Moultrie Products
Fertilizer / Lime?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Shmiller 13-Feb-20
MQQSE 13-Feb-20
Screwball 13-Feb-20
Dude 13-Feb-20
Teeton 13-Feb-20
B&C 13-Feb-20
goyt 13-Feb-20
BullBuster 14-Feb-20
Pop-r 14-Feb-20
Stressless 16-Feb-20
Shmiller 17-Feb-20
Teeton 17-Feb-20
Pat Lefemine 17-Feb-20
Shmiller 20-Feb-20
Shmiller 20-Feb-20
Shmiller 20-Feb-20
Shmiller 20-Feb-20
Shmiller 20-Feb-20
Habitat 20-Feb-20
From: Shmiller
13-Feb-20
Last year we established a .5 acre clover plots, mixed with annuals and perennial. We planted in spring and fought weeds bought had great results. I will frost seed in 2 weeks and wanted to know any recommendations for Lime /Fertilizer going into year 2?

Another plot we are going into year 4 of soybeans / radishes. No rotations. Always did Ag beans, but last year planted Eagle seed. Have never has a problem with tonnage but figured most likely need to add some lime or fertilizer at some point?

I do not have any soil nor time to get them done. These plots are in Northern KY and I am PA so we are not close.

From: MQQSE
13-Feb-20
Lime will probably make a big difference. On such a small plot I would add pelletized lime ASAP as it will take time to get to work for you. You can google recommended amounts.

I also can’t imagine a bean plot without fertilizer and lime if you haven’t in four years. Again, google recommended amounts and fertilize as recommended. Lime that plot asap. Good luck. The recommended lime amounts will vary based on what current Ph is but just guess and get the lime down as it is only going to help. I did just that on some of my clover plots this last season and the results were astounding.

From: Screwball
13-Feb-20
Get a soil test asap, then you will know. We sued liquid cal with little to no change in our PH level. And yes we test annually.

From: Dude
13-Feb-20
Soil test is the best way to go, and any general suggests are just that but-----

What seed are you spreading? What the history of the plot regarding fertility amendments? This will make a difference

Some general thoughts assuming that you are only frost seeding clover or some type of legume. 1)Add lime (assuming that most soils are acidic in that area) unless some has been added recently to both plots. Any amount that you add will make fertilizer more available to the plants. A general recommendation is 2 tons of ag lime per acre yearly until desired pH is reached. (FYI:there is a lot of regional variability in neutralizing effect of ag lime.) Pelleted lime is the best way to go if you only have a short time to set up and be there. 2) If planting only clover, choose fertilizer with little to no nitrogen in it (add an inoculant if not already added to the seed). Nitrogen will be the first number of three that is on the bag. It can be spread when you frost seed. 3) For some type of grass type plant (corn, wheat, etc)or brassica fertilizer should contain a fair amount of Nitrogen as well as the phosphorous and potassium. It is best to spread this prior to a rain shower when plants are green to prevent leaching of the nitrogen.

From: Teeton
13-Feb-20
If you can find out a little history of the soil in your area if you can't do a soil test. You can then at a guess put down lime at a good guesstimate rate.

But if your plot is being utilizing by game as is, I would do nothing but a soil sample this year, cut as needed and then plan for next year.

Yes putting lime and fertilizer down should help this year, but why do it twice. There is other factors to food plots. Such where the plot is located, what kind of other food is in the area that make a plot. If it's a mountain plot with with little to no other quality food in the area. Even a plot that's only fair will be a good plot. I know of a plot that's right now 75% weeds/grass and about 25% clover, it's a mountain plot and the best food of it's kind for miles. There deer in it ever day because it's the best food around.

From: B&C
13-Feb-20
Chances are you need to raise the ph. You can put down 800 lbs/acre of pellet lime.

From: goyt
13-Feb-20
Having the pH too high is actually worse than being too low. In most cases the pH is well below 7 so lime is helpful. If the soil pH gets much above 7 nothing will grow well in caustic soil. It is hard to bring the pH down if it gets high. If you have never had a soil test it is probably in your best interest to wait to lime until you get a test. I do not see a big problem with doing whatever planting you want to do before applying lime if you can not get a soil sample before you want to plant. Take a sample when you are there to plant and then fertilize and lime after you "know" what to apply.

From: BullBuster
14-Feb-20
You can check with your local farm extension program and ask them what pH the typical land has in your area to get some idea.

From: Pop-r
14-Feb-20
Nobody can tell you what you need without a soil test. It'd be like guessing what color pants you have on.

From: Stressless
16-Feb-20
What Pop-r said...

From: Shmiller
17-Feb-20
Thanks everyone. We did do soil tests 3 years ago and our plots were between 6.5-7.5. However, we have been planting 3 years straight without any treatments. Plots grow like wild fire, but we don't rotate crops either. This is why I asked. I was looking for advice on what minerals get depleted by these crops. Based on the responses I may just do some lime on each plot and get soil test and plan for next year.

From: Teeton
17-Feb-20
Shmiller, when was the last time you put lime down?? From what you said 6.5 to 7.5,, you don't want to put lime down till you know what it's at. Your number could of went up or down.. But the last thing you want is for your numbers to get higher than they are right now. If it was me I would do a test and plan on next year. You said they are growing well. They just may not need a thing. Much better to be under than over.. Ed

From: Pat Lefemine
17-Feb-20
Was it 6.5-7.5 before you limed or after you limed? If after, what was it before?

I test mine every year but if your plots are growing great then I wouldn’t overthink it too much.

And I’m amazed that you can grow soybeans on .5 acres in Kentucky and actually get them established! You fencing them in?

From: Shmiller
20-Feb-20

Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

Thanks Teeton and Pat. I think since things are growing good, I will just keep them going this year and I will do the soil test this summer after plots are established.

Pat - Yes we fence the beans in. Instead of using the double row technique we put orange flagger tape on the top of the fence posts. It stretches and flaps in the wind causing the same effect as double fencing. Basically made this idea up because we couldn't afford a second fence. I can't prove it was a perfect method, but seemed to work for us.

We used Eagle soybean and Ag soybean mixed. They grew so thick the deer actually wouldn't jump the fence to get in them. Eventually we removed the orange tape and literally cleared a path going in. Once we did that the deer came in like wildfire. Since the Eagle seed regrows and we kept the deer out till plot was established. They were never able to eat it all. Still have deer picking up scraps now. The yield from the Eagle seed was insane.

Here are some pics of the 2 clover plots (each is about .5 acre) and the soybean plot (about 1.2 acre). These plots are in Greenup County, basically in the mountains. I was told by landowner they call it "hilltop farming". Was originally used for cattle and just full of rye grass and weeds.

From: Shmiller
20-Feb-20

Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

From: Shmiller
20-Feb-20

Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

From: Shmiller
20-Feb-20

Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

From: Shmiller
20-Feb-20

Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo
Shmiller's DeerBuilder embedded Photo

From: Habitat
20-Feb-20
If my test were bad enough I had to put down 800 lbs of pel lime I would put regular ag lime down and be done with it for alittle longer

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