Sitka Mountain Gear
Hearing aid help
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
lewis 02-Oct-19
2 Points 02-Oct-19
lewis 02-Oct-19
keepemsharp 02-Oct-19
Dale06 02-Oct-19
GF 02-Oct-19
Buffalo1 02-Oct-19
lewis 02-Oct-19
one-eye 02-Oct-19
Woods Walker 02-Oct-19
Muddyboots 02-Oct-19
BigStriper 03-Oct-19
2 Points 03-Oct-19
Buffalo1 03-Oct-19
Dale06 03-Oct-19
one-eye 03-Oct-19
Buffalo1 03-Oct-19
lewis 03-Oct-19
No Mercy 03-Oct-19
Proline 03-Oct-19
jfish 03-Oct-19
lewis 03-Oct-19
From: lewis
02-Oct-19
What hearing aid do you all prefer and is better having a rechargeable or just one where you change batteries.My left ear is almost gone so looks like I’m due.Lewis

From: 2 Points
02-Oct-19
Go get a hearing test from an audiologist. They will usually do it for free. Mine are Signia and are blue tooth. I heard they are about $6000 but, mine were free from the VA

From: lewis
02-Oct-19
I have had the test at Vanderbilt which is a little over 100 miles from us so I know I need one just kinda trying to figure out what to shoot for.Thanks Lewis

From: keepemsharp
02-Oct-19
I have Resound through the VA. They are the ones that fit in the ear not behind the ear, some don't like that kind but with these I get no trouble from windy conditions. Batteries last about a week.

From: Dale06
02-Oct-19
I’m on my second set of Oticon brand. They last five years or so. They are spendy, $6000. I went to audiologist and ran through a lot of tests and that what he recommended. I wanted “in ear” type but the over the ear type has more power and that’s what I needed. I have the battery type and have to change them every five days or so. If you get the battery type, put a few batteries in your vehicles, shave kit etc. they run out at the most opportune times. For the first week or two, they were a pita, but now I really like them. Good luck.

From: GF
02-Oct-19
You really need to match the device to what you need… And your audiologist is your best bet. Start there anyway.... Good ones are NOT cheap, but cheap ones won’t do what you need them to do.

My son’s rechargeable batteries last about a day; usually crap out around 8 PM. Disposables last several days. But his system is really a power-hog - bionic ear implant.

We use the rechargeables day-to-day and set him up with disposables for back-up and overnight trips, etc.

From: Buffalo1
02-Oct-19
1. Go to a trained, certified audiologist (not one of the Beltone, miracle ear sales people) and have a hearing test performed.

I use Resound Brand and love them. They are bluetoothed with my cell phone.

If you are a veteran, go to VA for assitanance. Will save you a lot of $$. I have aids for both ears. Cost approx $5000. Save sales receipt you may qualify for a relief on you annual income tax.

Good luck.

From: lewis
02-Oct-19
Thanks guys great info I know this has been beat to death but all things change so I need all the information I can get Lewis

From: one-eye
02-Oct-19
I am an Audiologist and have hearing loss as well, so maybe I can help. Yes, an Audiologist should be your first choice, as they have the schooling (either a Masters or Doctorate) and training to help you to hear better. If you want to buy a hearing aid, you can get them almost anywhere nowadays at whatever price you want to pay. If you want to hear better, then start with the Audiologist.

The top companies for hearing aids right now are ReSound, Phonak, & Oticon, with Signia and Widex close behind (they are owned by the same parent company now). Starkey used to be good, but my personal opinion is that they are faltering. Most of the other brands of hearing aids on the market today are actually owned by the above companies, or owned by the same parent company (similar to GMC/Chevrolet/Buick/etc.).

You will want rechargeable if you are home every night. If you are camping or traveling or don't have access to a charging port every night, you will want the disposable battery. A rechargeable should give you up to 20 hours of use, and a disposable about a week, give or take. It does vary depending on Bluetooth streaming that you do.

Direct Bluetooth connectivity is pretty universal now as well, but some hearing aids work better than others. If you have an iphone, you use the apple protocol to connect through your menu. Most of the hearing aid companies that have BT connectivity will connect with the iphone, but you still have to talk into the phone so the other person can hear you. If you use an Android phone, with the exception of Phonak, you will have to use a remote control to connect into the hearing aid. The remote control will then pick up your voice when you speak. If you get the Phonak Marvel line, it uses straight BT to connect to both iphone and android phone, and the hearing aid is the microphone and works just like any other BT headset.

For pricing, expect to pay anywhere from $2000-6000 for a set of hearing aids. You can get them much cheaper in places, but what you are paying for is the device plus all the professional services such as proper fitting and verification, adjustments, cleaning, followups, troubleshooting, etc. As mentioned, if you are a veteran, check with the VA first. For a long time, you had to be service-connected for hearing loss to receive hearing aids, but that isn't necessarily the case now. It's worth a phone call to potentially save the $$$. As a side note, the VA only contracts to get the top-line or most advanced technology, so you do get the best hearing aid if you go through them.

Because I have hearing loss, the hearing aid companies are more than happy to send me their product to use, as they know that I will recommend them if I like them. The truth is, when I wear the ReSound, or Oticon, or Phonak, while they all have a slightly different sound to them, I can hear equally well with each of them. But, since I use an Android phone, I keep going back to the Phonak. I really really like the bluetooth in the Phonak.

If you have any questions, or if I missed something, or if you are in Rapid City, SD, let me know.

From: Woods Walker
02-Oct-19
Whaaat???? Lemon aid kelp??? ;-)

From: Muddyboots
02-Oct-19
I have an Oticon with batteries. Works well. I have insurance with GEHA, and they pay something like $3000 towards a set of hearing aids every 3 years. I think Blue Cross does the same. Do use a reputible audiologist. In addition to the proper fitting and setup, I get free batteries, cleaning, adjustments, repairs etc.

From: BigStriper
03-Oct-19
I am 65 and have been wearing hearing aids for 30+ years, my hearing is terrible and I can't hear without them. Yes at times they are a pain in the you know where but I am lost without them. I now have Resound in the ear hearing aids (insurance paid $3000 and I paid $800) they offered a cheaper set and a more expensive set,at my age and just retired I felt the set I got would do just fine and they seem to be doing well. The hearing aids I got work with the Bluetooth and my IPhone,the cheaper set would not. My phone calls come right thru the hearing aids, but I still have to talk into the phone. That works pretty well and other people think your nuts talking to a phone and they can't hear anybody talking on the other end,LOL, unless you unhook that option and turn it back to a regular type call or speaker phone. At one time years ago I tried the behind the ear type hearing aids but at work I was required to wear earmuffs and they didn't work for me, they are suppose to be more powerful ( for people with worse hearing ) like me but I couldn't and didn't like them. I hope I have been of some help, they are at times a pain but if your hearing is bad you need them and they do work, Good luck to All.

Kurt

From: 2 Points
03-Oct-19
one-eye. I heard there is something new to eliminate the tinnitus besides white noise, which is just static to me. Have you heard of this?

From: Buffalo1
03-Oct-19
Great response One-Eye. Super overview of the subject. You are spot on about rechargeable vs batteries.

I order my batteries on eBay. My batteries last 2.5- 3.5 days.

I also have a dehumidifier that helps keep moisture ( rain, fog moisture, sweat) out of batteries. A great assessory.

From: Dale06
03-Oct-19
Buffalo1, pls explain the de humidifier. My aids are over the ear. If I’m working outside in warm weather and sweat, the aids get sweat in them and shut down. Looking for a solution. Thanks

From: one-eye
03-Oct-19
2 Points- I'm not aware of anything that will actually remove or totally eliminate tinnitus. The typical treatment for most people is to provide them with some sort of masking device, meaning a device that will make a different noise that it less-irritating than the tinnitus. For people with tinnitus AND hearing loss, which is the vast majority of those with tinnitus, a hearing aid will bring in enough ambient noise or environmental noise that the mind is taken off the tinnitus and less attention is paid to it. Most of the hearing aids available now also have an actual "tinnitus masker" built into it that can be activated as needed. These can have many different types of masking sounds to them, depending on the preferences of the individual. But, the masker is going to produce some sort of white noise or filtered white noise (i.e. pink noise) or other noise such as nature sounds or ocean waves, which is intended to make the tinnitus less noticeable. For those without hearing loss but who have tinnitus, there are other maskers that you can get, including apps for your phone, that can help.

But, usually once you have tinnitus it is going to be a constant companion, especially if it is due to noise exposure. Speaking generically, without providing a specific treatment plan of course, there are things that can make the tinnitus more noticeable or louder- high blood pressure, stress, fatigue, noise exposure, medications, nicotine, caffeine, or people talking about you.

The American Tinnitus Association is a great resource for education on tinnitus. ata.org is their website. They are consumer driven, not commercially driven, and have lots of good information about current treatments and what can be done for it. But, what works for one person may not work for the next person. Often times a person has to try several different things to find out what, if anything, will work for them. Because tinnitus is not a life-threatening condition for the vast majority of people, it doesn't receive much research funding, so knowledge about the specific physiological causes and therefore treatment is limited.

Above all, use those earplugs to prevent hearing loss and tinnitus in the first place.

From: Buffalo1
03-Oct-19
Dale06

The dehumidifer came with my ReSound hearing aids. I take the batteries out at night and put aids in the machine and hit “on.” The next morning the machine is off and the aids are moisture free. I don’t know how it works- I only know that it does work.

From: lewis
03-Oct-19
One-eye will not ask how you came up with that name but really appreciate your input very professional and informative.If I lived closer to S.D. I would be in touch.Thank you Lewis

From: No Mercy
03-Oct-19
I have Phonak brand rechargable and I really like them. They are not cheap however. I have a back up battery for my charger in case I am without power, and I have the adapter to hook to the TV that streams the TV straight to my hearing aids.

From: Proline
03-Oct-19
I need them but my insurance doesn’t cover a dime so I continue to say .......what all day :-)

From: jfish
03-Oct-19
Been with Phonak recharge model for several yrs. Not what Mother Nature gave you but about as close as possible. They have a recharge station with extended battery pack for those days without power. I get about a weeks worth of recharges for the pack. Whatever you do get a model that has a volume control. Sometimes you really need to turn things down. Some call it the “Wife” setting. Lol........

Two additional things you may want to consider? Phonak has a model that passes some of the “water proof” testing. I required this as I spend a lot of time on the water, out doors, or in wet environments. They claim they are safe for short submersions. I happen to have lost mine in the pool this summer and they sat on the bottom (13’)for just under an hour. I was sure it was going to be a $4000 mistake. Recovered them placed them in a container of rice for 24 hours and they are working fine. Had them checked out by the tech and they test 100%.

A Second feature you may find of value is the ability to select from two programs available in the software. The doc can adjust the units for different environments or activities. After the first yr hunting with them I wanted to enhance the sound/frequency of a deer walking through leaves etc... They created a “Hunting” profile that was more sensitive in those areas and it helped tremendously. I just click over to the program once in the tree.

Good luck

From: lewis
03-Oct-19
Great info all and I appreciate it Lewis

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