Summit Treestands
Oxygen Canisters in High Country
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Mule Power 09-Sep-19
jordanathome 09-Sep-19
GF 09-Sep-19
Franklin 09-Sep-19
Mule Power 09-Sep-19
GF 09-Sep-19
Herbhunter 09-Sep-19
WI Shedhead 09-Sep-19
PushCoArcher 09-Sep-19
jordanathome 09-Sep-19
jordanathome 09-Sep-19
Mule Power 09-Sep-19
Firsty 09-Sep-19
jordanathome 09-Sep-19
wyobullshooter 09-Sep-19
DL 09-Sep-19
IdyllwildArcher 09-Sep-19
cnelk 09-Sep-19
Teeton 10-Sep-19
Mule Power 10-Sep-19
LINK 10-Sep-19
PECO 10-Sep-19
Teeton 10-Sep-19
>>>---WW----> 10-Sep-19
From: Mule Power
09-Sep-19

Mule Power's embedded Photo
Mule Power's embedded Photo
At my local grocery store the other day I saw a display with Boost Oxygen for sale. I’m wondering if anyone has tried it in the higher elevations since oxygen is less up there and our muscles burn so much of it. I’m thinking they use it climbing mountains like Everest so it should help us go the extra mile.

From: jordanathome
09-Sep-19
I giggle every time I see these on the shelves for the tourists.

For sure give them a try coming from down low but it won't cure the problem only alleviate it momentarily.

One of my buddies used to bring a whole medical grade o2 bottle and mask up to camp for the evenings and it did help him sleep......initially......but you either have to wear it all the time or just get a few "sips" in camp to ease the altitude symptoms for a minute or two. Better yet, plan the time in to acclimate before going hard at altitude.

From: GF
09-Sep-19
You’ve got to be $#!++!%€ me.....

Why don’t you just strap a rifle onto your drone and hunt from your La-Z-Boy like all the legends did?

OK, OK,OK.... I realize that a drone is Over The Line for you.....

But do tell..... What ISN’T?

From: Franklin
09-Sep-19
The only cure for altitude is acclimatization. It`s a blood chemistry deal and like Jordan said....a "sip" won`t help that.

We had to go hard last week as the elk, the heat and the blowdowns were not cooperating. Just 'bite down on the mouth piece' and go.

From: Mule Power
09-Sep-19
GF you could use it as a turbo charger. A quick blast into your intake manifold and your supercharged mountain climbingmobile will rocket you to the top like George Jetson. For God’s sake it’s 2019 why walk anywhere!!!

From: GF
09-Sep-19
No, thanks! It’s already far too easy to get myself INTO a spot that I would have a hell of a time trying to get an Elk OUT OF.

Last thing I need is Inflated Ego In a Can.....

From: Herbhunter
09-Sep-19
It takes the human body a minimum 30 days to truly acclimate to an increase in elevation. Be smart, camp low, stay hydrated, and take Diamox. This idea of get there a few days early and acclimate, funny.

From: WI Shedhead
09-Sep-19
My buddy that gets extreme altitude sickness every year tried the oxygen last year. No change. He still spent 2 days in the tent puking yellow bile before he was acclimated

From: PushCoArcher
09-Sep-19
They sell bottled water by the case why not canned air?

From: jordanathome
09-Sep-19

jordanathome's Link
Acclimatization The major cause of altitude illnesses is going too high too fast. Given time, your body can adapt to the decrease in oxygen molecules at a specific altitude. This process is known as acclimatization and generally takes 1-3 days at that altitude. For example, if you hike to 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), and spend several days at that altitude, your body acclimatizes to 10,000 feet (3,048 meters). If you climb to 12,000 feet (3,658 meters), your body has to acclimatize once again. A number of changes take place in the body to allow it to operate with decreased oxygen.

The depth of respiration increases. Pressure in pulmonary arteries is increased, "forcing" blood into portions of the lung which are normally not used during sea level breathing. The body produces more red blood cells to carry oxygen, The body produces more of a particular enzyme that facilitates the release of oxygen from hemoglobin to the body tissues. Prevention of Altitude Illnesses Prevention of altitude illnesses falls into two categories, proper acclimatization and preventive medications. Below are a few basic guidelines for proper acclimatization.

If possible, don't fly or drive to high altitude. Start below 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) and walk up. If you do fly or drive, do not over-exert yourself or move higher for the first 24 hours. If you go above 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), only increase your altitude by 1,000 feet (305 meters) per day and for every 3,000 feet (915 meters) of elevation gained, take a rest day. "Climb High and sleep low." This is the maxim used by climbers. You can climb more than 1,000 feet (305 meters) in a day as long as you come back down and sleep at a lower altitude. If you begin to show symptoms of moderate altitude illness, don't go higher until symptoms decrease ("Don't go up until symptoms go down"). If symptoms increase, go down, down, down! Keep in mind that different people will acclimatize at different rates. Make sure all of your party is properly acclimatized before going higher. Stay properly hydrated. Acclimatization is often accompanied by fluid loss, so you need to drink lots of fluids to remain properly hydrated (at least 3-4 quarts per day). Urine output should be copious and clear. Take it easy; don't over-exert yourself when you first get up to altitude. Light activity during the day is better than sleeping because respiration decreases during sleep, exacerbating the symptoms. Avoid tobacco and alcohol and other depressant drugs including, barbiturates, tranquilizers, and sleeping pills. These depressants further decrease the respiratory drive during sleep resulting in a worsening of the symptoms. Eat a high carbohydrate diet (more than 70% of your calories from carbohydrates) while at altitude. The acclimatization process is inhibited by dehydration, over-exertion, and alcohol and other depressant drugs.

From: jordanathome
09-Sep-19

jordanathome's Link
What is the outlook for altitude sickness? Most people who get altitude sickness only get the mild form. Symptoms lessen when the person returns to a lower altitude. There are no lasting adverse effects. Even moderate altitude sickness resolves fairly quickly when the affected person descends to a lower elevation. After 2 or 3 days, the person can safely climb to higher elevations if desired.

amusing for sure......

From: Mule Power
09-Sep-19
You guys are thinking too much. I show up days before I hunt. Set base camp. Cut wood. Get past the mild headache phase. Then ride a horse up to a spot and tie off to go take some easy ridge top hikes. My max altitude is 9000 feet. I start my hunting around 7500 for a few days before hitting the higher stuff. By then I’m well acclimated.

But every man has his limits and nobody can go forever without stopping. Distance between breaks gets shorter as your muscles are depleted of oxygen. So you breathe faster but eventually have to stop until your muscles are replenished.

I’m just talking about increasing the distance between breaks and shortening the breaks. Getting to elk faster once I glass them by feeding my muscles more oxygen than the percentage that’s in the air. Not jumping off of an airplane and running up a mountain sucking on a bottle of canned air to skip the acclimation process.

I’ve never had any altitude sickness in 35 years of chasing elk. I can go like a hound dog from the adrenaline after spotting 6 point bulls. I’ve heard about the ugly side effects of altitude sickness meds including not tasting your food or a strange taste in your mouth. I guess if I was prone to altitude sickness I might consider that stuff but I don’t need it at all. But a little octane booster might be interesting.

From: Firsty
09-Sep-19
Sure Herb.......

From: jordanathome
09-Sep-19
Be sure to put out yer cigarette first........jus'sayin. ;)

I think you should go for it MP. Tell us how it works for you. No shame in the o2 game for those coming from lower elevations. Hell I live on the front range and I could definitely feel the elevation at 10600' and above the first 2 days....then I was fine.

I have taken a hit of o2 off my buddy in the past and it was fun for a minute......my experience, and his, is it only lasts as long as you are on the bottle.....then its gone.

09-Sep-19
The trick is to live where it’s 6000’+ to begin with. We’re already oxygen deprived, so we don’t have the sense to realize the difference when we’re at 10,000’. ;-)

From: DL
09-Sep-19

DL's embedded Photo
DL's embedded Photo
Take plenty of these too

09-Sep-19
It affects everyone differently. You need to know how it affects you personally. Most people don't need Diamox. I go to 14K feet without an issue.

But wyobullshooter is absolutely correct. When I lived at 6K feet, I could tell the difference as far as sucking air. The move from 2000 feet elevation to 6000 bought me about 1000 feet of comfort. Now, living 7 months a year at sea level, I've lost that.

Everyone lives where they live though. If it's your first hunt, then a trip beforehand to a similar elevation is really helpful.

And you don't have to hike to 11K feet to find elk. Most elk country at 8-9K feet hold elk in September and there's a ton of elk lower. Look at AZ and NM: most of their elk are between 5-7K feet and Wyoming's trophy units often have the bulk of their elk at that elevation.

Elk will live wherever there's grass, water, and they're not getting killed.

From: cnelk
09-Sep-19
Last Wednesday I drove to my elk unit after work, set up camp at 10,000. Poked around Thursday. Killed my bull Friday morning at 11,000.

From: Teeton
10-Sep-19
It really helps getting a fire started.

From: Mule Power
10-Sep-19
How does you helps Tee? Haha

From: LINK
10-Sep-19
I would say it generally takes me 4-5 days to get “acclimated”. I’m sure I’d be more acclimated after 30 but I’m usually pretty good after 4-5 days.

From: PECO
10-Sep-19
I live at 8,000' and I can feel it when I go to my property at 10,000'

I really don't feel it when I go to sea level for 3 or 4 months then return to 8,000'

From: Teeton
10-Sep-19
IT, IT, IT, Hey Mule, I grew up on the east side of Pa, that makes me almost as dumb as folks on the west side of Pa.. :)

10-Sep-19
Football players use it when they come to Denver. Must be something to it!!!!

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