Mathews Inc.
Nasty Nasty Nasty Basinboy
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Trophyhill 18-Jun-20
Brun 18-Jun-20
Scoot 18-Jun-20
elkmtngear 18-Jun-20
Grey Ghost 18-Jun-20
smarba 18-Jun-20
Fuzzy 18-Jun-20
nmwapiti 18-Jun-20
IdyllwildArcher 18-Jun-20
delkslayr 18-Jun-20
delkslayr 18-Jun-20
JohnMC 18-Jun-20
mrelite 18-Jun-20
Huntcell 18-Jun-20
t-roy 18-Jun-20
elkmtngear 18-Jun-20
t-roy 18-Jun-20
maxracx 18-Jun-20
Matt 18-Jun-20
ki-ke 18-Jun-20
ki-ke 18-Jun-20
Phaseolus 18-Jun-20
Treeline 18-Jun-20
Basinboy 18-Jun-20
blackbear62 18-Jun-20
Surfbow 18-Jun-20
APauls 19-Jun-20
APauls 19-Jun-20
Sandbrew 19-Jun-20
OTC_Bowhunter 19-Jun-20
DL 19-Jun-20
t-roy 19-Jun-20
WHOCARES 19-Jun-20
APauls 19-Jun-20
Beendare 19-Jun-20
MQQSE 19-Jun-20
Treeline 20-Jun-20
pa10point 20-Jun-20
Killbuck 20-Jun-20
From: Trophyhill
18-Jun-20
After seeing Basinboy's elk on Paul's broadhead thread, I feel very fortunate on field dressing my kills. However I do know many of you have had some tough situations field dressing. Let's see those pics of the field dressing nightmares where elk have met their demise in the worst location possible and how you got er done.

From: Brun
18-Jun-20
My bull last year didn't look like a bad spot, but it turned out to be about the hardest ever for me to get quartered and bagged. It was a very large bodied bull and I was alone. I went gutless and it started off well, but after getting one side finished I couldn't get him rolled over. It was flat and open so there was nothing to tie off of and when I tried to roll him over he kept sliding. I tried every angle and eventually I yanked so hard I felt something pop in my shoulder. I immediately sat down and pondered the situation. I was about 3.6 miles in and thought I'd never get it done.... After a few minutes I started to test my arm and it didn't hurt that much to move it. I was able to sit on my butt and move him a little with just my legs. Eventually I got him in a better spot and was able to tip him over with my legs, and then get the last two quarters off. I was amazed I could use my arm at all as I knew I felt something rip...... After it was all said and done I went to a doctor and it turns out I had torn my biceps tendon off the bone. The good news is it's attached in two places and he said I could continue without it if I was able. I'm still going and able to shoot my bow

From: Scoot
18-Jun-20

Scoot's embedded Photo
Scoot's embedded Photo
After a tough trip I finally got a crack at an elk- my one and only cow I've ever shot. She ended up dying in the bottom of a little stream bed that was sloppy as heck. Her back legs were sunk in the mud and it was almost impossible to move her. A little after we started working on quartering her we heard a very large rush of water coming at us. We quickly scampered up to higher ground the best we could. Something let loose in the stream above with all the rain we had been getting and the cow was almost completely under water about 15 minutes after this pic was taken. After a while it went down and we got to work. We worked really hard to get her taken care of and finally managed to get the job done. What a mess!

From: elkmtngear
18-Jun-20

elkmtngear's embedded Photo
elkmtngear's embedded Photo
"I tried every angle and eventually I yanked so hard I felt something pop in my shoulder". Damn, Brun...that made me cringe!

Tried to get a general feel for how steep this was...picture didn't do it justice. Tied off the antlers with paracord, to keep the bull from sliding downhill. My buddy and I were worn out, by the time we got him bagged, just from trying to keep from sliding.

Next Day, we came back with horses...could only get them within about 300 yards of the kill site. I had to ride each quarter down the mountain like a sled, in the snow.

Good times!

From: Grey Ghost
18-Jun-20
I can attest to the size of Brun's bull last year, since I was blessed to help him pack it out. It had a huge body, and an equally impressive rack. Honestly, I was surprised that Brun was able to quarter the bull by himself, especially considering he isn't the...um...youngest buck in the herd. ;-) It was inspiring for me to see him get it done at such a high level.

My worst ever field-dressing and pack out experience was a bull that I killed in the deepest, steepest, and thickest drainage I'm aware of in unit 18 in Colorado. He died on a 45 degree slope covered in beetle-killed blow down, inconveniently wedged under a large log. The only way out was approximately 3 miles up and over the top of the drainage. Fortunately, I had a young strong buddy to help me. Even though it wasn't a large bull, It took everything we both had to quarter and pack him out. I swore to never kill a bull in that he!! hole again.

Matt

From: smarba
18-Jun-20

smarba's embedded Photo
Video frame immediately after the shot
smarba's embedded Photo
Video frame immediately after the shot
smarba's embedded Photo
Timmmmberrrrrr!!!
smarba's embedded Photo
Timmmmberrrrrr!!!
smarba's embedded Photo
Splash down!!!!
smarba's embedded Photo
Splash down!!!!
smarba's embedded Photo
Before the work...
smarba's embedded Photo
Before the work...
I killed this bull in a wallow. Honestly never even occurred to me that he'd simply tip over without taking a step. After the shot he stood still for maybe 30 seconds, then just tipped over like a falling tree. Huge splash in the mud, and he had already been rolling and was wet and muddy.

Huge bodied bull, nearly 100 pounds of meat more than mature bulls I've killed before. I was hunting with a buddy and with paracord around the bull and our waists like pack mules we could BARELY slide him out of the water, but still on slick mud.

We removed the meat from the upper side via gutless method, all the while slipping and sinking in slop. At that point it was all we could do to drag what remained up off the mud onto grass around the wallow. Still wet and messy at that point, but at least flat ground and we weren't sinking in mud.

From: Fuzzy
18-Jun-20
I sympathize with everyone on these posts, I'm also impressed with the effort and ingenuity employed in solving the difficulties, one of my favorite threads in years!

From: nmwapiti
18-Jun-20

nmwapiti's embedded Photo
nmwapiti's embedded Photo
Too many to remember. This is a fun one...

18-Jun-20
Some rough stories early on in this thread.

My mountain goat died in moderate sized scree on a steep angle. The size that you don't sink into, they just fall and hit your ankles and cut you...baseball size. I was alone.

I didn't even get into skinning him before the whole mountain side tried to take the both of us on a ride. Fortunately, I had a boulder on one side I was able to step on to as it went, but the goat and my stuff ended up a couple hundred feet down the slope.

You don't realize how much time you spend kneeling while deboning an animal till you're doing it on sharp rocks.

From: delkslayr
18-Jun-20

delkslayr's embedded Photo
delkslayr's embedded Photo
Steep hill and rolled against the log, had to do top side and then roll over after that!

From: delkslayr
18-Jun-20

delkslayr's embedded Photo
delkslayr's embedded Photo
This one died at the highest tree on the mountain at over 12,000. While quartering, he started to roll and we were able to get him stopped. Had he kept going, it would have been a 3k foot roll to the bottom!

From: JohnMC
18-Jun-20
Scoot I had a buddy I was with kill a bull that died in creek that look a lot like your picture. Less mud but creek had a few inch deep of running water. Fun quartering job.

From: mrelite
18-Jun-20

mrelite's embedded Photo
mrelite's embedded Photo
I shot him in the evening and did not find him until the next day, temps were warm and by the time I had butchered him he was already bone sour. Everything about this situation was the worse I had ever encountered.

From: Huntcell
18-Jun-20
Pictures rarely reveal the steepness of the terrain.

Most often “had to be there”

From: t-roy
18-Jun-20

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
Not an elk, but this was the roughest spot I’ve had to get a critter out of. At least the ground was level ;-)

From: elkmtngear
18-Jun-20
Cool pic Troy...a nightmare...but, a very cool pic!

From: t-roy
18-Jun-20

From: maxracx
18-Jun-20
Very cool pic Troy!!!! Hope you and the wife are well.....All good here.

From: Matt
18-Jun-20
Spined a staghorn in a tank, had to get him out by myself. That was not fun.

From: ki-ke
18-Jun-20
One of my most favorite moose pics T-Roy! Should have recruited the beavers to help!!

From: ki-ke
18-Jun-20
Smarba, why doncha post the actual vid of you killing tht bull on the wallow??

From: Phaseolus
18-Jun-20

Phaseolus's embedded Photo
Phaseolus's embedded Photo
Wedged

From: Treeline
18-Jun-20
Troy’s photo should be titled “Heaven and Hell”!

Spectacular!

Have packed out more elk than I would wish on my worst enemy. None “easy” but some easier than others...

The worst is when they drop into a muddy creek or beaver pond and you have to suck it up and break them down on the spot. Alone.

Have had several elk recoveries that extended over 4 days.

A number that required a lot of elevation to get out of the hole where they died and a lot of miles to the truck.

One in grizzly country. Several miles and several thousand feet down in a hole. Through the night. In a snowstorm. With no gps (lost), no compass and a dying headlamp... Thanks Ron for saving my life there...

Have been very close to death more than once packing elk. Have killed a couple of horses and one mule on pack outs.

Elk hunting is awesome!

Recovering elk meat sucks!

Gotta love it;-)

From: Basinboy
18-Jun-20

Basinboy's embedded Photo
Basinboy's embedded Photo
Phaseolus That had to be a nightmare!

I was lucky to have some big strong guys hunting with me and we were able to get my bull out from under that blow down to a much better spot.

From: blackbear62
18-Jun-20

blackbear62's Link
I've never killed an elk. However, this video of a hunter gutting his on a steep slope has always made me laugh. Enjoy. Mark

From: Surfbow
18-Jun-20

Surfbow's embedded Photo
Surfbow's embedded Photo
Pictures never accurately represent slope, but you could play music on that 550 cord it was stretched so tight. When we were done field dressing and took the head off, the carcass cartwheeled about 100 yds to the bottom of the hill...

From: APauls
19-Jun-20
lol I was waiting for t-roy's moose pic! That was the first thing I thought of.

From: APauls
19-Jun-20

APauls's embedded Photo
APauls's embedded Photo
This was essentially mud gumbo underneath where when you try and lift a quarter you just find yourself waist deep both legs in gumbo.

But who are we kidding - still loved every second!

From: Sandbrew
19-Jun-20

Sandbrew's embedded Photo
Sandbrew's embedded Photo
Sandbrew's embedded Photo
Sandbrew's embedded Photo
Late season rifle cow. Solo, 2+ miles from the truck. Last night of the season in a snow storm 2 hours before dark. No chainsaw in my pack... ;-) She had slid at least 25 yards downhill and had a pretty good head of steam before wedged herself under a pile of logs. It took a a while to get all the downed logs off her and start the work. Sandbrew

19-Jun-20

OTC_Bowhunter's embedded Photo
A rock and a hard place!
OTC_Bowhunter's embedded Photo
A rock and a hard place!

From: DL
19-Jun-20
Worst one on here I read was when their elk died right on top of an under ground meat bee nest. He said it was a war.

From: t-roy
19-Jun-20
You and your brother’s moose trip certainly came to mind, as well, APauls! .....agreed. Loved every second of it!

Poor planning on your part, sandbrew! A chainsaw goes into my pack, first thing! Looks like a shoehorn might have came in handy as well!

From: WHOCARES
19-Jun-20
Take extra gas and oil too, Troy?

From: APauls
19-Jun-20
This was essentially mud gumbo underneath where when you try and lift a quarter you just find yourself waist deep both legs in gumbo.

But who are we kidding - still loved every second!

From: Beendare
19-Jun-20
Those steep hillsides suck. My longest was 8 miles one way....but my toughest was solo in one of those steep holes. To complicate things, he was covered in hundreds of Yellowjackets by the time I finished.

I'm allergic to bee stings and it was the rare occasion I didn't have my Benadryl or an Epi pen. I was only stung 3 times on my left hand but my left arm looked like Popeye pretty quick. [apologies to the young guys that won't get that reference]

Luckily it was raining hard to cool it down. First load was at the truck in an Hour and a half or so....some Benedryl and an hour to eat/ relax....and spent the rest of the day hauling meat.

From: MQQSE
19-Jun-20

MQQSE's embedded Photo
MQQSE's embedded Photo
This photo is after I waded out and towed him to the shore. When he expired he was totally submerged except for a little fur on his side. I remember pulling that rack out of the water to see what he looked like reminding me of opening a Christmas present back in 1975.

From: Treeline
20-Jun-20
Hell of a nice bull there!

From: pa10point
20-Jun-20
MQQSE that had to be the best christmas ever.

From: Killbuck
20-Jun-20
E Don Thomas wrote, Nothing ruins a good elk hunt like killing an elk!

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