Tight Spot Quivers
Remove HIT Insert From FMJ
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Busta'Ribs 14-Jan-20
Brotsky 14-Jan-20
Ucsdryder 14-Jan-20
ScumFrog 14-Jan-20
JTreeman 14-Jan-20
stick n string 14-Jan-20
Charlie Rehor 14-Jan-20
HDE 14-Jan-20
Bob H in NH 14-Jan-20
Buffalo1 14-Jan-20
Ucsdryder 14-Jan-20
elkstabber 14-Jan-20
SixLomaz 14-Jan-20
Buffalo1 14-Jan-20
RT 14-Jan-20
dallsheepstkr 14-Jan-20
HDE 14-Jan-20
Busta'Ribs 14-Jan-20
oldgoat 14-Jan-20
Ermine 14-Jan-20
x-man 14-Jan-20
Buffalo1 14-Jan-20
Joe Holden 14-Jan-20
Busta'Ribs 14-Jan-20
Trial153 14-Jan-20
Bou'bound 14-Jan-20
RT 14-Jan-20
butcherboy 14-Jan-20
Shug 14-Jan-20
Buffalo1 14-Jan-20
Busta'Ribs 14-Jan-20
From: Busta'Ribs
14-Jan-20
I know this has been discussed before but I can’t really find any clear answer. Can a HIT insert, applied in an FMJ (5mm 340, but not that it matters) with the Easton supplied epoxy be removed without damaging the carbon shaft? I’ve tried the drill bit-baseball bat swing method to no avail, and am considering heating some 8-32 all thread next. Anyone have an answer on this?

From: Brotsky
14-Jan-20
I have tried everything, hopefully you have better luck than I did.

From: Ucsdryder
14-Jan-20
In my experience. Nope! Not if it’s installed correctly. I’ve ruined a few arrows trying to get them out. I started using hot melt. Haven’t had any issues yet!

From: ScumFrog
14-Jan-20
Once it is epoxied, its there for life LOL

From: JTreeman
14-Jan-20
I would agree, if it was properly installed it should not come out period.

—Jim

14-Jan-20
Samesies as above for me. Thought maybe i was just an idiot.

14-Jan-20
I generally cut my arrows down, put in a new insert and give them to friends with kids and then buy new ones. Way to important for those "quartering too" shots:)

From: HDE
14-Jan-20
Place in boiling water for a few seconds and it should break the bond.

It's worked for me.

From: Bob H in NH
14-Jan-20
I got them out once, but then couldn't get the new insert in due to residual glue, tried everything and ended up tossing the arrow.

From: Buffalo1
14-Jan-20
Yes the bond of the glue can be broken and the HIT insert removed.

Get a screw about 2 1/2” long that will screw into the insert (like a field point would screw in). SLOWLY heat the screw with a torch. The heat will transmit from the screw into the insert. As the glue begins to soften, pull the screw/ insert STRAIGHT out with some pliers. Allow the shaft to return to normal room temperatures. Remove the glue from the insert by soaking inserts in acetone. The acetone will break the glue down. Wipe inserts with a cloth and then lightly sand the insert to reestablish the rough finish so glue will adhere again.

Use a q-tip with acetone to ream out and clean the inside of the shaft of the glue residue.

This is a tedious process, but once you get the hang of things it is fairly easy.

Hope this answers you question.

From: Ucsdryder
14-Jan-20
I’ve heard soaking in acetone damages the carbon. Same with heat. Not sure, just what I’ve heard

From: elkstabber
14-Jan-20
Too much heat will damage carbon. I have had some limited success by pushing the HIT insert out from the inside. Find the largest drill bit that will fit inside the shaft and insert it from the nock end of the arrow. Point the arrow up (12 oclock) and then quickly point it down (6 oclock). This makes the drill bit hit the HIT insert. Swinging it harder makes it hit harder. Careful that no one else is near you because the insert and drill bit will eventually come flying out.

Again, I've had only limited success doing this so maybe there is a better way.

From: SixLomaz
14-Jan-20
^^^^ Buffalo1

Next time just use quality (flexible but strong grip) hot melt to glue them.

From: Buffalo1
14-Jan-20
I have always used a glue recommended by my bow shop that is stronger than the Easton glue that comes with purchased shafts. It has extreme adhesiveness. I might give hot glue a try sometime.

I used hot glue for years with aluminum shafts.

Thanks for the suggestion

From: RT
14-Jan-20
I'd probably step drill it out carefully, 1000 grit the remaining glue, then flip it and fletch that end instead. If you care about the label, many times they come off easy with a towel soaked in acetone.

14-Jan-20
So why would you want to remove the insert? Are you shortening the arrow?

From: HDE
14-Jan-20
If hot water were an issue, then NAP Quikfletch would be an issuse as well...

From: Busta'Ribs
14-Jan-20
Couple reasons for the need to remove. Mostly due to quality control issues (I suck) during assembly. I have accumulated a half dozen or so shafts where the inserts are glued in a bit too shallow so my broadheads don’t screw on quite far enough and there is the slightest gap between the end if the shaft and the “bottom” of the broadhead ferrule. Additionally, I’ve had good luck recently experimenting with increasing foc by adding heavy brass HIT inserts, and would like to pull the standard HIT inserts on some shafts and replace them with the heavier brass inserts. It’s funny that I never thought of it before but HDE is correct, and I’ve been dipping carbon shafts, including FMJ’s, in boiling water for years to install NAP Quickfketch. Never had a problem. Either been lucky or boiling water isn’t hot enough to damage the shafts. Not so sure about trying to heat up an insert enough to break the epoxy free though. This is definitely a problem that needs fixin though.

From: oldgoat
14-Jan-20
Arrow saw works pretty good!

From: Ermine
14-Jan-20
I’ve gotten them out before. Take an old field point and put it into the insert. Heat the field point up like to where it’s orange hot: And you can pull the insert out. The heat should transfer to the insert.

From: x-man
14-Jan-20
The resins in the epoxy adhesive are very similar to the resins holding the carbon fibers of the arrow shaft together. There's a fine line between hot enough to soften the epoxy and not hot enough to soften the carbon resin. If you know the exact melting point of the Easton epoxy, there are temp markers(looks like a crayon) that can be put on the end of the shaft.

If you are not equipped with such markers and the correct temp range, I would not attempt the heating method.

From: Buffalo1
14-Jan-20
x-man you are so correct- there is a very fine line when dealing with carbon shafts (archery or golf) about too much heat and not enough heat. It is like performing extremely delicate surgery.

Busta'-Ribs I can feel your pain in having "screw ups of bad insertions" when building arrows using HIT inserts.

From: Joe Holden
14-Jan-20
Unsure of the O.D. of those FMJ's, but i slip an old 2016 shaft over my Black Eagle Renegades and heat the aluminum. Has worked for me so far.

From: Busta'Ribs
14-Jan-20
Well, just tried the boiling water approach, total fail, wrecked every shaft (bulged ends). Think the consensus is correct, if you install with supplied epox correctly, they’re in for good. Lesson learned. Thx boys.

From: Trial153
14-Jan-20
I never not got them out with the drill bit, that said I only did it maybe a dozen times.

From: Bou'bound
14-Jan-20
that HIT system is an over-engineered mess, but what an arrow when partnered with a 75 grain brass insert. very quiet and hits like 2000 pounds of masonary material.

From: RT
14-Jan-20
I agree with RT ^ above.

Try that next time.

From: butcherboy
14-Jan-20
I’ve never used epoxy for any insert because of how difficult they are to remove. I use hot melt glue and screw in a field point and just heat that barely enough to melt the glue. Grab some pliers and light tug pulls them right right out.

From: Shug
14-Jan-20
Not that this will help you now, but in the future use hot melt.

That’s what I use never had a problem and I’m able to remove them when I need to

From: Buffalo1
14-Jan-20
Read my instructions on how to remove inserts. It may work !

From: Busta'Ribs
14-Jan-20
RT for the win, missed your post above somehow. That sounds like the best approach. Bit tedious, but foolproof if you're careful. OK, now that I've ponied up and ordered another dozen shafts, what hot melt do you guys recommend? Or will any old brand do?

  • Sitka Gear