Moultrie Products
Cat Fight In Florida
cougar
Contributors to this thread:
JL 22-Apr-20
IdyllwildArcher 22-Apr-20
SteveB 22-Apr-20
Inshart 22-Apr-20
JJr 22-Apr-20
White Falcon 22-Apr-20
t-roy 22-Apr-20
drycreek 22-Apr-20
lewis 23-Apr-20
WV Mountaineer 23-Apr-20
HH 24-Apr-20
Shuteye 24-Apr-20
Olink 24-Apr-20
Shug 24-Apr-20
bigswivle 24-Apr-20
South Farm 24-Apr-20
JL 24-Apr-20
bigswivle 24-Apr-20
JL 24-Apr-20
Ermine 24-Apr-20
bigswivle 25-Apr-20
From: JL
22-Apr-20
Got this in the inbox today. Very cool vid. The hog wanting to get into the scrap was impressive. He must have some serious grapefruits.

22-Apr-20
Wow! It's rare enough to see a lion, much less a fight. And then a hog thinks he's going to get in on the action.

It looks like the one was biting at the other's balls - I'm assuming that was two males fighting over territory. I've read that most male cats will kill each other and that mature males routinely kill juvenile males.

I wonder if using 2 cat's fighting sound would be a legitimate way to call in mature boars?

From: SteveB
22-Apr-20
Holy macaroni!!

From: Inshart
22-Apr-20
WOW, that's just unreal!

From: JJr
22-Apr-20
Really cool!!

From: White Falcon
22-Apr-20
Guess the hog changes his mind!

From: t-roy
22-Apr-20
I think bigswivle posted that video on a thread here a little while back. Incredible footage!

From: drycreek
22-Apr-20
I like how that lion looked back at Troy’s hen yelps as if to say “I’d come over there and ring yer neck, but I’m tired now”. :-)

From: lewis
23-Apr-20
That was taken not far from our old lease by a friend of a very good friend of mine. I started to post this earlier but wanted to make sure it was ok to do so.Those male cats are very territorial. I know of 3 or 4 I called in turkey hunting along with a bunch of bobcats and.1 bear on a dead run.National Geographic is running this video.Good luck and stay safe Lewis

23-Apr-20
Pretty dang cool

From: HH
24-Apr-20
Big male was trying to castrate the young male. They do that or try sometimes.

Very rare chance to see a fight like this.

That was a big boar that came in!

HH~

From: Shuteye
24-Apr-20
Great video.

From: Olink
24-Apr-20
Not the cat fight that I was hoping for.

From: Shug
24-Apr-20
That’s about as cool as it gets

From: bigswivle
24-Apr-20
Would’ve been way cooler with two gunshots

From: South Farm
24-Apr-20
Wow, you sure don't see that everyday! But how come every time there's a really good cat fight some fat pig always has to break it up?!?

From: JL
24-Apr-20
Bigs....if you get caught shooting a Florida panther you're in very deep do-do. Same for a Keys deer.

From: bigswivle
24-Apr-20
Bigs....if you get caught shooting a Florida panther you're in very deep do-do. Same for a Keys deer.

There’s no such thing as a Florida panther bud, those are cats from out west. I know the people who do the blood tests on the cats in Florida. Zero % Florida Panthers. Good thing about Florida rednecks is we practice SSS very well.

From: JL
24-Apr-20

JL's Link
Sure there is.......it's a subspecies....just like the Texas cougar is a related subspecies. They have been in Florida for a very long time. For all we know, the Texas cougar could have evolved from the Florida panther as the migrated to the west then separated off. Your buds may have been testing the offspring of the Texas cougars that were reintroduced down south. Read on....

"Breeding the Florida panthers and Texas cougars would not be considered hybridization, since the two are subspecies of the same species, Felis concolor, which includes panthers, cougars, pumas and mountain lions. Florida panthers and Texas cougars ranged freely throughout the Southeast and bred with each other until the two populations were separated by development more than a hundred years ago. As a result, the new breeding effort would not call into question the legal standing of the Florida panther on the list of endangered species.

While the Florida panther once ranged throughout the Southeast, it is now confined to one relatively small area of south Florida wilderness. Because the panthers have large ranges and interact infrequently, it would be unlikely that the south Florida population would be adversely affected by a single factor, a natural disaster or disease, for example. If the panther is to flourish, however, most biologists believe that there should be several populations scattered throughout the Southeast. If one becomes too inbred, its gene pool could be invigorated by the introduction of panthers from another population."

More info on the Florida panther from the FWC.....

“The Florida panther (Puma concolor) is one of the rarest large mammals in the United States. Historically, the panther was distributed from eastern Texas or western Louisiana and the lower Mississippi River Valley, east through the southeastern United States including all of Florida (Young and Goldman 1946). Although occasional sightings and signs were reported throughout the rural southeast between 1950 and 1980, the only confirmed panther population was found in south Florida (Anderson 1983). Geographic isolation of the Florida panther, combined with habitat loss, population decline and associated inbreeding, resulted in significant loss of genetic variability and decline in the overall health of the population. To restore genetic variability, eight female Texas panthers were released in strategic locations within south Florida in 1995. Due to the genetic augmentation, the population grew from less than 50 panthers in 1995 to the current population of 80-100. All offspring of the Texas panthers are considered to be Florida panthers. The panther is listed as endangered under both the Endangered Species Act and Florida law. Increased development into panther habitat has heightened the potential for human-panther interactions, thereby raising public safety awareness issues. Due to the panther’s potential for extinction, conflicts with humans raise issues that require careful consideration and action such that the intent and ability to conserve the species is unaltered while at the same time the safety of the public remains paramount.”

From: Ermine
24-Apr-20
That’s a neat video. “Florida Panthers” is a population of the North American Cougar, not a sub species. All cougars in North America are now recognized as the same animal, just divided into populations occurring in separate habitats.

From: bigswivle
25-Apr-20
Lol, google and Michigan’s know all

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