. Cant wait for the rest.

From: Tilzbow
30-Aug-19
Sweet story so far. This is what Bowsite is all about!

From: bohuntr
30-Aug-19
Awesome story, keep it coming!

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
30-Aug-19
Ok, I'm in!

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19

Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Fog Rising From the Valley
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Fog Rising From the Valley
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Bound and determined to make it to the top
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Bound and determined to make it to the top
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Taking a much needed breather after cresting the vertical pull
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Taking a much needed breather after cresting the vertical pull
The guys were great in camp but never squandered a moment of hunting time, glassing the surrounding hills during any clear moments. Then on Tuesday, the assistant guide named Alec spotted three rams on the furthest mountain we could see from camp. This was great news as the weather forecast was clearing throughout the afternoon and overnight and a bright sunny Wednesday with 0% predicted chance of rain, and pretty much the same for next day or two – which is about all the time we had left to hunt. So, we planned to wake up at dawn in the hopes of finding and pursuing sheep.

Wednesday morning was a welcome sight, sunny with clear skies. By 07:00 Alec once again found the rams and we were quickly staging and getting ready to head out. But the rams were many miles away and it was getting very late in the hunt (day 9). After today, we would have 2 days left at best, so this was pretty much an all-or-nothing journey to the distant mountain. Max estimated it would be 6-8 hours to get to the rams and prepped me that this would not be easy and we’d all have to fully commit. Also, even though it was sunny today all of the residual moisture had fog rising up from the valleys which may interfere with or even kill the effort. My take was, we had multiple rams spotted near the same area we’d seen them the day before. Without a defined plan B and time running short, we were about to dive into the deep end of the pool.

It took us many miles and about 9 hours over some of the steepest, nastiest terrain - rock slides, side-hilling over wet vegetation, facing swarms of blackflies, and a lot of brute force trekking-climbing to reach the rams. No idea how much elevation was gained, lost and regained along the way. But we were determined to reach the rams prior to them getting up for their afternoon feed. One big motivator was about ½ way there we found a good observation point where we could see part of where the rams had been. Max scoped one of them still bedded where we’d seen them earlier and he looked like a pretty good shooter. Bolstered with new confidence we continued the assault on the mountain.

When we hit the last big pull up the steepest part of the mountain my gas tank was already empty. It was sheer willpower now, but I kept thinking – “all I have to do is make it to the top – there are rams up there.” It was grueling, but one step at a time I finally crested the hill, dropped my pack, and took a well-deserved breather. While sitting I noticed that my t-shirt was completely saturated and stuck to me like plastic-wrap. But even though we’d crested the vertical we weren’t quite there yet. Next we had to cross several hundred meters of loose rock on the back side of a cliff. It was bad. Not a single piece was stable, even the huge rocks moved. As we crossed, in addition to the threat of breaking my neck, I was worried that the noise and tumbling rocks would spook the rams. But perhaps the mountain would shield the noise. (wanted to take a pic, but figured if I let go with even one hand the final snapshot of the hunt would be of me face-planting into the rocks on a steep sidehill).

Finally!!! Many grueling mountain miles after spotting them, we first laid eyes on the bedded rams. There was no shot yet, but we were well positioned on the hunting chessboard. Now the rams had the next move. After catching my breath, I began getting set up for a possible shot. But just then, the rising fog that had been steadily following us up the mountain had arrived and completely obscured our view. As fate would have it the rams had risen from their beds and through the mist, I caught a brief glimpse of a huge ram and his buddy walking out of our lives. I overheard my guide Max softly say, “that’s a big one.”

Nobody needed to say a word. Our expressions captured it all. The same rain and fog that had been thwarting our every move for the past 5 days was now threatening to kill this marathon stalk as well. But today was different. This time the sun was fighting back as the fog was rolling in. So, we waited as the larger forces slugged it out, hoping to get some sign of where the rams had gone and a fighting chance at a shot. But as the fog cleared there was no sign of the rams.

From: JohnMC
30-Aug-19
My wife gets ready to go out faster than you telling this story! Just kidding enjoying but get to typing!!

30-Aug-19
I heard bowhunting is now legal in Russia

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19
Now, now Forest — no hijacking please - this is a “debate-free” thread.

Best info I have from people in the know is that it has not yet passed all legal hurdles and no implementation standards have even been drafted - but do you’all want to hear the rest of the story, or argue about something not yet resolved by the proper authority?

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19
Going out to dinner - will post next segment in a few hours.

From: JTreeman
30-Aug-19
Let’s do the argue thing!

Just kidding, eager for the rest of the story.

—Jim

From: RogBow
30-Aug-19
Great pics

30-Aug-19
Getting good and great story telling!

From: Scar Finga
30-Aug-19
Damn I am hooked!!!!! Eat a samitch and keep typing!!!!

From: Bake
30-Aug-19
I’m watching too. I did this hunt last year. I’m hoping to see you with a dead ram at the end!

Bake

From: Rocking R
30-Aug-19
Awesome thread! Can’t wait to hear the rest of the story! Thanks for sharing.

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19

Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Ram #1 - Definite Shooter who was looking good until I saw Ram #2
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Ram #1 - Definite Shooter who was looking good until I saw Ram #2
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Ram #2 After once glance I forgot all about Ram #1
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
Ram #2 After once glance I forgot all about Ram #1
After scouring the landscape for what seemed like an eternity, we spotted movement and then a ram emerged, feeding his way up a small ravine. I studied him a bit and he looked like ~10year old with good mass and approaching full curl. A shooter for sure – I was thrilled. As I was admiring him and hoping for a shot opportunity Max began excitedly saying, “the second one! … the second one!” Once glance and I immediately lost all interest in the ram I’d been admiring. He was gorgeous! A heavy-horned, over full-curl Monarch. He was either the king of this mountain or his older brother. The kind of ram we all fantasize about but almost never see, especially with a weapon and tag in hand.

The current challenge was they were now about 500 yards away. Although this was much further than I wanted to shoot, they continued feeding toward us, but after feeding around for quite a while they didn’t move very far and bedded again at about 480. We were concealed on a rock ledge above the rams. But the ground between us was wide-open and started with another big rockslide. There was just no way to get any closer without being busted, so this was likely the best opportunity we were going to get. The first ram was certainly a shooter in his own right, but even if he came closer nobody would ever forgive me if I took him over the big ram. The excited chatter among the guides barely died down since the first good look at the second ram. Then Max and I had a quick chat.

It was late in the hunt (day 9) and we’d need a recovery period before climbing this mountain again. So, with the threat of more fog or the rams walking out even further, we decided that I’d take the shot when the big ram stood. I would shoot for 480 and there really didn’t seem to be enough wind to do any doping. So, I set up with a pretty “rock solid” rest and readied for the shot. As if on que the big ram stood up, quartered slightly away and began feeding.

I settled the BRH reticle and meticulously squeezed off the shot. As the rifle reported Max confirmed, “you hit him.” We watched as the two rams ran about 100 yards, then Ram #1 continued up the mountain, but the big guy turned and ran down a ravine. However, by the ram’s reaction, I knew he was hit hard but also that something wasn’t quite right with the shot. As we pursued, we were shocked to find about a 20-25mph crosswind cutting across the valley where the rams had been standing, mystery solved! It was a long sneak following up on the ram and all sorts of doubt began running through my mind.

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19

From: kota-man
30-Aug-19
Oh man!

From: Spiral Horn
30-Aug-19

Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
The Ram I came to Russia for - a hard won trophy
Spiral Horn's embedded Photo
The Ram I came to Russia for - a hard won trophy
It was a very long shot and we’d misjudged the wind. But fortunately the elevation was correct and he was hit hard. The ram hadn’t gone far from where we’d last seen him. We found him quickly and were able to make the recovery.

Words cannot adequately describe all of the emotions felt as I first stood over this hard-won trophy. He was an absolutely gorgeous old warrior – a broomed, 13 year old, who was certainly the king of this mountain. This was the ram I came to Russia for, made all the more special by all we had to endure to make it all come together. The sweetest things in life, lasting friendships and triumphant memories, are often born from the greatest challenges. Some things are at their best when truly earned.

From: JohnMC
31-Aug-19
Wow awesome! Look at that country behind you. Dream hunt. Thanks for sharing. Post up some random pictures if you have them.

From: elmer@laptop
31-Aug-19
That's awesome

From: tkjwonta
31-Aug-19
Outstanding! Great storytelling, great scenery and a ram of a lifetime.

From: kota-man
31-Aug-19
Fantastic...congrats!

31-Aug-19
Awesome that looks like and old ram!!!

From: Stekewood
31-Aug-19
Wow! What a great hunt. Congratulations on a fantastic ram. Love the picture.

From: woodguy65
31-Aug-19
Wow beautiful- looks like a painting, great story.

31-Aug-19
This story is just like a great hunt or book,

hate to see it end.

From: sticksender
31-Aug-19
Beautiful ram and no doubt highly gratifying to see all your effort pay off!

From: Ken
31-Aug-19
Great ram and story.

From: dakotaduner
31-Aug-19
Congratulations Ken, What a incredible adventure, thanks for sharing with us.

31-Aug-19
Congrats that’s a beauty ! Thanks for sharing!

From: Bowboy
31-Aug-19
Congrats on a great animal. Thanks for sharing!

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
31-Aug-19
Beautiful ram and awesome story. Thanks for sharing with us!!

From: Jim in PA
31-Aug-19
Congratulations on a great ram and an awesome adventure! I was there a few years ago and it is the real deal. I think it is one of the best values in sheep hunting today with the added benifit of being a real international experience. How were the mosquito's, haha.

From: Treeline
31-Aug-19
Beautiful ram!

Took it to the wire and made it happen.

Yes, you certainly earned that one!

Congratulations!

31-Aug-19
Are the brown bears able to be hunted as an add on.

From: RK
31-Aug-19
Great write up and awesome sheep Congratulations!!

From: kota-man
31-Aug-19
Congrats...Great ram.

From: 2xLung
31-Aug-19
Very cool story and fantastic sheep!

From: Spiral Horn
31-Aug-19
You’re not kidding Jim, mosquitoes and black flies = like a biblical plaque on the final stalk. It had been raining 4-5 days so when the sun reappeared they came out with a vengeance. Bug spray and headnet are vital equipment.

From: Spiral Horn
31-Aug-19
Yes Jay, Brown Bears are available on a trophy fee basis. I had a great offer, but the Bear season didn’t open until the latter part of my trip and I wouldn’t recommend engaging until after a Ram is down. Also, I was toting my sheep rifle (light & handy). I’d probably bring my 300 Weatherby if also looking to take a Bear, but that’s a big rig to be lugging around the Sheep Mountains. Although a combo is possible, timing is a trade-off, better Sheep Hunting in August, better Bear hunting in September (hides thickening, and feeding on berries). I already have ~9ft Alaskan Brownie so it wasn’t a big pull for me. Personally, I’d recommend keeping Sheep as the primary goal and only hunting the bear if tagged out early on Sheep. Otherwise they are very successful on Spring Bear (when hides are very thick) - but there are a ton of bears there. My 2 Cents

From: JTreeman
31-Aug-19
Awesome. Congrats.

—Jim

From: Rocking R
31-Aug-19
Congratulations on your hard earned trophy. Sounds like an incredible adventure. Thanks for taking us along!

From: elkmtngear
31-Aug-19
Great adventure, Congrats on your well-earned success!

From: JL
31-Aug-19
Great story and pics. Congrats and thanks for taking the time to write it up.

31-Aug-19
Thank you for sharing I didn't even know they had sheep! Broadening my horizons. Way to get it done

From: SBH
31-Aug-19
Hell ya

Congrats man. That’s a tremendous story. Thanks for the post

From: Photohunter
31-Aug-19
That's an awesome hunt and ram! Thank you for sharing. Wow!

From: Trial153
31-Aug-19
What a great tread.

From: The rookie
31-Aug-19
Great story and thanks for taking the time to share it.

From: goelk
31-Aug-19
Great day

From: Buffalo1
31-Aug-19
Incredible adventure and such a super trophy. Congrats Thanks for sharing with us on Bowsite and don't stay away so long.

From: Kurt
31-Aug-19
Congratulations Ken!!! Great ram and hunt! And super writeup about the adventure!

From: Beav
01-Sep-19
Congrats on the ram and great adventure. Thanks for sharing!

From: M.Pauls
01-Sep-19
Just awesome!!! Congrats and way to push through. I can’t imagine being violently ill in the middle of nowhere on the mountain. True grit! Thanks so much for sharing, Russia has always intrigued me, but is so far out of my reach at this stage in the game for me. Stories like yours keep poor guys like me going!!! Thanks again, fantastic recap!

From: Bou'bound
01-Sep-19
Great job. Excellent story

From: Bake
01-Sep-19
Congrats on an awesome ram!

From: INbowdude
01-Sep-19
Hey Spiral Horn, Great story. How about some logistics like costs, shipping trophies home, etc. Any of those thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks and congrats.

From: Spiral Horn
01-Sep-19

Spiral Horn's Link
Hey Folks - here is a link to a 4K quality video of a 2018 hunt in exactly the same area where I took my Ram. In fact, they take this Ram on exactly the same mountain where I took mine. The mountain can be seen over Max’s left shoulder as he is talking while they are sitting and glassing. The soundtrack is a bit cheesy, but it’s a great quality video, both English and Russian being spoken, but the Russian is cc’d in English and vice-versa.

The Ram taken here is probably about the median-average taken, 10-11 year old with good mass - very nice trophy.. I just got lucky and we found an old-timer. They took this Ram on day 1 or 2 of Eduardo’s hunt. Mine was on day 9. Max mentions it was a marathon in the mountains. We did 15+ miles RT the day we took my Ram.

Anyway, I think it’s a great video that gives a good perspective. Enjoy!!!

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