Ripcord Arrow Rests
Tradbow noob
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
chasintheslam 27-Nov-19
Highlife 27-Nov-19
BIG BEAR 27-Nov-19
GF 27-Nov-19
chasintheslam 27-Nov-19
fubar racin 27-Nov-19
GF 27-Nov-19
GF 27-Nov-19
Tonybear61 27-Nov-19
BIG BEAR 28-Nov-19
altitude sick 28-Nov-19
Russell 28-Nov-19
chasintheslam 28-Nov-19
Supernaut 28-Nov-19
jrstegner 28-Nov-19
tembow 28-Nov-19
Treeline 28-Nov-19
Kevin Dill 28-Nov-19
PECO 28-Nov-19
Stryker 28-Nov-19
Missouribreaks 28-Nov-19
SixLomaz 28-Nov-19
chasintheslam 28-Nov-19
Heat 28-Nov-19
Rgiesey 28-Nov-19
Glunt@work 28-Nov-19
Phil Magistro 28-Nov-19
Two Feathers 28-Nov-19
Ucsdryder 28-Nov-19
GF 28-Nov-19
Jeff Holchin 28-Nov-19
SixLomaz 28-Nov-19
GF 29-Nov-19
chasintheslam 29-Nov-19
Treeline 29-Nov-19
GF 29-Nov-19
GF 29-Nov-19
Jeff Holchin 30-Nov-19
SixLomaz 30-Nov-19
GF 30-Nov-19
Ambush 30-Nov-19
Treeline 30-Nov-19
White Falcon 30-Nov-19
GF 30-Nov-19
27-Nov-19
Looking to get into trad hunting always been a compound guy but would like to try out a recurve as some added fun to my deer hunting. What is a good starter recurve? I know I'll want to start at like 40# 45#

From: Highlife
27-Nov-19
Try leatherwall better information there.

From: BIG BEAR
27-Nov-19
You can pick up a good used bow like a Bear Grizzly for about $150-175 on EBAY. #45 is a good hunting weight......

From: GF
27-Nov-19
You can always check the leatherwall as well…

First question… Do you have a budget? There are plenty of really good options New under $250, or you can buy something “vintage“, or you can buy something used…

About the only difference is that if you buy something new, it will have a warranty. If you buy something used, you might get something a little prettier with a nicer finish on it. Performance-wise, there is probably not a dime‘s worth of difference…

JMO , you’ll learn faster at a lower draw weight. If you buy a 3-piece takedown, you can “upgrade” to heavier limbs without replacing the whole bow, which can save some $$$.

If you love tinkering with things, you might want to consider an ILF rig, but just the riser will cost as much as a pretty nice Samick.

And just to revisit the question of draw weight… I knew a guy who shot a compound at #80, and a #35 recurve was kicking his ass…

Worst case scenario if you go too light is you have to buy a heavier set of limbs. Worst case scenario if you go too heavy, you never figure it out and give up.

27-Nov-19
Dont really have a budget but would like to stay under 500 the blackwidows look awesome but the price tag is crazy. I have shot a buddies #50 it was ok but I wasnt getting a very relaxed shot. I'm not looking for anything really fancy just a nice one piece or take down to go shoot a couple does with more then likely

From: fubar racin
27-Nov-19
I shoot 80+ pound compounds and swing sledge hammers all day and my 48 pound recurve was EVERYTHING I could handle to start with. I really think I’d have been better off at 35-40 pounds. Also it’s not very “trad” but the clicker on my recurve was absolutely the best thing I ever did for my shot consistency maybe because I’m still a noob too though.

From: GF
27-Nov-19
$500 will buy you a nice used Custom or a very good Starter ILF. I own 3 used customs and 3 “factory” bows and have never spent $500 on a bow yet.....

Widows are well made and marketed even better; the people who love them won’t shoot anything else and a lot of people who used to own one don’t think they’re anything special. I’ve never shot one and don’t care if I ever do....

#40 will kill any deer you hit decently; just use a good COC head and don’t go under 9 GPP. 10 might be better.

Oh, and don’t (whatever you do) buy into that crap about “instinctive“ shooting. If you don’t know where your entire arrow is pointing, you have no way of knowing why you missed your target. Honestly, I think a lot of people would be better off if they started shooting a recurve with a peep and pins, just to get their form down. Then over time they can let go of the sights in whatever order works for them. I know one guy who has recently switched from compound to shooting a recurve three-under, and he is really, really good within his point-blank range.

“Instinctive” is where you end up after you have your form fully ingrained and you don’t have to think about it in order to do it correctly. Until then, the more attention you pay to it, the sooner you will have it right.

I always get a chuckle out of people who think of it as something that they can toy around with, though… “Just shoot a couple of does“…

Take it seriously, and learn how to get within 20 or 25 yards of the animal you’re after. Non-compound bows have been getting it done for about 10,000 years, and the limiting factor in their effective range has been the User from day one.

From: GF
27-Nov-19
A clicker is a perfectly acceptable tool to use in order to establish consistent form. If it weren’t, top-flight target shooters would not use them.

Shooting bare-bow well is a discipline that takes focus and effort. It doesn’t “just happen”, and it is not some Mystical Gift that some are born With and some Without.

It is, however, a hell of a lot of fun!

From: Tonybear61
27-Nov-19
You can get a new Samick takedown with accessories for about $250. Korean but still a good bow. I have several, tweaked the grips slightly for more comfort.

Also can try the used market but might be more difficult to get what you want.

From: BIG BEAR
28-Nov-19
Whatever you choose...... You can get strings and all of the accessories you will ever need on line from Three Rivers Archery. I own a half dozen Grayling Bears.....all older than 1978.....and at one time had a small collection of them....

But recently I’ve been thinking that I sure would like to try a custom longbow from Big Jim’s Bow company........

Have fun with whatever you choose !!

28-Nov-19
I enjoy the instinctive BS also.

Many use the throwing a baseball analogy.

Just like when throwing a ball, after many repetitions a person knows when to release the ball and at what angle. Based on how far you want it to go and what speed you are throwing.

The same with shooting “instinctive”. It’s only instinctive after thousands of shots.

Until you have burned it into the brain. It’s all about form and consistent repetition.

From: Russell
28-Nov-19
I would suggest going to a traditional rendezvous and shoot a variety of bows. It's like test driving a vehicle, they're all not the same.

Keep an open mind about longbows, reflex deflex design ones, along with your traditional recurve. My current favorite is a reflex deflex designed longbow, Osage belly backed with bamboo.

28-Nov-19
Gf thank you for all the info I'm headed to Lancaster tomorrow to get some hands on and see what feels right and I will for sure be serious I shoot everyday as is with my compound

From: Supernaut
28-Nov-19
You're a wise man to head somewhere like Lancaster to get your hands on different "traditional" bows and shoot as many as you can. Hopefully you find one you like and one that works for you. You'll get a lot of advice both good and bad on forums. I made the switch from compounds a few years ago. I found that I have to shoot my recurve a lot more than I ever shot my compound to get and stay proficient with it. I really love shooting so this isn't an issue for me. The best advice I can give you is stick with it, shoot a lot and above all, keep it fun. Good luck!

From: jrstegner
28-Nov-19
If you live in Colorado you have to go to Rocky Mountain Specialty Gear. Hundreds of new and used bows, and excellent instruction.

From: tembow
28-Nov-19
I would suggest trying as many as you can - I shot tons of bows that didn't work for me, kept trying until they fit. turns out I like a high grip which stopped the wrist slapping me. Some bows stacked badly and that can cause the dreaded "hunters paradox" when the time comes to kill and you don't pull it all the way back. Not good...Shooting traditional can be great fun, I have killed several bucks with my recurve and long bow in tree stands during rut - the shots that sometimes takes 1-2 seconds, not sure I could have done those with compound. But I have also watched monsters just out of range....

From: Treeline
28-Nov-19

Treeline's embedded Photo
Treeline's embedded Photo
Treeline's embedded Photo
First group at 20
Treeline's embedded Photo
First group at 20
Treeline's embedded Photo
Second group at 30
Treeline's embedded Photo
Second group at 30
Treeline's embedded Photo
Antler burr knob
Treeline's embedded Photo
Antler burr knob
Lots of great advice above.

I will add that the absolutely best thing you can do to get a jump start would be to take a class with Tom Clum. Incredible teacher and person.

One bow that was not mentioned is the Black Hunter bow. Made in China but very well made and you can get into it really economically. I bought a longbow for my son with 45 and 60 pound limbs for under $200 and was shocked at how well made it was and how well it shot. I customized it a bit with limb savers and antler knobs.

From: Kevin Dill
28-Nov-19
When all is said and done, it's about a bowstring propelling an arrow toward the target. The principles of good shooting don't change much between a compound and a recurve or longbow. What changes the most is the amount of holding weight at anchor, and the fingers release. Combine those 2 things with eliminating the sight (usually) and you're climbing 3 hills at once.

From: PECO
28-Nov-19
Samick Sage is a great bow to start with. I have one and shoot it as much as my other bows. My brother just got one too and is starting to shoot. If you get a sage, throw away the string that comes with it and get a good string.

From: Stryker
28-Nov-19
One point that I did not see touched on was the length of the bow. I’ve been shooting traditional for 30 plus years and absolutely love it. When I started I had no idea what I was doing and struggled for awhile with it until I got together with a couple of friends who had shot traditional. Remember this was way before Bowsite and all of the great information and suggestions that are available today. The main bow I hunt with is a 50lb @ 28” and 62” long. It draws a lot smoother with the longer limbs than my 60in at the same weight but I use it when hunting out of a blind hunting antelope as I have a tendency to have my top limb hit the top if I don’t cant it enough. Your learning curve can be steep but stump shooting for me with friends and like others have said shooting hundreds of arrows was the key ingredient for me instead of just shooting into a target at a set distance. And don’t worry your fingers will get tougher with lots of arrows down range. Good luck and pick a spot.

28-Nov-19
Compton shoots have great bow vendors.

From: SixLomaz
28-Nov-19

SixLomaz's Link
You are lucky to live in CO where RMS Gear is headquartered. Take a ride and play with some bows they have. Good luck.

Rocky Mountain Specialty Gear 4298 Kipling St, Unit B Wheat Ridge CO 80033

Phone: Local - 303-421-2259 Toll Free - 877-843-5559

Email: tg@rmsgear.com

28-Nov-19
I no longer live in colorado

From: Heat
28-Nov-19
Lots of nice vintage bows out there for not a lot of cash. If you like that sort of thing you can't go wrong with an old Kodiak, Grizzly, or Super Kodiak. Good Luck!

From: Rgiesey
28-Nov-19
Clicker is a good deal. I’ve put a sight on my recurve. Shoot ok instinctive but like the sight for hunting. You can build strength for shooting a heavier bow just don’t do it while shooting. We don’t have to buy made in Asia even if it’s a bear on eBay. They were almost indestructible.

From: Glunt@work
28-Nov-19
Another budget bow to consider is the Fleetwood Timberridge. My son shoots one and its looks and shoots really nice. You can get longbow or recurve limbs.

28-Nov-19
If he's in, talk to John Wert. He's on the Trad Tech side and is very knowledgeable and will give you great advice. Lancaster has a good selection of bows. My suggestion is to consider one of their ILF risers that is reasonably priced and get a set of TradTech Black Max wood/glass limbs. Without knowing your draw length, a reasonable choice would be a 19" or 21" riser and medium limbs giving you a 60" or 62" bow. 45# limbs on an ILF setup will give you a couple of pounds adjustment. You'll have to get an understanding of how the ILF system works but it isn't difficult to grasp. Something like the WIn&WIn 21" riser and a set of medium limbs will cost you less than $350 and be a great hunting bow.

The Leatherwall is a good place to get more information.

From: Two Feathers
28-Nov-19

Two Feathers's Link
I recommend the Samick Sage and the Black Hunter. Both come in under $200 at Twig Archery (link). I have a Black Hunter long bow (3 piece) and it out preforms my $700 custom longbow.

From: Ucsdryder
28-Nov-19
You can get a Samick sage off amazon for 78 bucks! Tons of weights to choose from.

From: GF
28-Nov-19
Yes, but if you buy one of those low- priced Samicks,, you may well be getting an older one where the limbs are not compatible with current production, which can cause you a problem if you go to change to heavier limbs later on.

“The same with shooting ‘instinctive’. It’s only instinctive after thousands of shots.

Until you have burned it into the brain. It’s all about form and consistent repetition.”

Exactly! All the people who say you can start there are out of their minds, and yes, that’s the much more diplomatic wording I chose upon further reflection. You don’t learn to play basketball by starting nailing a 3-point, leaping hook shots. Instinctive is where you END UP once your form is so repeatable that you don’t have to think about it anymore.

FWIW, I’m going to disagree with the people who say that you need to try out a whole bunch of different bows and find one that works exactly right for you before you can make a good decision. 30 years ago, I wanted a recurve and I bought one. 15 years later I was still shooting the same bow and very well, thank you very much, if you consider 3” wide groups at 40 yards acceptable. Between my boys and me, we are now up to eight bows in the house, and I can shoot any one of them just fine, thank you, from a #16@22” broomstick longbow to my #55 medium-wrist Recurves to a #62 deep locator R/D longbow. I know a lot of guys who have spent many thousands of dollars buying and selling custom bows, looking for The One magical, mystical Perfect Bow, and it just doesn’t exist.

That said… There’s something about a new bow that brings out the genius marksman in all of us, I think!

28-Nov-19
At my state’s trad archery club (CTA), we always keep a handful of “loaner” bows on hand that newbies could try with a little help/instruction. And just about any shooter would let a newbie shoot their bow and see if they liked it. My son is transitioning from Compound to trad archery so I bought him a Samick Sage - it’s a good inexpensive bow.

From: SixLomaz
28-Nov-19
It does not make sense to buy new custom bows as they tend to drop value fast. Below listed 3 bows can be found on eBay for less then $350. Watch for limb de-lamination, riser drilled holes (repaired or not), vertical cracks in the fiberglass, horizontal stress lines in the limbs, scratches and nicks, and twisted limbs.

Red Wing Hunter recurve (used vintage) - serial number starting with RW produced first by Wing Archery under Bob Lee (look carefully at arrow shelf facing the archer because that is where they crack if they do; not made by Head Ski or AMF Archery they came after original Wing Archery was sold)

Fred Bear Super Kodiak recurve (used vintage) - produced between 1967-1976 - serial numbers starting with K began in 1970 - bow mounted coins were flush with the wood until 1972. In late 1972 the coin was raised above the surface. Brass coin was used in 1963 to 1970 and a nickel-silver medallion was placed on the riser from 1971 to 1972. Starting at the end of 1972, a raised medallion of gold and chrome was used in all Bear bows and is still used today. The Serial Number: These bows ordinarily have, what appears to be a hand inscription on one of the limbs that gives a serial amount along with the distance and pull weight of the bow. This serial amount works very well for dating Bear Bows from 1965-1969 when the first digit of the serial amount is the year of manufacture. For example, a serial amount of 5L212 would be a 1965 Bow. Prior to 1965, the serial numbers for all Bear bows were started over every month, manufacture date for these bows approximately impossible to date by serial amount alone. The "K" series of serial numbers (for example Kz9672) were started in 1970.

Black Hunter reflex / deflex longbow model (new made in China; NOT recurve)

NOTE: I also recommend the White Feather Lark ILF riser 19 or 21 inches for $159.82 USD from http://www.alternativess.com in UK paired with two TradTech Black Max 2.0 Glass/Wood Recurve Limbs for $149.99 from www.lancasterarchery.com. Custom higher price bows are for passionate (addicted) collectors.

P.S. If you are patient, once in a while you can find a good deal, meaning under $500 on a $1000+ custom bow like I did last week with a 50#@28 Toelke Whip reflex - deflex longbow which cost me $479. Now I have to sell two bows to make room in the collection (addicted myself I am).

From: GF
29-Nov-19
I haven’t bought a custom yet.... well, that’s not true - I own 3, but they were all made for someone else!

Of course, I’ve only been doing this for 30 years! LOL

29-Nov-19
So recurve or long bow for hunting? Which ones better

From: Treeline
29-Nov-19
Have more than a few custom bows - Black Widows, Great Plains, Robertson, Big Horns, Howard Hill, self bows, home made, etc. Been shooting trad bows for over 40 years. I gotta say, those Chinese Black Hunters blew me away.

From: GF
29-Nov-19
“So recurve or long bow for hunting? Which ones better”

Ford. No, wait - Chevy! No! Dodge!!

Naw, dang....

Recurves may be a shade faster, but most seem to agree that you’re talking about levels you can only prove with a chrono and a shooting machine when comparing a reflex/reflex (some call them hybrid) LB vs. a standard recurve. Super Recurves are a whole different animal. I’d kinda like to try one out, but I’m kind of afraid to because they don’t actually appeal to me with those ginormous hooks...

And because the string contacts the limb of a recurve, that creates some extra noise, which can be mitigated.

As a rule, a 1-piece longbow is lighter all-up mass weight, and a 3-piece (or whatever limb design) will weigh a lot more, which can make those more stable and easier to shoot accurately.

So this is where you can go kinda crazy trying different styles of bows, but the good news is that whatever you like, you can get one and not worry about losing a whole bunch of speed unless you’re drawn to a really old-school design. But if that’s what you really like, you’ll like that about it anyway....

From: GF
29-Nov-19
And FWIW....

The last bow I bought is a custom which was designed around a short draw length; if I were any taller I couldn’t shoot it at all because it really starts to stack right about the time I am completely at my anchor.

It’s a R/D longbow, 62” and about #62 at my draw. Honestly, the only thing I would consider changing about it is that I wish it were a two piece...

But if I did that to it, I would have zero excuses left for buying any more bows, so…

30-Nov-19
Most trad bowhunters would say that a recurve is better/ more effective for hunting; I agree but think my longbows and several of my selfbows are more fun to shoot.

One thing to keep in mind with trad bowhunting, especially when coming from a compound background: for most of us, the goal/fun is seeing how close you can be to the animal when you shoot it, not how far away.

From: SixLomaz
30-Nov-19
Reflex / deflex longbow is the best of both worlds. Try a Black Hunter longbow.

From: GF
30-Nov-19
“Most trad bowhunters would say that a recurve is better/ more effective for hunting“

Disagree!.... unless you’re talking about people who’ve never shot or read the testing on a modern R/D longbow design.

One qualification on that is that if you prefer a bow with a short overall length, you have to go to a fairly specialized design like Ron La Claire’s Shrew, or you will probably be happier with a recurve, especially if you are a long DL boy.

I have not run across any problems shooting a 62 inch recurve from a tree stand (climber, with a bar/shooting rail) except on one shot that was literally straight down. Never had any problems with it at all in the Elk woods, or even out here in the east…

There is kind of a tipping point on bow length, though.... Too short, and the string will pinch your fingers against the nock; too long, and I find that I have trouble with the string making contact with my clothing across my chest My longest bow is the same height that I am, and I just start having that issue there. 2 inches shorter, and I don’t ever seem to notice it.

From: Ambush
30-Nov-19
I want a bow that either Treeline or Whipranger have touched. Those bow must have some magic deep within!

I have an old Browning Apollo that I bought about thirty five years ago and a warf made from a Bear Black Bear compound riser with a set of 40# Sage limbs and a set of 28# Black Max. I'm going get a still-in-the box Browning Nomad from a friend. My buddy and I have decided to shoot our spring bears with single string again this year, and I'd like to use that Nomad. I'm pretty consistent to fifteen yards using a fixed crawl, but after that I get flyers pretty regular. And just like with a compound, I tend to get really excited right at the shot at animals and can't ever remember bearing down and concentrating. Not the best routine.

I've had bows for sixty years if you count kids fibreglass. But all that experience means nothing if you've been doing it "wrong" all that time. Getting some competent instruction will be your best investment and not from somebody like me with sixty years of experience.

From: Treeline
30-Nov-19
Rod, Whipranger was there when I put together my custom homemade Reflex-Deflex longbow...

His Dad was taught me how it was done and let me use his tools and bow form. I still consider Gary to be one of the best, most consistent bowhunters ever.

That bow has truly been amazing. Killed critters from Argentina to Alaska, field mice to buffalo. She is the most consistent killing bow I have ever shot.

From: White Falcon
30-Nov-19

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo
Stickbow.com, for information. Amazon has the Black Hunter bows for around $125.00. Great bows, I have the long bow and recurve.

From: GF
30-Nov-19
Not for nothin’... if you want that $125 bow a bit more gussied up, you can get it with much nicer wood & finish for an extra $100.... may even shoot a bit better.

  • Sitka Gear