Tight Spot Quivers
Vortex steel 125 grain performance
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
DConcrete 31-Aug-19
Ward's Outfitters 01-Sep-19
GF 01-Sep-19
DConcrete 01-Sep-19
DConcrete 01-Sep-19
GF 01-Sep-19
Matt 01-Sep-19
Ward's Outfitters 01-Sep-19
DConcrete 01-Sep-19
Bowfreak 01-Sep-19
kota-man 01-Sep-19
krieger 02-Sep-19
midwest 02-Sep-19
BOWNBIRDHNTR 03-Sep-19
From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19
This is going to be a quick review Of the performance I experienced with this Broadhead.

A little background: I have always shot fixed blade heads. Began with the original snuffers. I loved the 145 grain head. Shot it for many years with great success. Switched over to the snuffer ss. I killed many many animals with that head as well. For my own reasons, I switched to the slick trick magnum 125. I have had excellent results with this head.

I have watched Steven Ward, who is a sponsor here, post about his company, vortex.

I was amazed at the results out of this head. It performed flawlessly. And the blades Performed exactly how they’re supposed to. They didn’t break, one was bent very severely. But what that blade went through, I can’t blame it.

I shot this antelope from a ground blind at 53 yards. The antelope absolutely did move on the shot and that is critical in this story because when they move, a sizable amount of energy is taken away from the arrow.

This Broadhead cut his leg bone in half, went through the chest cavity, and was only stopped on the other side because of the shoulder blade. Normally, it would’ve certainly had enough energy to go through the shoulder blade, but the energy taken away not only by the animal moving, but by also cutting his leg bone in half.

This is the Broadhead if choice for me now. I only tell you guys my results because if you’re looking for a new head, particularly a mechanical, I highly recommend giving the vortex head a very serious look.

From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19

DConcrete's embedded Photo
DConcrete's embedded Photo

From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19

DConcrete's embedded Photo
DConcrete's embedded Photo

From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19

DConcrete's embedded Photo
DConcrete's embedded Photo

From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19

DConcrete's embedded Photo
DConcrete's embedded Photo
This is the exit where it hit the opposing shoulder blade. Blood loss and damage was staggering.

From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19

DConcrete's embedded Photo
DConcrete's embedded Photo
The leg bone that was cut in half.

From: DConcrete
31-Aug-19

DConcrete's embedded Photo
DConcrete's embedded Photo

01-Sep-19
Congratulations on the Antelope. Thanks for posting the great results of Vortex broadheads. They are designed not to break when encountering hard bone.

From: GF
01-Sep-19
Let me play devil’s advocate for a moment....

From what I can see there, one of your snuffers, hitting in the same place, would have missed the bone entirely and sailed on through.

It seems at least LIKELY that your shot deflected upward off of that bone; given the design of the head, it’s almost guaranteed.

Blood under the shoulder blade: that’s what happens when you don’t get an exit.

Blood loss in general - all animal’s die when they have lost enough blood, and it is generally the same % of total blood volume. The big variable is how hard the fight-or-flight response has kicked in. A big mechanical is virtually guaranteed to break at least two ribs on the way in and on the way out, slamming the animal very hard twice. That’s why mech-shot animals always blow out of there like they’ve been shot from a cannon. Plus, animals that are aware of something sticking into them (like an arrow) are basically getting the whip for their entire run.

Math Problem: If they bleed twice as fast and run off three times as fast, will your blood trail be easier or harder to follow? And what if much of that bleeding is internal due to failure to exit?

Durability: this was a Sage Goat. On a big deer or larger, do you think you would’ve broken that bone? Or would you have been better off sliding around it/missing it entirely? Because if you had hit it solidly with pretty much ANY head, the bone would have broken exactly the same. Question is, would the Broadhead have held up as well on a bigger animal? Or would the head have tripped over that bone, maybe penetrated just enough to break a rib or two and damage the near-side lung a bit, and allowed the animal to gimp off with a massive flesh wound and feed the coyotes?

One thing that wide-cut mech users seem not to want to think about is that anything that increases your chances of slicing through something vital EQUALLY increases your chances of hitting something NON-vital, which increases resistance, which increases the chances of failure to penetrate, which increases the adrenaline levels in the animal, which increases the distance and speed at which it’ll run, which thins out your blood trail. And makes for lower-quality meat on your table.

From: DConcrete
01-Sep-19
GF, I’ve seen a lot of posters on this site. And I’ve seen a lot that bloviate a lot. And I’ve see a lot that know so much that ain’t so. But you truly take the cake. If you can’t look at that damage, and what the Broadhead went though, and admit it was amazing, then don’t respond to the thread. The arrow is on an uphill angle because the antelope was uphill. But do not allow the facts to get in the way. Only allow your version of the facts to get in the way.

It didn’t deflect, it’s a proven head just the same as many many other fixed heads and mechanicals. Get over yourself. You’re not as brilliant as you think you are.

From: DConcrete
01-Sep-19
And lest we forget, the leg bone in an antelope is extremely dense. On a large deer, I absolutely would’ve had the same results. On an elk, it wouldn’t have mattered the set up. But keep telling yourself you would.

By the way, since you’re all knowing, what was my setup? Lbs, draw length, draw weight, arrow weight, etc...

From: GF
01-Sep-19
Doesn’t matter what your set-up is. Either the arrow has enough momentum to break the bone or it doesn’t. Some of the single-bevel guys say that their heads are better at splitting heavy bone than double-bevel heads and they may have a point, but here we’re talking about a chisel tip, so unless you have pictures showing that the bone here was sliced through by the blade and not shattered by the tip, the result would have been the same with any chisel tip design. And if you can clearly show that the blade had to get through the bone, there is then no doubt that you had a massive lateral deflection force applied to the arrow because Physics clearly states that it could not be otherwise.

And FWIW ... I don’t think I’m all that brilliant. I’m just a cranky, middle-aged guy who was trai e as a scientist and who understands how all that stuff he learned in school plays out in real life and how that can lead to misinterpretations of anecdotal evidence.

Yes, that Vortex SURE DID leave a great big hole and a lot of bloodshot to clean up. There; we agree. You happy now?

Good. Now explain to me how that goat is any more dead than it would have been if you had made the same hit with a standard 2-blade or one of those Snuffers that you used so successfully for so long.

Because if you think that that broadhead’s performance was “amazing” - as opposed to exactly what you ought to expect from a low heart/ double-lung hit that went slightly wrong - then you must have expected a whole lot less from THAT broadhead than you would expect from a standard design.... which does tend to make a rational person wonder why you’d have chosen that one in the first place.

From: Matt
01-Sep-19
Congrats on the antelope. I had a similar result on a Mountain Caribou a few years back. Just as I shot the bull turned into the arrow so it hit him quartering too. The Vortex 125 gr. steel travelled through most of the length of his torso and shattered the offside rear leg (femur). Fantastic broadhead!

01-Sep-19
GF You sir clearly have ZERO experience with Vortex broadheads. The entrance hole of a Vortex broadhead at a perfect broadside shot would be approximately 1". And because of the blade design and angle will not deflect. You are correct in this case any broadhead would have killed this goat. But with that said 95% of the mechanical heads on the market would have blown to pieces encountering that hard of bone. Vortex broadheads don't and will not break. The materials used to build them are far superior to all other mechanical broadheads.

From: DConcrete
01-Sep-19
I am very impressed with the Broadhead. The density of an antelope leg bone is amazing and what the one blade did to the leg was awesome. The chisel point didn’t hit the leg bone. It was a single blade that cut it in half. The picture is on this thread, and folks can take it for what it’s worth. Thanks guys!

From: Bowfreak
01-Sep-19
Nice buck Jeff. Vortex are loaded in my quiver too. They are great heads.

From: kota-man
01-Sep-19
Been using these since last year. Killed a couple animals with them...totally impressed, similar results to yours. Will continue to shoot Vortex...awesome heads.

From: krieger
02-Sep-19
Great report DC !

From: midwest
02-Sep-19
Lots of advantages to a mech that make them an excellent choice for antelope. Low profile for less wind drift, more forgiving on the longer shots, big cut puts them down fast. Proof's in the pudding. Nice work, Jeff!

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
03-Sep-19
Great review DC. I'll take your visual, hands on evidence over the scientist GF's schooling any day. I'm always looking to hire the guy that learned everything in a classroom over the person with real world experience....

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