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Utah hunter finds elk 6 years latter
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Huntcell 30-May-20
Grey Ghost 30-May-20
Ucsdryder 30-May-20
Glunt@work 30-May-20
GF 30-May-20
Bou'bound 30-May-20
Ucsdryder 30-May-20
Grey Ghost 30-May-20
nowheels 30-May-20
Snuffer 30-May-20
Jaquomo 30-May-20
Rut Nut 30-May-20
Drnaln 30-May-20
Mint 30-May-20
CFMuley 30-May-20
Grey Ghost 30-May-20
Z Barebow 30-May-20
Empty Freezer 30-May-20
Out-there 30-May-20
RK 30-May-20
fubar racin 30-May-20
Paul@thefort 31-May-20
Missouribreaks 31-May-20
Boreal 31-May-20
Spiral Horn 31-May-20
Ambush 31-May-20
Jaquomo 31-May-20
Jaquomo 31-May-20
Lee 31-May-20
Ambush 31-May-20
Grey Ghost 31-May-20
Ucsdryder 31-May-20
Ambush 31-May-20
Scientist 31-May-20
GF 31-May-20
Scientist 31-May-20
Ambush 31-May-20
GF 31-May-20
Ambush 31-May-20
Boreal 31-May-20
BULELK1 31-May-20
DL 31-May-20
Lee 31-May-20
Gamer 02-Jun-20
Gamer 11-Jun-20
deerslayer 12-Jun-20
Treeline 12-Jun-20
Ambush 13-Jun-20
Missouribreaks 13-Jun-20
Irishman 15-Jun-20
From: Huntcell
30-May-20

Huntcell 's embedded Photo
Huntcell 's embedded Photo

Huntcell 's Link
What are the odds?

Sure was in good condition after all those years.

From: Grey Ghost
30-May-20
That would be a bitter sweet reward for me. I don't think I could mount a bull that I had wounded and someone else found the remains of 6 years later.

Matt

From: Ucsdryder
30-May-20
Cool story. I think it’s cool he mounted it. It meant a lot to him.

From: Glunt@work
30-May-20
Thats not an elk they found. The elk was gone shortly after it died. They found some antlers and bones. Interesting story, pretty cool to get a souvenir and an ending to what happened. No issue with him mounting it, good conversation piece. Stories should start with "This is the elk I lost..." not "This is the elk I got...". Not on my high horse, I have lost elk. It stinks.

From: GF
30-May-20
Bittersweet for sure...

But it does sound like a pretty good day at the office for the CO; I’d imagine seeing so much bad behavior by so-called “sportsmen” would get really old, so seeing someone - several people, really - following all the rules right down to the letter... sounds pretty refreshing...

I understand your misgivings about having it mounted, Matt.... Completely. But somehow I think most of us would be able to see our way clear...

If the antlers were badly bleached, though, I think I would just let it go as a Euro.

From: Bou'bound
30-May-20
That’s so excellent. Will he enter it in pope and young?

From: Ucsdryder
30-May-20
Good question Bou. Did you enter your lion?

From: Grey Ghost
30-May-20
"I understand your misgivings about having it mounted, Matt.... Completely. But somehow I think most of us would be able to see our way clear..."

I'm sure some would.

I once found a bull 3 days after I shot him too far back. The magpies and flies had made a mess of him, and you could smell the stench from him a 1/4 of a mile away. I cut the antlers off, tied my tag to them, and packed them out, but nothing about that experience was rewarding to me. The antlers hanging on my garage wall are a constant reminder of my poor shot execution and a wasted animal.

I guess everyone has a different definition of "trophy".

Matt

From: nowheels
30-May-20
“Stories should start with "This is the elk I lost..." not "This is the elk I got..."....”.

I agree. I hope that is how it is presented. The steps and effort that the article mentions the hunter taking to find the bull make me believe that he will present it as such.

From: Snuffer
30-May-20
Bou got a lion ?

From: Jaquomo
30-May-20
I had an experience similar to GG. High lung hit, found him 24 hours later, quartered him anyway, but the meat had soured. Punched my tag too. That big rack is in my basement and every time I look at it, it reminds me of what happens sometimes. I don't display it for anyone to ser even though it's one of my biggest bulls. I vuess everyone has a different definition of "trophy".

From: Rut Nut
30-May-20
I’d say those odds are astronomical! Cool story! Glad it was recovered instead of sitting there for decades slowly turning to dust.

Maybe getting it mounted was his way of honoring the animal.

From: Drnaln
30-May-20
Nice bull

From: Mint
30-May-20
I have a different take, I'm glad he mounted the elk, he is honoring the animal not himself. I think we should honor the animal more than the hunter.

From: CFMuley
30-May-20
Sounds like the hunter handled it as best he could all the way through. I’m glad he was able to get the antlers in the end.

From: Grey Ghost
30-May-20
I'm not sure how mounting an animal that you wounded and someone else found the remains of 6 years later is "honoring" that animal. Do you mount every road-kill you come across in "honor" of the animal?

To me, honoring an animal is all about making a swift ethical kill, then thanking God for allowing that animal to bless your dinner table for months to come. Mounting the antlers of a lost and wasted animal, with another animal's cape, is the definition of horn porn egotism, to me. I couldn't look at that mount without feeling disappointment and remorse every time. And I surely wouldn't want to explain to visitors how that mount got on my wall

But, again, I don't expect everyone to share my opinions.

Matt

From: Z Barebow
30-May-20
Not exactly the same. I found a dead bull. (Skull and scattered bones) Been dead at least a year. Poor hit w/arrow. (Broken arrow was laying where guts would have been). He also had a Muzzy imbedded in an antler. I packed out skull, restored antlers and did European mount. It is in my office. But I let people know I didn’t shoot it. I did it out of respect for the animal.

30-May-20
Cool story.. You can do whatever the hell you want.. This is America

From: Out-there
30-May-20
That's crazy!

From: RK
30-May-20
I'm shocked at all the issues some of you have with this scenario

Very strange.

But I guess in this new world of PC AND touchy-feely emotions it may make some sense. Maybe?

From: fubar racin
30-May-20

fubar racin's embedded Photo
fubar racin's embedded Photo
This was a dead head.

From: Paul@thefort
31-May-20
Amazing that the antlers were still intact and not eaten by rodents that usually finish them off within a year or two. Great story and I am glad he got some closure. A Euro mount would have satisfied me but his mount will tell an interesting story, ie, "now you know the rest of the story". my best, Paul

31-May-20
Honoring an animal by killing it (and scoring) really does nothing for the animal, is more for to satisfy the hunter mind at that point.

Having said that, I am glad you located the remains.

From: Boreal
31-May-20
Cool story. Stupid replies.

From: Spiral Horn
31-May-20
Mounting the animal is certainly a deeply personal choice - more power to him for honoring a magnificent specimen. Once knew a taxidermist many years ago who had been hunting a great buck that was unfortunately found dead (roadkill, not by him). He thought it was just a beautifully symmetrical 10-pointer, took possession of the carcass, and mounted the buck.

As far as I know he never took credit for harvesting the animal but said he mounted it just because it was a truly gorgeous buck - which it was (~150 class). I see nothing wrong with that.

In Steve’s case the only thing that remains slightly unclear is whether the bull actually died from Steve’s arrow (although it’s likely the case). But regardless, it’s a great story with a very happy ending. Not that Steve’s choice of mounting the bull is any of my business, if I’d arrowed a huge bull like that and it was eventually returned to me by the authorities as mine, I’d mount it. Beautiful bull and a lovely story of initial heartbreak to unexpected redemption. Very nice.

From: Ambush
31-May-20
The bull may have died five years after he shot it? That would explain its condition.

Lots of hunters have shot animals that were packing broadheads and bullets from previous seasons.

From: Jaquomo
31-May-20

From: Jaquomo
31-May-20
Great insight, Boreal.

Seems like the story is more of the "trophy" than the bone. He can retell the story whenever someone looks at that mount, and can imagine that he killed the elk with his arrow.

Better that than what I experienced recently. A friend's nephew showed me the mount of a 410" bull he killed. His story was incredible, DIY, public land solo hunt in an area I know very well, not known for big bulls. Then he showed me the hero shot. I recognized the backdrop, and called him out. He killed it on a small high fence operation with basically tame elk, and invented the DIY, public land story.

He begged me not to tell anyone because his wife would go berzerk if she knew he had paid that kind of money to shoot that elk, with a baby at home and another on the way.

The meaning of "trophy" is different for everyone.

From: Lee
31-May-20
Doubt the antlers would be that similar if he died 5 years later. Looks identical to his trail cam pics. Kudos to the hunter as far as I’m concerned. While he didn’t reduce him to possession on his hunt he never gave up and punched his tag as well as he assumed he killed the bull. I know many hunters that would have assumed they didn’t kill him after looking for a day and kept on hunting. Sounds to me like he did everything right except find the bull. Glad he got closure. Losing an animal is always tough - regardless of size.

Lee

From: Ambush
31-May-20
Lee, he didn’t punch his tag. And where I live, that would be illegal if he did.

I never understood the “.. I punched my tag, knowing the animal was dead.“ Just quit hunting that species, because, if you never found it, you don’t know for sure it’s dead.

What if you “mortally” wounded the second biggest buck of your life but couldn’t find him, so punched your buck tag. Sitting in your treestand trying to fill a doe tag and the biggest buck you’ve ever seen strolls by. You can’t shoot. Then a week later your neighbour shows you a pic of the buck he just shot and it’s the one you “killed” and punched your tag for.

From: Grey Ghost
31-May-20
Do we really "honor" an animal by hanging his dead mounted head on our walls? If so, then why don't we honor the cows, does, and meat bulls and bucks that we kill? Don't those animals deserve the same respect?

I still say a trophy mount is to stroke the ego of the hunter, more than it is to honor the animal. Not that there's anything wrong with that. I'm as guilty as anyone. But let's call it what it is, at least.

Matt

From: Ucsdryder
31-May-20
Amazing what people can find to argue about...

From: Ambush
31-May-20
^^^^ I’m not arguing, I’m just telling everybody else where they’re wrong. lol

From: Scientist
31-May-20

Scientist 's Link
I think its look like a bull.

From: GF
31-May-20
And FWIW... I’ve never bothered to get anything mounted AT ALL, so no, I don’t suppose I’d start off by commemorating the worst kind of a failure. I’d be far more interested in mounting sheds or a dead-head from a nice bull that I had chosen to let walk.

That’s something I could look at every day with a clean conscience and only good memories.

And as for “Honoring the Animal”.... Gimme a freakin’ break.

From: Scientist
31-May-20

Scientist 's Link
I think its look like a bull.

From: Ambush
31-May-20
Maybe we can agree that only public land, diy, non-draw, one mile from ag, animals can be mounted with any pride A notarized letter swearing that you were wearing at least one non-synthetic garment (deer skin moccasins get extra credit) and did not have the animal on a trail cam.

From: GF
31-May-20
Whatever makes you happy, Rod - that’s what personal decisions are for. I just know it’d eat at me every time I looked up at it.

From: Ambush
31-May-20
Yup, just seems that personal decisions have to be approved by everyone else now.

On the bright side, we don’t need the disdain from the anti’s. We can get it right in our own circles.

From: Boreal
31-May-20
Yeah Ambush, that was the point of my post. A fellow bowhunter has a unique story to tell and it's met with criticism, self promotion and a veiled swipe at P&Y. Disturbing to say the least.

From: BULELK1
31-May-20
I was hoping this was Results for our 'pav/Paul' as he had a similar outcome from his BC-Bow Bull hunt and most everyone that could tried to help him find that bull.

Certainly Happy for this fellow bowhunter though,

Robb

From: DL
31-May-20
Whatever one wants to do with it is up to them. I lost a buck 4 years ago and the a remains were found by A friend two days latter. He text me and asked if I wanted the antlers. I said no, leave them there. I made a poor shot on a 100 degree day. If I had the antlers I would be upset at myself every time I saw them. That was the first animal I had lost. I get upset loosing a duck. But That’s me. I have my demons to deal with in hunting. I probably would have picked up the elk antlers if it was mine. Hopefully enough time would have passed that I wouldn’t still be beating myself up over it. Most likely one of my grandkids would get it.

From: Lee
31-May-20
Doubt the antlers would be that similar if he died 5 years later. Looks identical to his trail cam pics. Kudos to the hunter as far as I’m concerned. While he didn’t reduce him to possession on his hunt he never gave up and punched his tag as well as he assumed he killed the bull. I know many hunters that would have assumed they didn’t kill him after looking for a day and kept on hunting. Sounds to me like he did everything right except find the bull. Glad he got closure. Losing an animal is always tough - regardless of size.

Lee

From: Gamer
02-Jun-20

Gamer's Link
I also see something similar in Argentina

From: Gamer
11-Jun-20

Gamer's Link
Today I also see the same thing on Africa

From: deerslayer
12-Jun-20
I think it's an awesome story! Obviously it isn't the same, and no, he would not be allowed to enter it in the book anyway, as the rules require "Unabandoned chase". However, It sounds like the guy put in a premium effort in recovery and came up short, The chances of it all going down like it did, with the right person finding it, and all the evidence the guy still had was really cool.

I have a similar story from the year I graduated high school. I have always wanted to write an article about it, so I'll keep the details short, but it was a coming of age story with a magnificent buck who I found a shed from when I was a senior. He had a huge droptine, and lived on an incredibly pressured piece of state land in south east Mi. I saw him during the summer in velvet and he was unbelievable. I'm talking big even by Canadian standards. It was a one in a 10 million deer for this area. That fall, I hunted him for 5 weeks straight and never saw him. Long story short, unbeknownst to me, he got had locked together with another deer and killed the other buck. He was dragging the buck around on a local civic center soccer field and a public works dept guy, who had also been hunting the buck, saw it. He contacted the Sheriff Dept who shot the buck in the neck with a 12 ga. I had no clue about all this and the next summer I was still scouting for the buck. I had heard about 2 big bucks that had been locked together and stopped in one day to see if the Sheriff's Dept had a picture. Turns out it was the buck I was after. My heart was in my throat. When I asked what happened to the buck, the badge heavy deputy, all but told me to get lost. I was a young kid, easily intimidated, and heart broke. I thought about the buck for years afterward. 7 years later, a week before I moved out west, I decided to try and locate the buck one more time. I simply wanted to lay eyes on and hold the rack that I had dreamed about. There were an incredible amount of details I am leaving out in case I ever write it all up, but I eventually found the owner of the rack (The public works guy) who was a super cool older gentlemen. I told him the whole story and showed him the shed. He brought the rack to work later that week and let me see it. In the end, without me even trying, he offered to let me buy it. He said he could tell it meant more to me than it did to him. You could have pushed me over with a feather. It had never been mounted as the deputy had shot it in the neck. (Thankfully for me!) I bought it on the spot and had a friend mount it. There were so many amazing and neat things about the story. I have him proudly displayed in my house, as he was a magnificent buck, and yes, I feel it is a buck worthy of honoring in the sense that he grew to be so mature, outwitting hundreds of hunters over the years in an area where a 100" buck would be a trophy. I have newspaper articles and tons of pictures regarding the whole story and have never taken credit for the buck, but tell interested people the whole story. I have yet to have a true hunter not appreciate the amazing story and incredible deer.

So yeah.... you can poopoo the thought of honoring an animal, but to those of us who get it, it makes total sense. I am sure the hunter in this story would much rather have recovered the bull that day, but given the circumstances, I think this was a fantastic ending to a cool story.

From: Treeline
12-Jun-20
Cool story, Justin. Isn’t that what taxidermy is all about? Admiration for a special animal and the story that goes with it?

From: Ambush
13-Jun-20
Great story deerslayer and hopefully you do write the whole thing up soon. That is indeed honouring the animal itself!

Myself and millions of people love to wander Cabelas or Basspro just to look at the awesome animals displayed. I didn’t shoot them. Nobody in that store shot them. And many are even Just replicas of amazing animals. I don’t see the difference in having one in your home.

Some people get mounts done with sheds they’ve found, because the sheds or deadheads are incredible or they have a history with that animal. I just don’t see the ethical dilemma here.

13-Jun-20
Why is ethics mentioned here? Nothing in this entire scenario has anything to do with ethics. Who decides ethics anyway?

From: Irishman
15-Jun-20
Jaquomo, great story about your friend's nephew. What is odd to me, is that aren't the trophies all about what they mean to you? When I look at an elk rack, I think of how I got it.

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