Trekking pole recommendation
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
newfi1946moose 02-Dec-19
Bou'bound 02-Dec-19
Russell 02-Dec-19
standswittaknife 02-Dec-19
Scoot 02-Dec-19
SixLomaz 02-Dec-19
lewis 02-Dec-19
PECO 02-Dec-19
PECO 02-Dec-19
TENPOINT 02-Dec-19
Overland 02-Dec-19
Aubs8 02-Dec-19
kota-man 02-Dec-19
Russell 02-Dec-19
bowbender77 02-Dec-19
Brotsky 02-Dec-19
midwest 02-Dec-19
newfi1946moose 02-Dec-19
newfi1946moose 02-Dec-19
Backpack Hunter 02-Dec-19
Jims 02-Dec-19
Matt 02-Dec-19
76aggie 06-Dec-19
WapitiBob 06-Dec-19
sbschindler 08-Dec-19
newfi1946moose 08-Dec-19
altitude sick 08-Dec-19
Cheetah8799 08-Dec-19
WV Mountaineer 08-Dec-19
newfi1946moose 09-Dec-19
02-Dec-19
Having some difficulty recovering from total hip replacement and have need for a top quality set of poles to help with regaining a somewhat normal stride and walk. Any recommendations would be appreciated.

From: Bou'bound
02-Dec-19
Black Diamond but there are lots of good brands but get lever locks not the twists

From: Russell
02-Dec-19
Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork Trekking Poles are the ones I used during a BC goat hunt. They proved to be very strong and soon became my new bestest friends.

02-Dec-19
Leki or Black Diamond. I like the three piece models for packing. In this area buy once cry once.. I’ve had cheaper models and they didn’t last or were too heavy. I also recommend cork over foam Handles for durability.

From: Scoot
02-Dec-19
Yep, rock solid info above. Those are the two best choices as far as I can tell. I've got cork handled black diamond poles and I love them. I used to mock people who used them (when I was clueless-- I'm only slightly less clueless these days), now I never take a trip without them!

From: SixLomaz
02-Dec-19
Young, bark removed and fire brandished, saplings. If you need to adjust move your hand up / down on the stick.

From: lewis
02-Dec-19
Black Diamond has worked well for me Lewis

From: PECO
02-Dec-19
I like Leki, but there are a few good ones out there. Can't go wrong with Black Diamond either.

From: PECO
02-Dec-19
If you have an REI nearby, go there and check out trek poles. There may actually be someone there that knows what is going on to help you. You don't have to buy there, but you can check out good poles.

From: TENPOINT
02-Dec-19
Leki Micro Vario Carbon used on my Tahr N/Z and on my Wyoming Elk hunt did not fail they fold up and fit in your pack well made product !

From: Overland
02-Dec-19
Absolutely buy a quality pole. The cheap ones (WalMart and the like) perform very poorly. I have a fair amount over 10,000 miles on a pair of Leki Super Makalus and love them. They'll be my poles for life, as they are now an extension of my body whenever I hike. Just this past year I had the first ever issue with them aside from replacing the tips. Even though they are quite old, Leki sent me a replacement part right away, for free. When the same thing happened to the other pole a few months later, the same thing, Leki shipped me a replacement part quickly and for free. You simply cannot beat that for customer service.

I do really like the BD Alpine Carbon Cork poles as well. It is worth noting that carbon is simply not as durable as aluminum. I've never once bent an aluminum pole, and have had them in some seriously rugged terrain. I agree that the lever-lock function is preferable to the twist-lock, although my Leki Super Makalus are twist-lock and I've had no issues.

If you want the absolute lightest pole, the Gossamer Gear trekking poles are the way to go. They're super nice. However, they are not durable. A friend on an expedition with me snapped both of his very quickly while in the Yukon. I would say they're ideal for on-trail applications but for rugged terrain they're not the first choice.

The learning curve on trekking poles, in my opinion, is 200-300 miles. It takes time to learn to use them effectively. I would say that while hiking, 90% of the folks I encounter using poles have their poles adjusted way too long. Look up proper height guidelines. I assure you its shorter than you would think.

Trekking poles make me around 20% faster, save my knees, and have saved me countless sprained ankles. Good luck!

From: Aubs8
02-Dec-19

Aubs8's Link
Here is a previous post.... Cascade Mtn. Tech are the "Cosco Poles", good quality and don't break the bank. Mike

From: kota-man
02-Dec-19
I'm a Black Diamond fan. The Carbon Leki's I've used have all rattled a little bit. Not a lot, just enough to be annoying. I'm currently testing a set of Sky Carbon Evo's (sold on Stone Glacier's Website) and I'm really liking them a lot as well.

From: Russell
02-Dec-19
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Set-of-Black-Diamond-Alpine-Carbon-Cork-Flicklock-100-130-CM-Trekking-Poles/293357676980?hash=item444d7ae9b4:g:gyUAAOSwNNVd5H3W

From: bowbender77
02-Dec-19
Poles made of carbon weigh the least. Black Diamond poles are at a much better price point then Leki and are well made. Three piece poles fold down and pack the best. REI has a house brand of carbon poles that are much like the Back Diamond line. Make sure that you by the correct length of pole to match your height. Rubber tips are a must for a quiet stalk when using poles. Some call trekking poles "sissy sticks" but they are a big help in keeping your balance in rough country with a full pack. They go a long way towards protecting your joints in rough country. Hope this helps some and keep on truckn'.

From: Brotsky
02-Dec-19
I use Montem poles and have had really good luck with them. Not the lightest but durability has been good, they have lever locks, and you can get them with cork handles. I've used mine quite a bit, they are always in my pack, and have not let me down yet.

From: midwest
02-Dec-19
The aluminum Cascade Mountain Tech poles are $23 on Amazon. Cork handles and lever locks. The carbon's are $48.

02-Dec-19
Thanks, guys...lots of good info as you have had experience with such. When doc did the hip he noted that he had never come across a set of leg muscles that atrophied as bad as my right leg had. I am 73 and probably left the hospital too soon as the leg did not drain as should and required second surgery two weeks later. well on the mend but will need to do much more and faster walking and lengthing of stride. Poles will help! I am determined to climb some of the foothill mountains where I used to live in upstate NNY this coming summer. My father helped build some of the fire towers on them in the CCC camps. Also, I feel another moose trip to NL in the bones.

02-Dec-19
Abus8... thanks for that link...will read it asap...seems lots of info there also.

02-Dec-19
I like Black Diamond, but I think the most important thing is to get the lever locks instead of the twist locks.

From: Jims
02-Dec-19
You can usually get killer deals on Leki poles on Sierra Trading....around 1/2 price or better. I've used and abused my Leki's from ST for the past 10 years and they've done me well on sheep and mtn goat hunts here in Colo and Alaska.

From: Matt
02-Dec-19
I.like Black Diamond but admittedly I like their newer ones less than their older ones in every regard. Flick locks are where it is at.

From: 76aggie
06-Dec-19
I was never a real fan of trekking poles until this past fall. Pretty much thought it was extra and unnecessary equipment. Man was I wrong! My son in law gave me a nice pair and I cannot remember the name but they are of excellent quality. They do not twist, but lever lock. If you have never tried them, you should strongly consider. I won't hunt in hills or mtns again without them.

From: WapitiBob
06-Dec-19
Costco, $25; carbon/cork handles

From: sbschindler
08-Dec-19
I have some hungry hikers not sure how they rank among other hiking poles but they seem to work well for me they are very lite,

08-Dec-19
Thanks, guys, for all the info. Just passed a wish list of those poles recommended under the wife's nose and will await Santa.

08-Dec-19
Backcountrygear.com Has BlackDiamond sticks 25% off.

From: Cheetah8799
08-Dec-19
I used recycled graphite golf club shafts that I got for free from a local course. Added cheap trekking pole tips. Worked great! Saved my knee a lot of pain, will make more to have spares in the future if needed. Fell coming down a wet hill landing on it, no damage, not sure an aluminum pole would have survived.

08-Dec-19
Man, just go buy a pair from somewhere and use them. Buy what you want but, hiking to get into shape doesn't require a master guide's resume of gear. And, you'll wear the tips very quickly if hiking on hard ground like a track or asphalt road. On any brand. And, the cheapo's won't break using them in that scenario. I've used $15 ones and $100 pairs owned by friends training and packing. I currently use a pair of cascade carbons. They work just fine for packing heavy loads as well.

09-Dec-19
WV...Just got on the laptop and have been looking at the Cascade carbons you mentioned. Academy Sports has them in stock and Amazon has the whole package for around $48 taxes inc. Just sent the order in. Others seem good but a bit outside the budget.

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