Summit Treestands
Sleeping Bag Help
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Shug 19-Feb-20
Jaquomo 19-Feb-20
Pop-r 19-Feb-20
JohnMC 19-Feb-20
Shug 19-Feb-20
Tdvorak 19-Feb-20
Brotsky 19-Feb-20
Habitat 19-Feb-20
Nick Muche 19-Feb-20
sticksender 19-Feb-20
fisherick 19-Feb-20
trakman 19-Feb-20
Shug 19-Feb-20
Ridgefire 19-Feb-20
jdee 19-Feb-20
WV Mountaineer 19-Feb-20
Trial153 19-Feb-20
Paul@thefort 19-Feb-20
Ambush 19-Feb-20
Jaquomo 19-Feb-20
Whocares 19-Feb-20
midwest 20-Feb-20
DanaC 20-Feb-20
Smtn10PT 20-Feb-20
dgb 20-Feb-20
Tonybear61 20-Feb-20
walleyes 21-Feb-20
kota-man 21-Feb-20
Padfoot 21-Feb-20
Padfoot 21-Feb-20
Padfoot 21-Feb-20
willliamtell 22-Feb-20
yeager 22-Feb-20
Padfoot 22-Feb-20
Matt 22-Feb-20
Pop-r 22-Feb-20
SBH 22-Feb-20
plenty coups 23-Feb-20
shakey 23-Feb-20
Corn bore 23-Feb-20
Tdvorak 23-Feb-20
Nick Muche 23-Feb-20
altitude sick 24-Feb-20
Brotsky 24-Feb-20
From: Shug
19-Feb-20
I’m in the market for a lightweight 0 to 15 degree type bag. Mummy style but a little roomier in the feet and shoulders... any thoughts ? Thanks... Was thinking KUIU but I figured there’s less expensive as good.. yes?

From: Jaquomo
19-Feb-20
Marmot Helium

From: Pop-r
19-Feb-20
Western Mountaineering has a complete line very worthy of checking out.

From: JohnMC
19-Feb-20
Do you want down or synthetic. Down will be lighter and pack down smaller, but more of a problem if gets wet and more expensive. I bought a used 12 degree down last year on craigslist for about 1/3 of price new and was happy with it. Forgot the brand of top of head. Good down sleeping bag are not cheap.

From: Shug
19-Feb-20
Synthetic I was thinking

From: Tdvorak
19-Feb-20
I and my help in AK have gone round and round about this. It completely dominated the conversation for the season two years ago. We then followed up with a scorched earth internet search for the perfect bag. I’m guessing we put in roughly 40 hours or research apiece. I don’t think I’m exaggerating. We evaluated weight, size rolled up to fit in the Super Cub, usable size, down or synthetic, warmth, lining material, exterior material and leg room. We left cost as no object. We were willing to spend anything to get the “perfect bag”. We have gone to a square bag by SlumberJack! I know...it’s one of the cheapest on the market. We chose it because we couldn’t risk using down in case we had a tent wreck during a storm. It’s the tent that had the right temp rating (we chose -10 to plus 10) square bottom, full size unrolled and “reasonable” size to fit in the Cub and weight to fit in the Cub and still available on the market. We gave up size and weight due to it not being down but figured we couldn’t risk down with or without snake oil treatment in the Alaska bush. We also agreed nylon inside and outside was best. And we also decided that using a nylon or silk liner bag kept out bag warmer on super cold nights and could easily be washed in the creek during a warm spell to keep it from grossing us out from stink after living out of our sleeping bags for 20-40 nights in the bush. Number of nights varies depending on how quickly we fill our clients tags. You may have different needs than we do but that’s what we came up with.

From: Brotsky
19-Feb-20

Brotsky's Link
Shug, based upon what you described that you want look at the synthetic bags from Nemo. Their spoon shape gives you more room in the shoulders and knee areas to facilitate side sleeping. I use one of their down bags and really like it. See my link for a synthetic bag from Nemo.

From: Habitat
19-Feb-20
Keep an eye on camo fire they have some deals on bags

From: Nick Muche
19-Feb-20
Kifaru Slick bag, wide.

From: sticksender
19-Feb-20
Shug, the best choice would depend a lot on whether you're talking about using it for backpacking trips vs horseback trips or truck camping. You said light weight, so you probably mean to backpack. I like Western Mountaineering bags, but they're among the most expensive.

From: fisherick
19-Feb-20
Marmot Helium, Picked it up cheap at REI clearance sale.

From: trakman
19-Feb-20
I got a marmot water prof down for a hunt in Alaska and it was good

From: Shug
19-Feb-20
Thanks guy

From: Ridgefire
19-Feb-20
My Marmot Helium has been great for me for the last 5 years or so. Warm and light.

From: jdee
19-Feb-20
I used a Kuiu 15 degree mummy in NM all last season. Lowest it got down to was about 10 degrees ...bottles of Gatorade were frozen rock hard in the morning . Had a small tent, I had a pad under it and slept in socks, Marino wool bottoms, Marino wool top and a Sitka Kelvin lite Jacket and I didn’t have the bag zipped closed . That was about as low as I would want it to be with the 15 degree bag !! Anything above 15- 20* was comfortable. Quality bag.

19-Feb-20
Nick X 2

From: Trial153
19-Feb-20
X3 slick bag

From: Paul@thefort
19-Feb-20
The temperature rating on the bag may not be the true comfort level. For example, I purchase a Big Agnus 17 degrees (this was printed on the outside of the bag), down tec (water resistant down) bag, thinking I would sleep comfortably at 17 degrees and above. Not so I found out. The 17 degrees temp limit, according to Big Agnes was the temperature where you would be starting to get very uncomfortable. I ended up spend $90 for an add on liner that gave the bag a true 10 degrees more comfort and I can also take it out for warmer temps and also wash it when needed. I asked Big Agnes why not print 27 Degree Bag instead of 17 degrees. I did not get a good answer.

The tag on the bag showed these numbers: So the real comfort was 28 degree and up not 17 degrees as was printed on the bag.

T Comfort =28 degrees T limit=17 degrees T Extreme= - 17 degrees

From: Ambush
19-Feb-20
I also have a Marmot Helium, but the older one with the waterproof shell. One thing to consider when planning how warm a bag to buy, is the other insulation you have with you already. A puffy and pants worn in your bag will add several degrees to its rating and you're carrying them around anyway. Any time you can make something serve double duty you save weight, money and energy.

From: Jaquomo
19-Feb-20
Idylwild had a saying, that the low end temp rating is the temperature at which you will still be alive in the morning...

From: Whocares
19-Feb-20
Marmot Helium 15 degree. Super light and packs small.

From: midwest
20-Feb-20
I don't own one, but if I were to purchase a synthetic bag, it would be a Kifaru slick bag. Made in America and designed by real, hardcore back country hunters.

From: DanaC
20-Feb-20
Wet weather or dry? Wet, forget down. Wet down will not loft and keep you warm. Synthetics will.

From: Smtn10PT
20-Feb-20
I was looking for the same thing years ago, at the advice of Nick and others I went with the slick bag, I have yet to be disappointed in my choice.

From: dgb
20-Feb-20
I recently picked up a bag from Outdoor Vitals which seems pretty good - and well priced.

From: Tonybear61
20-Feb-20
Recent REI sale, 2 # down bag rated 15-20 degrees for about $140

From: walleyes
21-Feb-20
Check out Taiga bags made in Canada. For Down they are hard to beat. I used one for a month in the NWT this year and was impressed.

From: kota-man
21-Feb-20
For synthetic, I like the Slick Bag. For down, it’s hard to beat Western Mountaineering. The Stone Glacier bags have piqued my interest as well.

From: Padfoot
21-Feb-20
Check out Hyde and Byke. Their zero degree long bag is out of stock but their prices are good. $190ish for a Reg 0 degree down bag. Weight about 3.3#.

From: Padfoot
21-Feb-20
Check out Hyde and Byke. Their zero degree long bag is out of stock but their prices are good. $190ish for a Reg 0 degree down bag. Weight about 3.3#.

From: Padfoot
21-Feb-20
Check out Hyde and Byke. Their zero degree long bag is out of stock but their prices are good. $190ish for a Reg 0 degree down bag. Weight about 3.3#.

From: willliamtell
22-Feb-20
You need to know how you'll be using the bag. wet weather, backpack hunts? How important is weight? What's your budget? As noted, Western Mountaineering is a top brand. Feathered Friends is topnotch also. The zippers will last, and they won't catch o the fabric, leak down, have seams unravel, etc. Plus they last a long time with proper care. Unless you sleep very warm, figure on adding 10-15 degrees to the rated warmth to get the minimum temperature for a comfortable nights sleep. The lightest weight bags are going to be tight fitting.

From: yeager
22-Feb-20
A friend of mine has a Wiggys -60 Antarctic mummy style bag and swears by it. Anybody here have any experience with it?

From: Padfoot
22-Feb-20
Check out Hyde and Byke. Their zero degree long bag is out of stock but their prices are good. $190ish for a Reg 0 degree down bag. Weight about 3.3#.

From: Matt
22-Feb-20
"Idylwild had a saying, that the low end temp rating is the temperature at which you will still be alive in the morning..."

Very true for cheap bags, but for higher quality bags it is more of a comfort rating.

From: Pop-r
22-Feb-20
Ftr...most companies such as Western Mountaineering rate their bags temp wise with a "pair of long underwear and a head garment" or something very similarly worded. That adds 10°+ in my mind right there.

From: SBH
22-Feb-20
There are a few different ways they rate the temps in the sleeping bag world. Pretty good write up on Stone Glacier site explaining the differences. https://www.stoneglacier.com/pages/sleeping-bags

From: plenty coups
23-Feb-20
Western Mountaineering. Great Products.

From: shakey
23-Feb-20
Stone Glacier

From: Corn bore
23-Feb-20

Corn bore's embedded Photo
Corn bore's embedded Photo
Read up on EN rating. Bags are rated at their lower limit but also have comfort rating. My marmot helium keeps me comfortable to a little below freezing but would probably keep me alive down to it’s 15 degree rating if I wore all the clothing I brought with me. For temps from zero to fifteen degrees you will probably need at least a zero degree rated bag. Most brands will be EN rated but western mountaineering is one brand that doesn’t use the EN rating system. Lots of info on the web about this stuff.

From: Tdvorak
23-Feb-20
You have dozens of great choices unless you don’t want a mummy style because you like to move your legs. If you don’t mind your legs being tethered a bit, you can pick any of many. The square bottom is hard to come by when you combine it with other criteria.

From: Nick Muche
23-Feb-20
Willie, using a 6lb bag when flying with strict weight limits eliminates a few pounds of potatoes and onions that I’ll add to my fresh tenderloins.

24-Feb-20
Backcountry website Has Nemo bags 25% off They have a roomy design if that is a higher than light weight

From: Brotsky
24-Feb-20
Damn you guys and spending my money. I now want a slick bag.

  • Sitka Gear