Mathews Inc.
Lone Wolf Sit and Climb Platform Tilt
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Bowfreak 02-Dec-19
BackStraps 02-Dec-19
Overland 02-Dec-19
midwest 02-Dec-19
Bloodtrail 02-Dec-19
Bowfreak 02-Dec-19
Franklin 04-Dec-19
timex 04-Dec-19
Ghost425 04-Dec-19
cnelk 04-Dec-19
PSUhoss 04-Dec-19
sticksender 04-Dec-19
Ghost425 04-Dec-19
BackStraps 04-Dec-19
jstephens61 04-Dec-19
Candor 04-Dec-19
Genesis 05-Dec-19
PSUhoss 05-Dec-19
timex 05-Dec-19
mountainman 05-Dec-19
Cornpone 05-Dec-19
Roger that 05-Dec-19
Bowfreak 05-Dec-19
jstephens61 05-Dec-19
Jethro 06-Dec-19
Candor 06-Dec-19
mountainman 06-Dec-19
jstephens61 06-Dec-19
jstephens61 06-Dec-19
PSUhoss 06-Dec-19
cnelk 06-Dec-19
timex 06-Dec-19
JLeMieux 06-Dec-19
oldgoat 07-Dec-19
Roger that 07-Dec-19
Roger that 07-Dec-19
Ambush 07-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Bowfreak 11-Dec-19
PSUhoss 11-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 11-Dec-19
Bowfreak 11-Dec-19
cnelk 11-Dec-19
WV Mountaineer 11-Dec-19
Shawn 12-Dec-19
WV Mountaineer 12-Dec-19
jstephens61 12-Dec-19
Fields 12-Dec-19
Ambush 12-Dec-19
cnelk 12-Dec-19
Ambush 12-Dec-19
Cheesehead Mike 13-Dec-19
From: Bowfreak
02-Dec-19
I found an area I wanted to hunt and am going to use my LW Sit and Climb instead of putting up a hang on. One of the things I have noticed about this stand versus previous climbers I have had is that I can't seem to get enough upward tilt into the platform initially due to the cross bar on the platform contacting the tree. I am not one for adjusting in mid air so I think I'll add a rope step to my setup which will allow me to start my platform higher on the tree. By starting higher on the tree I can cinch the traction belt a bit tighter and end up with a more level platform when I reach my desired height. Does anyone do this and if so....is the Cranford the only strap on step now? I could put a screw in step in my pack but they can be a bear to start in some trees like maple or hickory and they aren't legal on public land.

From: BackStraps
02-Dec-19
I tighten mine down multiple times on the way up. The adjustable straps that connect upper to lower come in handy for making this safe and easy.

From: Overland
02-Dec-19
I adjust my hand climber platform on the way up. It's awkward but it works for me.

From: midwest
02-Dec-19

midwest's Link
Check out Wild Edge Stepps. You can actually get 2 feet on them. You can buy a single for $20. I have 8 of them.

I can send you one to try if you want, Mark.

From: Bloodtrail
02-Dec-19
I just started mine up higher on the tree. Sometimes I would start it at chest height and use the seat as a chin-up bar on the tree at 90 degree offset and swing up onto the foot portion. I’d put the seat up over my head at the highest I could reach. Backstraps, how do you change the tightness of the belt/strap on the foot portion as you climb?

From: Bowfreak
02-Dec-19
Nick,

Those are sweet steps and are too nice for what I need. I only need a simple step to get me 3' off the ground. Thanks for the offer, but I can get one of the Cranford strap on steps for $8 or $9 and I won't be breaking up your set.

Bloodtrail,

The simplest movements aren't as easy as they used to be for me. LOL. I used to just jump up to the platform and land on my butt and then just stand up. I can still jump up there, but it now hurts like crap to try to roll around on my knees and stand up. It's like a beached whale struggling to find the sea. :)

I will give this a try. Not at the top of my climb but at like 4' off the ground.

From: Franklin
04-Dec-19
I would love to see this "platform adjusting as you climb" too. Maybe the seat portion but without getting off of it I don`t see how you can adjust the platform.

From: timex
04-Dec-19
I hunt all private land & always use a screw in step. I set my stand slightly above waist high & use the step this has worked well for me

From: Ghost425
04-Dec-19
Always start my climb with the climber pointing upwards at the steepest angle possible at about waist hieght. Once on the platform, I climb to desired height. Have noticed that if you don’t start with the steep upward angle that the platform will point downward by the time you reach your desired height.

From: cnelk
04-Dec-19
^^^ Yep. This. Both platform and seat start at a steep angle.

From: PSUhoss
04-Dec-19
Adjusting the platform while on the way up the tree isn't that difficult once you get the hang of it. Some trees are just impossible to get level at desired stand height even if you start with the steepest angle possible at the bottom. All trees are different.

When adjusting the platform, I just remain seated on the bar used to climb and pull the platform up to me with the stabilizer straps and tighten the traction belt to the desired angle. Once you get good at it, I do it all of the time not only to adjust the angle of the platform, but to go around limbs while on the way up. No big deal after a while. Love my Lone Wolf Stands.

From: sticksender
04-Dec-19
Agree with PSU....with the sit n climb, adjusting the platform angle or seat angle during the climb is no problem. Of course you want to be fully harnessed to the tree while doing so. For me, even when starting the stand at the steepest angle possible at the base of the tree, it is a rare tree that allows the angle to end up being perfect at the final height.

From: Ghost425
04-Dec-19
I agree with the above statements as well about adjusting on the climb. The straps are super handy.

From: BackStraps
04-Dec-19
X2 to PSUhoss.

Probably doesnt work with the hand climber, but is a piece of cake with sit and climb.

I don’t understand the earlier question about foot straps. I don’t use foot straps with my sit and climb my feet lift by slipping between the lower crossbar and the platform.

From: jstephens61
04-Dec-19
All that seems like a PITA. After a half a dozen trees or so, got the hang of what angle the platform should be to start. Usually end up with the platform level or pointed up.

From: Candor
04-Dec-19
I know this is a bit off topic, Lone Wolf is very functional in a lot of capacities. But other than packing flat there is not much about it that I find desirable. Other stands - Summit, TreeWalker, and Loggy Bayou are my preferred stands over my LW because of how it fits the tree and climbs (or does not comparatively).

From: Genesis
05-Dec-19
I’ll continue to post every year that Lone Wolf makes a poor climber compared to others out there.Hunters get sucked in by the sexy looks and flat pack in and then fight them the rest of the time

From: PSUhoss
05-Dec-19
Genesis - I would like to hear what you think makes them a poor climber. Not trying to be argumentative, but I have owned one of possibly every climber manufacturer made and keep coming back to Lone Wolf. My primary reason is the they are dead quiet and that trumps most everything else.

From: timex
05-Dec-19
I'm not gonna comment on any others cause I haven't used them I will say that iv had a sit n climb since 2005 & I go up a tree effortlessly with it & am as comfortable 25' up as standing on the ground & ABSOLUTELY silent. as far as that angle to set the stand you'll learn quickly it depends on the tree a pine poplar or smooth bark hickory for instance that has very little taper will require far less starting angle than a tree that tapers quickly going up

From: mountainman
05-Dec-19
I'm with Timex. Bought my LW climber in 2001. Still going strong. It's finally starting to make some creaks. It may be time to replace all the washers etc.

Most of the time I end up level. On occasion I have to climb back down and re adjust.

From: Cornpone
05-Dec-19
I've used climbing treestands for many years...starting off with the Baker Mighty-Mite...remember those beauties LOL!! I've had several over the years and currently have my last...a LW Alpha, not the Sit and Climb. Anyhow, I numbered my belt such that when I climb a tree I know what number I want to set it at if I climb that same tree again. As far as adjusting the angle, if it starts off too steep I make an aerial adjustment when no more than 5 or 6 feet off the ground so I'm not concerned about falling. I also have my safety harness attached as I climb. Yes...there are lighter stands out there but, IMO, none quieter nor less cumbersome to carry, which means a lot to me.

05-Dec-19
Haha how many of these lone wolf haters have a beer gut so big they can’t see their pecker? Lone wolf by far is best climber made. End. Of. Story. Just because your outta shape don’t knock the climber!! Haha

From: Bowfreak
05-Dec-19
This is my favorite climber I've ever owned. I added a Hazmore Seat to mine. I know some people don't like this style of seat, but I love them. It is comfortable and not bulky to pack. To me it is a huge difference maker as the climbers I had in the past were so big and bulky to pack that I'd end up leaving them at the house. The last climber I had was a Summit Sentry. It was probably the most comfortable stand I had ever set in, but the stand was super bulky to pack and nesting the hand climber to the platform was loud and required more effort than I like. I admit I am not a climber expert, but this is what I saw.

As far as comments about starting the platform angled high enough in the beginning......that is what I always did with any other climber I had. It may have been the particular tree I was climbing, but I started the platform angled up as high as possible. It couldn't increase the level more without the cross bar on the platform contacting the tree.

From: jstephens61
05-Dec-19
Have to agree with PSUhoss, I’ve owned around 8 other climbers, starting with a Baker. Right now I have a LW Assault climber and a Summit Viper. The Viper is a very comfortable stand, but it’s heavy noisy and a PITA to hook to the tree. It comes out maybe twice a year, the LW, 4-5 times a week this year. Quietest stand I’ve ever owned. Looking into getting the sit n climber portion to go with the Assault. Anybody want to buy a Viper?

From: Jethro
06-Dec-19
For you guys that love the LW, do you not have the problem that Bowfreak asked about? Can you get enough upward angle at initial attachment (at ground level)? I only ask cause if I ever get another climber, LW would be my choice. But I don't want one where I have to use an extra tree step or do a pull up to get onto the platform. Maybe Bowfreak just has a freaky tree? I only use mine few times a year so my 20 year old API has been good enough.

From: Candor
06-Dec-19
"Haha how many of these lone wolf haters have a beer gut so big they can’t see their pecker? Lone wolf by far is best climber made. End. Of. Story. Just because your outta shape don’t knock the climber!! Haha" Roger that... I am 6'1" and 190 lbs with a 34" waist. I like long walks on the beach and sunsets in the outdoors. But since I don't emotionally attach myself to my hunting equipment we probably wouldn't be a match on Tinder.

In all seriousness you do sort of raise a decent point. Not necessarily about my physical conditioning but perhaps about geometry. At 6'1" I am probably on the taller side of average. One of the things I don't like about the LW is the interaction of my knees with the tree for trying to make longer pulls with the bottom section. The sit bar on the LW is closer to the tree than on my other "sit and climb" style stands (Treewalker and Summit). So I am able to make long descent/ascents with it in a given rep. My loggy bayous is a hand climber which doesn't give me the same conflict with my knees and the tree as I am starting with my knees much lower from the hand piece and they don't pull up as tight to the tree at the upper end of the rep. My ability to clearly describe this needs some work.

I wear a size 13 shoe which I think gives me a bit more leverage on the degree to which I can control the bottom portion of the stand. I think this aspect helps.

So my complaints about the LW sit and climb would be: 1) You are sitting close to the tree when you climb and it impedes a taller guy's knees when trying to pull the bottom piece close to the top piece and covering more altitude per rep. 2) The band that goes around the tree on the LW is not as stiff as the band on the TreeWalker or Summit. So the band is more awkward trying to maneuver it around branch stobs or heavily barked trees. 3) The angled pieces on the bottom piece (that go from the platform to the band) are not deep enough for my preference when I am wearing insulated boots. 4) I have had the LW platform shift slightly on me when moving around on it while hunting. I do use the cinch down steps. I have this same problem with my Loggy Bayou. The TreeWalker does not ever have this problem. Essentially it (the LW) is not as tightly locked to the tree to enable me to do gymnastics if I am trying to shoot around the back of the tree or lean out.

I believe there is not "one best" tree stand. As the old song goes "there ain't no free" and the positive attributes of stands usually have an accompanying negative. The question is simply whether the negative is of little consequence to your application or is outweighed by the positive.

And "Roger that"...if you are able to get by that emotional identity with your hunting equipment, don't forget about that size 13 shoe of mine ... ;)

From: mountainman
06-Dec-19
Most trees(I'd say 90%) I can get the angle high enough initially to level out at the top. The other 10% I either have to readjust a couple feet higher(safety harness attached) or start it almost level because the tree doesn't taper much(rare).

From: jstephens61
06-Dec-19
Candor, I’ve never had those issues with my Assault climber, but it’s not the sit n climb. We’re about the same size, so that’s good to know.

I had a Loggy 20 years ago and it was a good stand, unless it was raining or trying to climb a hard back hickory. The climbing bar was noisy and inconvenient once you were up and settled in. Tried hugging the tree, but that was a joke. I’ve also seen the pins that secured the band sheer off. Not good. Below 20 degrees it would creak and pop when I stood. I’ve never heard a sound out of my LW. Much easier for me to hook up to the tree and I’ve never had to carry an extra step. Like I said, I’ve had it on enough trees to know about what angle to start it at.

Not emotionally attached to the stand or the brand. I learned a long time ago, buy once-cry once. It’s been one of the best equipment purchases I’ve ever made. If something better comes out, I’ll try it. I just haven’t seen anything better. Yet.

From: jstephens61
06-Dec-19
BTW, can you even buy a Loggy now? Thought they went out of business 10 years ago.

From: PSUhoss
06-Dec-19
Candor - We are about the same height, weight, and shoe size. Of all of the issues that you posed, the only one that I have experienced is the first one on your list.

What has helped me in the past is to be sure that the "bar" that holds the sit sling is level and every little bit helps. This puts the pivot point of the sling as far as possible from the tree. Us taller guys have to be sure and make sure that the top portion of the climber is not tipped up or down to get you further from the tree. Just something for you to check next time you are using it. Also, the more narrow the tree is, the easier it will be for your knees to clear the sides of the tree. Never had any of the other issues that you describe in regard to insulated boots, stand movement, or issue with the traction band (maybe they need replaced?).

Mountainman - I agree with you percentages as well. 9 out of 10 trees there are no issues and no need to adjust the stand on the way up. Only the trees with a pronounced taper at the bottom typically require the stand to be adjusted. After a while, adjusting the stand is no big deal.

From: cnelk
06-Dec-19

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
This is how I start with my XOP (LW) tilted

From: timex
06-Dec-19
it simply varies from tree to tree if you start with a lot of tilt on a telephone pole straight tree when you get up your gonna have nearly the same tilt you have to estimate the tilt for each different tree & with experience you'll get better at it

From: JLeMieux
06-Dec-19
Bowfreak, have you considered something like the aiders used on climbing sticks. You could attach it around the tree above your platform and to the side or possibly rotate the top section 90 degrees and attach the aider to it some how. This would be a lightweight, public land legal option. If you use a lifeline you could possibly have a long loop to clip into the prussic. More like the aiders that stay attached to the foot instead of a specific step

In the swamps we deal with this a good bit because the bases of the trees can be so swollen. I have thought about the aider but haven't tried it yet. I don't have a LW, so I haven't been limited by the cross bar. Consequently, the platform can be so steep, it's very tough to get strapped in.

From: oldgoat
07-Dec-19
I hunt from Cottonwoods, rarely can I find one that I don't have to cheat a little at the bottom. I just keep two screw in steps in my pack. Really helps out!

07-Dec-19
Candor that’s pretty funny! Ya 6’1” might be little tough, I’m 5’9” 175# chiseled n tan! Wear a flat brim hat n shoot a Hoyt, I’m on keto too.

07-Dec-19
Size 13 shoe, man that’s big. Feel bad for wife or gf wink wink*(shoes must be expensive is what I mean )

From: Ambush
07-Dec-19
Two things I see in cnelk's picture. The protective tubing around the bottom belt and the tension straps are cam buckle type. I've broken several of the plastic buckles on my LW, usually from throwing it around when it's folded.

I've had the LW hand climber for many years and always carry a couple of steps to get the platform just above the root bulge. One two step climbing stick would do the same. That gets my platform about armpit level.

11-Dec-19

11-Dec-19

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Bowfreak, here's my solution to getting into the stand when the base of the tree is too big. I have an "aider" that I originally made to use with climbing sticks. It's a piece of tubular webbing with a piece of hose inside of it to create the stirrup. It weighs next to nothing and I just leave it attached to the platform at all times now.

11-Dec-19

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Or if you want some additional height you could go this route. This is an aider I use with my climbing sticks all the time. It's just some rope with the rungs made out of schedule 40 PVC wrapped with camo tape.

11-Dec-19

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Sit on the sit bar, take feet out and let them hang beside platform. Squeeze platform with calves and raise.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Sit on the sit bar, take feet out and let them hang beside platform. Squeeze platform with calves and raise.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Lean against tree with left shoulder, reach down and grab black bar with left hand and pull platform up and hold platform with back of your knees.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Lean against tree with left shoulder, reach down and grab black bar with left hand and pull platform up and hold platform with back of your knees.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Once you have the platform held firmly with back of knees let go of black bar and use both hands to adjust band.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Once you have the platform held firmly with back of knees let go of black bar and use both hands to adjust band.
In regard to adjusting the platform band while I'm climbing, I do it all the time and only takes a few seconds.

11-Dec-19

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
I've had my sit and climb since the first or second year they made them and I've never had any stability or slippage issues and I'm still using the original stabilizer straps with the original plastic buckles.

If you cinch the straps down tight while you're still sitting on the bar with the majority of your weight, when you stand up and put your full weight on the platform it will pull down on the seat section locking everything into place very solidly with very little chance of slippage or wobble.

It probably also helps if the stabilizer straps are attached between the seat and platform as vertical as possible.

11-Dec-19

Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Fanny pack and extra clothes held in place with ATV cargo net works great.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Fanny pack and extra clothes held in place with ATV cargo net works great.
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
Cheesehead Mike's embedded Photo
When it comes to climbers, I don't think you can beat the compactness, quietness and performance of a Lone Wolf sit and climb with a hazmore seat and molle shoulder straps and hip belt.

From: Bowfreak
11-Dec-19
Mike,

That aider on the front of the stand is a perfect touch. I'll add that to my system for sure.

From: PSUhoss
11-Dec-19
Cheesehead - The next time you try to adjust the platform while in the stand, rather than squeezing the platform and lifting it with your feet, just put your legs behind the stabilizer straps and pull the base up to you. Much easier and you can get it closer to you making the access to the cam buckle on the traction band a breeze. Great photos btw.

11-Dec-19
Bowfreak,

I think you'll like it. BTW, I do have some of the Cranford rope on steps and they do work pretty well but for the climber I think the aider is the way to go.

PSUhoss,

Thanks, I'll give it a try.

From: Bowfreak
11-Dec-19
The tree I was hunting is a maple. Typically they don't have large butt swells but at the bottom it is almost oval shaped. I think that is what was leading to the issue. That being said....that aider is sweet. I like the aider because you can start your stand at less of an angle, making it easier to climb.

From: cnelk
11-Dec-19
To address what Ambush noticed in my pic.

1- I put some irrigation tubing around the bottom belt to keep the teeth from catching on rough tree bark and making it difficult to raise the platform - problem solved.

2- I replaced the plastic buckle straps [ that broke] with tension straps. Problem solved.

11-Dec-19
Mike, how do you keep from swinging around when you use that aider? I like the idea a LOT. I use them with climbing sticks and my saddle. However, if I don't bury the toe of my foot into the tree when I step into the aider with all my weight, it swings me around crazy like. Kinda like stepping on a steel cable that is suspended off the ground. My leg gets to jerking around all crazy with no stabilization. What's the trick to doing it when you can't bury the toe of your boot into the tree?

From: Shawn
12-Dec-19
My question is why use a climber at all. You are stuck on a telephone pole of a tree and they are noisy no matter what. A set of sticks and a hang on is just as quick and quieter as well. You also can choose the right tree and not have the tree choose you. Shawn

12-Dec-19
I use a climber a lot. That isn’t going to change. But, I’m always trying to do things better.

Outside of setting it up on the tree, my climber is very quiet as long as it’s not cocked way up in the air due to the butt swell on a tree. I’m not carrying a step to alleviate that. But, I thought mikes idea was genius.

From: jstephens61
12-Dec-19
Shawn, I don’t see how your sticks and stand are quicker than my Assault, or quieter. You’re limited by the number of sticks you carry, I’m usually limited by my 30’ pull rope.

Carried this Assault all over the country and never had an issue finding a tree with good cover to hunt from. Just lucky I guess.

Brad, I just replaced the tension straps on mine. Wish I’d seen your setup before I bought the replacement straps.

From: Fields
12-Dec-19
I know everybody has their method and likes/disliikes but, I can get up a tree with my climber pretty quick and quiet... not so much with sticks and hang on.... There are times that a nice, straight tree isn't where Id really like it, but for the most part, I can usually find a suitable tree too... Im gong to try the irrigation tubing... It seems my traction belt gets hung up on every piece of bark it hits. I gave up using the traction belt stands, and still prefer the older 'V" bars....

From: Ambush
12-Dec-19
Dumb question (should be no surprise) but what specifically is irrigation tubing?

From: cnelk
12-Dec-19
^^^ Its just sprinkler tubing - for garden or yard watering

From: Ambush
12-Dec-19
Thanks Brad, that's what I figured, but didn't want to do something even dumber than asking the question :)

Looks like my wifes sprinkler hose just got caught in the lawn mower, ...er I mean snowblower, or maybe Santa cut it with a sleigh runner.

13-Dec-19
WV Mountaineer,

When I use the aider on my climber I set the seat section fairly high to start then I reach up, grab it and pull myself up while simultaneously stepping up into the aider. The combination of grabbing the seat section and bracing myself against the front of the platform as I climb on keeps me from swinging around. I haven't actually tried the two-rung aider on my climber (I've only used it with climbing sticks) and I'm guessing that it could be a little more tricky without being able to brace your toes against the tree.

In response to Shawn's comment about why anybody would even use a climber... I'm a very mobile hunter and I also use sticks and hang on stands. With a lineman's belt attached to my fall restraint vest I'm pretty proficient at hanging sticks and stands but for me it's still not nearly as easy, quiet or quick as going up with a (Lone Wolf) climber. When using sticks and a hang on it's pretty difficult to get everything up the tree in one quiet trip, including getting dressed into warm clothes. With the sit and climb I can have all my warm clothes strapped to the back of the stand, then remove them, attach the stand, get dressed in multiple layers including Arctic Shield boot covers and then effortlessly and quietly climb the tree and get everything up the tree in one trip without working up a sweat. I've climbed a tree with a buck feeding on acorns 50 yards away and he never heard me. Also, my sit and climb is more comfortable than any hang on stand I've ever used and I like the added security of having the sit bar to brace my leg against when I stand up. I also like the option of being able to climb as high as I want without any extra gear (additional sticks) and being limited only by the length of my pull rope, which can be overcome by slinging my bow over my back while I climb.

I also like the way my climber serves as a pack frame for long hikes with the Molle shoulder straps and hip belt and my fanny pack and clothes attached to the back. As opposed to a hang on stand and four sticks plus aider that I usually haul with my Badlands 2200 backpack and then I have a much larger and more cumbersome backpack to hang in the tree compared to the fanny pack I use with my climber.

It's very rare that I hunt an area that I haven't pre scouted for available trees for various wind directions etc and I often make notes in my GPS or OnX so I know what my stand options are at a given location. If I'm going in blind, which is rare, I'll bring a hang on and sticks but if I have the option to use my climber I'll choose it every time for the reasons listed above.

In most of the areas I hunt there are a lot of straight oaks and aspens, etc so finding a climber friendly tree usually isn't a problem, however in the areas I hunt in Kansas it's rare to find a tree that I can use a climber in so I usually use a hang on and sticks there.

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