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What is best sleeping bag for elk hunt
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Wonderlust 22-May-20
RK 22-May-20
Jaquomo 22-May-20
Ambush 22-May-20
Wonderlust 22-May-20
JTreeman 22-May-20
JohnMC 22-May-20
Jaquomo 22-May-20
Scrappy 22-May-20
Panther Bone 22-May-20
JohnMC 22-May-20
Buffalo1 22-May-20
JSW 22-May-20
elkmtngear 22-May-20
WapitiBob 23-May-20
Glunt@work 23-May-20
Ambush 23-May-20
txhunter58 23-May-20
Glunt@work 23-May-20
Bou'bound 23-May-20
Ermine 23-May-20
KSflatlander 23-May-20
Bou'bound 23-May-20
TD 24-May-20
Zim 24-May-20
Glunt@work 24-May-20
deerslayer 24-May-20
DanaC 24-May-20
WV Mountaineer 24-May-20
Empty Freezer 24-May-20
ohiohunter 24-May-20
Bou'bound 26-May-20
From: Wonderlust
22-May-20
What is best sleeping bag for elk hunting

From: RK
22-May-20

From: Jaquomo
22-May-20
Too many variables to answer that question. I have five. Depending upon the situation, one of my five will usually work.

From: Ambush
22-May-20
“There’s a sleeping bag in your tent.”

“Shhh, you might wake her up and she won’t let me go elk hunting!”

From: Wonderlust
22-May-20
Not sure if I should get a 3 season or 4 season. We will be in a canvas tent with a little stove. Camping at 7000 ft at the end of September

From: JTreeman
22-May-20
I don’t believe I have ever heard sleeping bags qualified as “3-season or 4-season”. They are generally listed as comfort ratings in degrees. Sounds like you still have a bit of research to do before narrowing it down, but some things to consider. Min temp expected, down vs synthetic, pack able size, pack weight, backpacking in, horses, truck camp, type of pad, cot or no, cost? These factors (and possibly others) will all effect your decision.

—Jim

From: JohnMC
22-May-20
In all honest if in a wall tent with stove, at truck and September when can get cold but not really cold. Just about any bag in 10-20 degree range will work. If you all keep stove hot that might be to warm but you can alway unzip it. Weight not a big consideration. I’d get a synthetic bag that is roomy.

From: Jaquomo
22-May-20

From: Scrappy
22-May-20
Wall tent at the vehicle I would have sheets and comforter. Some will say corny but I say comfy. No way I would be buying something to sleep in at the trailhead.

22-May-20
I'd be toting a down quilt. Enlightened Equipment is a solid brand, but you may have to order it and wait over a month. REI makes a down Magma 30 degree quilt that was on sale not long ago.

From: JohnMC
22-May-20
Why recommend a several hundred dollar down quilt to truck camp in a heated tent. Sometimes I feel like the only one on bowsite that does not try to find the most expensive item that would work for everything.

From: Buffalo1
22-May-20
One that does not retain water. Nothing worse than a wet sleeping bag or bed.

From: JSW
22-May-20
I'm too much of a tightwad to have 5 different bags to hunt with. I use only 2. I have a Northface rated at around 15 degrees that weighs under 3# that I use while backbacking. I've had it for over 20 years and it works just fine. I have an older quallofil bag rated for 0 degrees that I use around camp. It is much too heavy to packpack with and while it's too heavy for warmer weather, I just sleep under it unzipped. I might also have a light blanket around camp and use a combination of both. If I were not so tight, I would buy a Kuiu down bag, probably the 15 degree version for backpacking.

Around the truck or in a wall tent, it doesn't really make a lot of difference. You could get by with a Walmart bag as long as it wasn't too light.

From: elkmtngear
22-May-20
I have a 15 degree bag, and a 0 degree bag.

I can honestly say, it's gone from being too hot in the 15, to too cold in the zero bag, in a matter of 2 days. The Rockies are like a box of chocolates...you never know what you're gonna get.

From: WapitiBob
23-May-20
wall tent, wood stove, september; go buy a 20 deg cloth bag at sportsmans

From: Glunt@work
23-May-20
If in a wall tent and near the truck, a big canvas, comfy, cloth lined,rectangle bag on top of a 2-3" foam pad, on a cot. A real pillow as well. The fire dies out before wake up time and it can get darn chilly. If you or a horse/llama has to pack it in, a down zero degree would be my choice and an insulated pad. Easy to open up if its too warm, not as easy to make a 20deg bag warmer if needed. I say down because in a canvas tent you will likely stay dry and they pack small. If you will be using it for other trips where you might be at risk of getting wet, a synthetic fill has advantages.

From: Ambush
23-May-20
For a lot of my truck camping I have two older synthetic back packable bags, one roomy rectangle and a roomy mummy style. I put the mummy inside the rectangular and usually don't fully zip the outer bag and put it over me or off depending on the temp. I think both bags were about 20F when new. For backpacking and real cold, I use a Marmot Helium down bag.

From: txhunter58
23-May-20
I have 3. Never needed a warmer than a 0 degree bag. And many times when I end up taking that one I get too hot. My go to bag is a 20 degree bag. If I could only have one, that would be it. As stated, you can unzip if it is a little warm. But for warmer weather camping I have a dual degree bag. Flip it one way and it’s a 30 degree. Flip it the other way and it is a 50 degree.

So start with one, but through the years get another one or two. Figure out what you want and watch for sales.

From: Glunt@work
23-May-20
I rarely store my bags correctly. They are often in a stuff sack. It reduces their loft so I buy lower temp rated bags knowing they wont keep that rating.

From: Bou'bound
23-May-20
Depends on the weather and if weight is a factor or not. Most elk bags will work for other species too

From: Ermine
23-May-20
Western mountaineering

From: KSflatlander
23-May-20
Northface One Bag. Three sleeping bags in one. And it’s extremely lightweight and comfortable.

From: Bou'bound
23-May-20
Depends on the weather and if weight is a factor or not. Most elk bags will work for other species too

From: TD
24-May-20
Cot or pad?

=D

Watch out for "comfort" ratings. The vast majority..... especially many of those, um.. thrifty brands recommended here, are survivability ratings and have nothing to do with comfort. In a wall tent with stove a few army surplus wool blankets will be enough. Gets chilly stoke up the stove. most of em will drive you out of a tent if you wanted to.

You looking for one that you could use for nearly any kind of hunt in NA I'd start with Western Mountaineering. There are many others, but the good ones aren't cheap. I've spent a night or two out in cheap bags where I'd have paid about any price at about 2-3am to be warm and comfy. A firm believer of get quality equipment and don't look back. I think Ermine refers to it as buy once and cry once. =D

Been my experience most cots sleep a bit colder than a good pad.

From: Zim
24-May-20
Kifaru Slick bag, zero degree. Versatile and reliable. As others have stated, A canvas tent with a stove covers a lot of sins. But as you grow in experience that bag will serve you well.

From: Glunt@work
24-May-20
Cots can be colder. When truck camping, I drape a wool blanket over my cot after putting the pad on. It traps the air underneath and is a lot warmer.

From: deerslayer
24-May-20
Lots of good advice listed above.

I have Personally have 2, both Big Agnes. The first is a 15 degree synthetic that I use during mid day naps with my hammock. The 2nd is a -20 degree bag I leave on my cot at the tent. Two major differing factors for me are #1 I use a horse to hunt, although I pack him in with saddle panniers while I walk, so I’m still limited on weight/bulk, but not nearly as much as if I had to carry it all on my back. Second factor is most of my elk hunting is done in October. Because of that I am very thankful for my -20 bag as the weather can get real nasty Around that time. If you are hunting mid September with limited space I would look at a synthetic 15 degree bag. If you’re going to hunt late September-early October I would drop the degree to a 0. If weight isn’t an issue I would go with down over synthetic. Just my thoughts.

From: DanaC
24-May-20
Think of 'camp' bags vs 'backpacking' bags. Or, 'is weight a consideration'? If yes, then look for less weight, more efficient insulation and more of it. That's a 'mummy' bag with down or high-end synthetic insulation. Bring money. Bring lots. (That fancy sewing adds cost.)

Forget down unless you've used it plenty and know the drill - air it out daily, keep it dry. Synthetics maintain 'loft' better when damp. In a 'camp' with less weight restriction think 'more room' and comfort. Look for a good oversize rectangular bag with synthetic insulation. And forget that 'flannel lined' stuff. Really. That is 'summer with the kiddies' gear.

24-May-20
It doesn’t require something special in a canvas tent with a stove. You do however need one that will keep you warm when it gets cold in that tent. For that kind of stuff a Coleman over sized 20 degree bag is really nice.

24-May-20
Or you can cheat and take a large handwarmer and stick them to your feet. Warm feet will have you sleepin like a baby. And dont forget a good pillow. Couple good Mountain House farts and you are good to go.

From: ohiohunter
24-May-20
Aw man, I hate hot feet. I’m forever kicking my feet out from my covers.

From: Bou'bound
26-May-20
Depends on the weather and if weight is a factor or not. Most elk bags will work for other species too

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