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7 yo clover plot needs help
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Puppy 03-Jan-20
BOHUNTER09 03-Jan-20
rodb 03-Jan-20
Puppy 03-Jan-20
wildan 03-Jan-20
Puppy 03-Jan-20
WI Shedhead 03-Jan-20
JSW 03-Jan-20
chasin wtails 04-Jan-20
Catscratch 04-Jan-20
From: Puppy
03-Jan-20

Puppy's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
Puppy's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

I have a 7 yo Durana clover plot that is need of help. I have nursed it along with regular mowing, spraying and frost seeding every other year but we had a late drought here in E. TN this summer and it may have put the nail in the coffin. Clover is very thin right now and a lot of young grass showing in it that I can spray but is getting harder to manage as time goes on. My question is should I frost seed it heavy again this spring or plant something else this spring/summer then after a year go back into clover? Plot is .7 - .8 acre with a fairly low deer density but there are also hogs on the property that tend to make things difficult at times. Thanks n advance!

From: BOHUNTER09
03-Jan-20
I’m in my 8th year with an imperial whitetail clover plot. I’ve also had some issues with drought a couple times but it always recovers with frost seeding. I’m anxious to hear what other’s suggest about how long you can go before starting over

From: rodb
03-Jan-20
I like clover, we have a few acres of it, it gets a lot of attention from deer but it doesn't produce enough forage so that it lasts past late October. By that time all the plots are bare ground. We're looking for something that produces a lot more forage and hopefully last well into November. Thinking about soybeans.

From: Puppy
03-Jan-20
Picture in post is from last year and looked fairly good other than a few broadleafs, this year it is no more than 1" tall if that and covered in grass.

From: wildan
03-Jan-20
I would work it up and replant in clover.Clover plantings normally only last 4-5 years. Forget soybeans unless you fence it;deer will destroy it as soon as it comes up. We have a lot of deer and had an 8 acre plot of soybeans totally destroyed in a week.

From: Puppy
03-Jan-20
Soybeans are not an option, hogs not only destroy them but will root up the area too bad. Clover is easy to go back to and might be able to just rough up ground and seed in early March or could burn it down in August and start from scratch but that a lot more work.

From: WI Shedhead
03-Jan-20
If you want to have guaranteed plants available into the winter the only sure fire way is fencing. Put a growth cage on your plots and you won’t believe how much thier eating even when you think thier underutilizing it

From: JSW
03-Jan-20
I'm a firm believer in rotation. I have an alfalfa field that is about to age out. I'm going to kill the alfalfa, disc it up and plant wheat early in September. I'm sure I'll add some turnips with the wheat. The wheat will thrive on the nitrogen left by the alfalfa and the rotation will help condition the soil for alfalfa again a year later.

The good thing about using wheat as a rotation is the timing. You can spray and kill everything that is there now and put the wheat in on clean soil. The good thing about wheat is it is a great winter food and makes it easier to control the weeds. Kill the wheat and everything else growing with it in May. You probably won't have any of the weeds going to seed by then. Then you have fewer bad seeds to deal with.

You need to remember that before roundup was invented farmers kept weeds out of their fields by rotation. Certain weeds become a problem with certain crops. As soon as the weeds start showing up again, you switch to another crop.

04-Jan-20
I have clover planted around my prairie grasses as a fire break that is on year 8 or 9. My pH is terrible and I'm tired of adding pellet lime to bump it up on a temp basis. I'm going to start over early this coming spring and get a load of ag lime, disc it in then plant clover on it again.

04-Jan-20
Another vote for rotation.

From: Catscratch
04-Jan-20
Another vote for rotation. If it were me I would consider planting an annual clover (med red?) early next spring, then spray the plot and planting wheat and perennial clovers next fall. Mow the wheat the following summer and have another long term clover plot.

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