Black Gold Sights
Lowestpull weight05' 70#parkerbuckhunter
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Bou'bound 23-Feb-20
Paul@thefort 23-Feb-20
Paul@thefort 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
x-man 23-Feb-20
Paul@thefort 23-Feb-20
Russ Koon 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 23-Feb-20
GLP 23-Feb-20
Kaotic_Kevin24 24-Feb-20
Too many bows Bob 25-Feb-20
23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Bow info
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Bow info
I just got a used 2005 Parker Buckhunter off letgo and I'm new to using compound bows so I have a couple questions.. First off the bow's sticker says 70# at 29".. the previous owner said he had the bow set at around 60# but with my messed up left rotator cuff I can't shoot at 60# for very long without having shoulder pain. So does anyone know how many turns on the limb bolts from its peak weight can I go a down without the bolts coming out? Or the lowest pull weight it can safely adjust to ? Also if anyone knows how long the actual limb bolt is that would help too,I don't have a bow press so I don't wanna take any chances on loosening the bolts to far and getting my face string slapped! Lol thanks guys

23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Parker Buckhunter Info
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Parker Buckhunter Info
Here is my bows info, and yea I know I misspelled Buckhunter in photo description lol

From: Bou'bound
23-Feb-20
They call it 60 on the low end for a reason. You could be a half inch or a half turn from disaster. Get it to a pro shop. You don’t even KNOW it is not already lower than 60. You just know somebody said that.

From: Paul@thefort
23-Feb-20
Boubound x2. ie, Pro Shop. Also, Google Search, 'Parker Buck Hunter Compound bow' for more info/review for that bow.

From: Paul@thefort
23-Feb-20
This info is from the Parker Manual 6. COMPOUND BOW ADJUSTMENTS DRAW WEIGHT All Parker bows are set on peak weight at the factory. Draw weight can be adjusted downward below peak draw weight using a 3/16” Allen wrench. Turn each limb bolt clockwise to increase the weight and counter clockwise to decrease the bow weight. It is very important to adjust the limb bolts on both limbs equally. NOTE: Some bow models have a peak weight range of 10 pounds, 15 pounds, and 20 pounds. Be sure to check your bow model for its appropriate draw weight range, and DO NOT exceed its LOWER limit.

I expect--One turn of the bolts usually increases/decrease the poundage by 2.5- 3 pounds. Your bow is 60-70 pound range. And it might be already set at 60#, lower limits, per the previous owner.

23-Feb-20
Thanks guys, but I already know what the manual says online. I just wanted to know the exact specs on the draw weight for this bow, I was hoping someone with a Buckhunter would give me some answers. But if 60# is the lowest I can go than I guess I'm stuck at 60#,or I'll just get a crossbow lol

23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Considering I paid $25 for the bow I can't really complain about the poundage adjustability lol

From: x-man
23-Feb-20
I know almost everything there is to know about that bow model. I was a Parker pro for many years. You don't have to worry about the limb bolts coming out. They are very long. However, you should never have them backed out far enough that the end of the limb is beyond the limb pocket. By your first picture, you have about one more turn is all.

May I suggest getting a new string that is one inch shorter (55"). This will pre-load the limb and remove the "first inch" of the draw cycle. Effectively lowering the peak weight by about 6-8#. This will also shorten the draw length but, not an issue. Draw modules are easily adjusted.

From: Paul@thefort
23-Feb-20
Rob, good info. Paul

From: Russ Koon
23-Feb-20
Not familiar with that particular model, but I have cranked several compounds down well beyond their minimum suggested draw weights without any problems.

All of the ones I have reduced the draw weight on have been originally set with the limbs cranked all the way down to maximum draw weight at the factory, and the limbs were bottomed out in the limb pockets and could not be increased in draw weight over the original setting, except one PSE from back in the very early days of cam bows. Looking at the pic above of the limbs position in the pocket, it sure appears to be well off the maximum already. Do both limbs appear to have that much room under the limb for tightening?

I improvised a draw weight scale by tossing rope over a tree limb and hanging a five-gallon bucket from the string and filling it with gravel until it pulled through the breakover, then weighing the bucket of gravel on the bathroom scales. Five gallons of water only weighs forty pounds so you need something heavier if using that handy size bucket . It's slow and a bit of work just to find out, but when you don't have access to a bow scale it's an accurate substitute method.

Of all the bows I've cranked down, only found one that couldn't be cranked all the way down to the point where I could actually disassemble it completely without using a press. I suspect the "Kids, don't try this at home!!" manufacturers warning are primarily for the benefit of the local pro shops who prefer to have you come in for their $ervice.

The ones I have taken apart like that have not been dramatic at all, just got looser until they came apart. It IS a very good idea to take pictures as you go if you disassemble one, as some things that look like they'd be completely simple to put back together aren't as simple as they looked when you're doing it.

When you think about it, unless there was some good reason for shorter ones, the limb bolts that are long enough to start without the limbs being in a press would be by far the easiest way to assemble the bow when it was made, so most are likely to be long enough to disassemble to the point of relaxing all tension without exploding into a bunch of flying parts.

But, this is free info from a non-professional amateur bow mechanic and one who admittedly has not worked on your make and model, so use your own judgment.

Oh, if you do take it all the way down to disassemble it, be sure to take a couple of pics of the way the string goes around the cams and anchors to them. It can be surprisingly easy to do that wrong and even have it look right until it's all back together and it draws very wrong.

It's not like taking your laptop or your cell phone apart. There's no magic stuff in there and the worst you can do is manage somehow to screw up a $25 bow, but it will likely survive and so will you, and you'll feel more confident about the next adjustment that needs to be made to it.

23-Feb-20
Thanks for the advice, I watched lots of videos on YouTube about compound bows and the mechanics of how they work so I think I know the important things. Like I said before I have a bad left shoulder and I wanted to be able to target shoot the bow but I can only shoot about 10 arrows before my shoulder gives up on me. I'm just gonna look into getting another lower pull weight bow or a crossbow for my backyard target shooting and use the Buckhunter for hunting. I won't mess with the poundage on it since I now know it only goes down to 60#, thanks guys for the info... Really helped!

23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Top limb
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Top limb
Oh, and to answer your question Russ about the limb pockets I measured the actual gap and the tiller. I'll post the pics.

23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Bottom Limb Bolt
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Bottom Limb Bolt

23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Top Tiller measurement
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Top Tiller measurement

23-Feb-20

Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Bottom Tiller measurement
Kaotic_Kevin24's embedded Photo
Bottom Tiller measurement

From: GLP
23-Feb-20
Do your self a favor and reread x-man. He knows his stuff on bows.

24-Feb-20
I read every post in detail and I took the advice you guys gave . I appreciate all the help guys, it saved me from alot of headache??

25-Feb-20
You've got too much bow. If you dink around with it and you have it come apart when you are at full draw, you will have a very rude surprise.

For $25, move it on to someone who can handle it. Take it from a guy who has had 2 shoulder surgeries, there are plenty of bad consequences to having too much bow besides it coming apart trying to get it to a weight you can shoot it. A 50# bow will kill most anything you are likely to go after, and you'll be able to do it comfortably and enjoy shooting the bow.

TMBB

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