HuntStand Hunting App
Real World Soybeans
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
kyrob 20-Jun-20
WI Shedhead 20-Jun-20
RIT 20-Jun-20
Pat Lefemine 20-Jun-20
Ranger rick 20-Jun-20
Ranger rick 20-Jun-20
Junior 20-Jun-20
t-roy 20-Jun-20
Pat Lefemine 20-Jun-20
Pat Lefemine 20-Jun-20
RIT 21-Jun-20
kyrob 21-Jun-20
Kydeer1 21-Jun-20
t-roy 21-Jun-20
RIT 21-Jun-20
Mark Watkins 14-Jul-20
t-roy 14-Jul-20
Pat Lefemine 14-Jul-20
t-roy 14-Jul-20
Missouribreaks 14-Jul-20
drycreek 14-Jul-20
JL 14-Jul-20
Pat Lefemine 14-Jul-20
t-roy 14-Jul-20
JL 14-Jul-20
pav 15-Jul-20
pav 15-Jul-20
Junior 15-Jul-20
Ligh1990 15-Jul-20
BOHUNTER09 16-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 16-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 16-Jul-20
Junior 17-Jul-20
Hancock West 17-Jul-20
t-roy 17-Jul-20
Mad Trapper 17-Jul-20
Hancock West 17-Jul-20
Junior 17-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 18-Jul-20
BOHUNTER09 20-Jul-20
t-roy 20-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 20-Jul-20
Pat Lefemine 20-Jul-20
Junior 21-Jul-20
Junior 21-Jul-20
Jerry Gille 21-Jul-20
t-roy 21-Jul-20
Pat Lefemine 21-Jul-20
t-roy 21-Jul-20
Junior 21-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 21-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 21-Jul-20
Jerry 21-Jul-20
Pat Lefemine 21-Jul-20
Mark Watkins 22-Jul-20
Glats109 22-Jul-20
Glats109 22-Jul-20
From: kyrob
20-Jun-20
I put these out about 6 weeks ago and checked them today and am disappointed to say the least. Did everything right I think but they are not growing. Some are about 3 inches tall with a couple leaves but there are a lot of seeds just laying on the ground that have not germinated at all. My planter messed up and I broadcast one field to get them out before a rain. The planted field is no better as far as growth though. PH averaged 6.8 and I added the inoculant as directed. Am I expecting to much growth after 6 weeks or should there be more. This was my first time trying soybeans. Also, I have quite a few weeds and plan on spraying gly this week. Good idea or not?

Thanks for any info.

From: WI Shedhead
20-Jun-20
Call or email don Higgins he will make it right with you and give you advice on planting his product

From: RIT
20-Jun-20
You did everything right and your planter messed up? There are a bunch of seeds laying on the ground? Soybeans don’t broadcast perfect without something covering them. How did you do everything right? I bet the directions don’t say have the seed laying on the ground. With never having read a RWS bag I’m going to say they might say something about 1” deep. Are they protected? If not and in small quantities they didn’t stand much of a chance anyway. Deer browse was or is an issue on top of the planting woes.

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Jun-20

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Deere 7000 row planter
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Deere 7000 row planter
I know people have broadcast beans before successfully but there’s going to be a lot of seeds going too deep or too shallow. Find someone who has one of these.

20-Jun-20

Ranger rick 's embedded Photo
Ranger rick 's embedded Photo
I broad cast beans every year on various plots. It works just fine. Disc,drag, spread seed, lightly drag to cover seed. I broad cast heavier then recommend to account for some seed to deep or shallow. I do it all with a 4 wheeler. Pictures are of "tank" eating , in the bean plot before I harvested him!

20-Jun-20

Ranger rick 's embedded Photo
Ranger rick 's embedded Photo

From: Junior
20-Jun-20
Beans need to be covered atleast a 1/4" imo. It's not to late to reseed! Actually if your hunting this field the later the better!! Our kill plots are all first week of july planted.

From: t-roy
20-Jun-20
Probably not the case, but is there a possibility that the seed was old? I’ve had germination issues planting year old and older soybean seed. Like others stated, definitely need to get some soil coverage for optimum sprouting conditions. You could also put out an exclusion cage to see if it’s an issue with the deer over browsing your beans.

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Jun-20
I know people have broadcast beans before successfully but there’s going to be a lot of seeds going too deep or too shallow. Find someone who has one of these.

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Jun-20

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo

21-Jun-20

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Last year's broadcast results. Sprayed only once.
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Last year's broadcast results. Sprayed only once.
Ranger Rick has the same procedure I use with great success. Seed a little heavy but the cost is way less than a planter or drill.

21-Jun-20

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Pod production was exceptional. Troy is probably on to it being seed quality or another factor since pH is good and moisture hopefully as well?

GL!

From: RIT
21-Jun-20
There is a giant difference between broadcasting and then dragging and discing. The OP already stated there were a ton of seeds laying on the soil.

21-Jun-20
RIT,

The plot above had lots of seed on top. Heavy rains took care of that, but just dragging puts enough at the right depth to get the results above. Some will even be too deep. A little experience with one's soil type and you will have good results.

But if a person does quite a bit of acreage annually, then yes a drill or planter is the ticket. Most plotters don't really need one IMHO.

From: kyrob
21-Jun-20
I tilled the ground and then broadcast the seed. I dragged it to cover seed and then went over it with my cultipacker to get seed to contact soil that was not covered by drag. We have had several good rains since planting but could always use more. Supposed to get rain for next few days here so maybe that will help. I had turnips and other brassicas in this spot last year and they did great. Is there something leftover from them that the soybeans don't geehaw with?

Also, I said, a lot of seeds just laying on the ground that have not germinated, not a ton of seeds. Anyway, thanks for the input guys, I appreciate it.

From: Kydeer1
21-Jun-20
I planted eagle seed last year on two small plots. I disked the plots then broadcast roughly 80 lbs an acre right before a rain. Literally just used a piece of wire fencing pulled behind an atv to drag over the plot. It started coming up real sporadic and thin in areas. I can't recall how many weeks but I do think it is somewhere around 6 weeks I was concerned. I even put an electric fence around it to keep pressure off. I'll tell ya though in the next month or so that plot was 3 feet high and thick. It was my first time using that technique and those beans so I thought I'd share my experience. I also soil tested and applied recommended enhancements before planting. I have learned that soybeans don't require a lot of depth in dirt to come up the bigger enemies are birds and critters unless you get a timely rain or the other critters getting em when they are just coming up. Also, beans are beans....they might come up thicker and so forth but when the deer start nipping the leaves they get wiped out fast. They don't recover like I thought they were designed to do. Hope that helps.

From: t-roy
21-Jun-20
Sounds like you should have had better results than what you are seeing, kyrob, especially using a cultipacker as well. There is something to your thought about some residual from the brassicas from the previous fall. I do see some weed suppression benefits from that, but I’ve never seen it affect my soybeans planted into the previous year’s brassicas plots. I’m still thinking there’s a good possibility that it’s old seed. Do you still have some of that seed left? If so, you could do a germination test to see if that was the issue. Another possibility (which I highly doubt because of the brassicas planting in this plot) did you possibly spray any type of herbicide product that has significant carryover residual?

Also, as Junior stated, you still enough time to replant them and get good results.

From: RIT
21-Jun-20
That wasn’t my point at all. In the initial post we didn’t have all the info we needed to assume anything but we all did anyway. I simply added that there is a big difference between broadcasting on bare dirt and walking away versus dragging and or discing after broadcasting. I never said broadcasting in general won’t work and anyone who has read anything I have posted will know it’s the only way I plant. I only plant 2 acres and swear I’d never buy a drill. But I can tell you that I may buy one anyway. I can only imagine how diverse you could get with one. Waste of money for me? Absolutely..... but me planting with that thing would be an absolute racket.

I would be drilling into clover, spent WR, terminated buckwheat. My soil would never be exposed again and always have something growing into it. I think of drilling into 20” WR and what an advantage that would be over turning soil just from the moisture perspective alone.

From: Mark Watkins
14-Jul-20
Real World Beans (northern variety) are the best beans I've planted since 2008. Best being defined as: -can literally (in most places) outgrow the deer browse -grow more pods per plant (20-50%) than most Ag beans -hold the beans in the pod during cold MN Decembers..IE shatterproof.

Don Higgins and his crew have an incredible bean product right here!!!

Mark

From: t-roy
14-Jul-20
Mark.......How do your RW beans look, as far as with the water hemp? I know you sprayed a pre emerge. Did that keep it a bay long enough for your beans to get a big jump on the WH?

From: Pat Lefemine
14-Jul-20

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Ohio soybeans
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Ohio soybeans
Here’s my 14 acres of beans growing at my new Ohio farm as of Saturday. This consists of Hancock buck beans, eagle big fellow, eagle mgr mix, and Asgrow Ag beans.

From: t-roy
14-Jul-20

t-roy's embedded Photo
July 3rd
t-roy's embedded Photo
July 3rd
t-roy's embedded Photo
Different farm
t-roy's embedded Photo
Different farm
Pat......I’m assuming you are planting each variety separately?

I’ve had very good luck with controlling my water hemp issues by planting Liberty Link beans as well as using a pre emerge the past couple of years. I’d definitely plant some more Real World beans if they would come out with a LL variety.

14-Jul-20
Some very nice plots.

From: drycreek
14-Jul-20
I have had zero trouble broadcasting beans and getting a good crop. I spend enough time prepping to make sure of it. I make my last pass with the disc with the gangs almost sraight, that leaves a bunch of 1/2” to 1” grooves in the ground which is perfect for beans or peas.

From: JL
14-Jul-20
Will the deer know the difference in bean types?

From: Pat Lefemine
14-Jul-20
Troy, yes i kept each bin consistent with the same variety so I could track growth and utilization. Real world opted out of our test this year so I’m not growing RW beans. I’m still a fan. So far all beans are growing consistently and well.

From: t-roy
14-Jul-20
JL.....I’ve definitely seen deer show preference from one variety to the next, unfortunately, I couldn’t tell you which varieties were preferred and which ones weren’t. (I’m a terrible record keeper)

From: JL
14-Jul-20
I wonder if some are sweeter than others....at least to the deer??

From: pav
15-Jul-20
Old farmer once told me a soybean will germinate on concrete if it gets water. We used to disc, broadcast and drag successfully. Got a deal on a seed drill a few years ago. Cuts down on time and makes pretty rows. Dropped some seed on a gravel driveway out of that drill back in early June. The seed germinated....reminded me of that old farmer. :^)

From: pav
15-Jul-20
We switched it up a bit and went with a RealWorld variety called Pod Heaven. Don't really need the beans for summer forage. The intent of the field is more of a winter food source. Figured more pods is better....so we would gave them a try. Very disappointed in overall germination. Not sure what happened? Suspect year old seed, but weather may have been a factor. We got rain the day after planting, but then had a two week hot/dry spell. Planning to give the same variety one more chance in 2021.

From: Junior
15-Jul-20
We have harvest beans several times just for seed. We have stored them at all different moisture levels. Had them cleaned and stored in bulk bags, funnel wagons, hopper tanks. I don't know what we did wrong but they would very seldom compete with new seed. Always so inconsistent that we give up on it, and just buy new every year. IMO....Seed moisture at harvest and where/how they are stored for sure plays a part into the germination/stand/yield. I would be hesitant to even try 2 year old seed, unless I had time to experiment.

From: Ligh1990
15-Jul-20
It is real time photos shoot which are done by smart photographer.

From: BOHUNTER09
16-Jul-20
I’ve been able to use soybean seed for 3 years. I keep it cool in the basement. I always do a germination test in March to be sure th seed is ok

From: Mark Watkins
16-Jul-20
t-roy, I had the Co op come in and spray pre emergent (Matador S) the day after the RW Northern beans were planted. The pre emergent "bought me" an additional 2 1/2-3 weeks before the first Gly spraying. The Gly that they sprayed had Flexstar in it which did a great job of killing the broadleafs (pigweed, water hemp and ragweed). CAUTION: Flexstar does have a residual to it.....so if you want to overseed brassicas into your beans to add tonnage, don't spray it with Flexstar.

The good news is that the RW Northern beans (fast growing) and the pre emerge I only needed the one Gly spraying......and the Co op did ALL my spraying!

I did test overseeding winter rye into the beans and got about a 25--50% germination rate (because of the residual in Flexstar).

About September 5-10 (west central MN), right before a rain, I''ll load the tractor spreader and overseed about 125 lbs/acre of winter rye into 15 acres of standing beans

Its a good thing winter rye is cheap!

Mark

From: Mark Watkins
16-Jul-20
I did speak with Don Higgins at RW about them having a Liberty bean and he said it is "at least a few years out".

Don suggested that I do the spraying protocol I described above (less the Flexstar) and it worked excellent!

Did I mention, I love beans!!!

Mark

Mark

From: Junior
17-Jul-20
bowhunter09 No problem with germination/ forage, the grain yield is what suffers.

From: Hancock West
17-Jul-20
We've always done chicory & clover with some success but ultimately the weeds take over. We planted soybeans 3 weeks ago & sprayed them last sunday. Picked up four bags of 1year old seed for a case of Coors LIght.. Always good to have a buddy thats a farmer...

From: t-roy
17-Jul-20
You guys have had better luck with old soybean seed, than I have. Old seed corn hasn’t ever been a problem, but I’ve had germination issues with old beans a couple of times, so I just buy my soybeans every year now. I offset those costs by getting the freebie seed corn test plot seed.

From: Mad Trapper
17-Jul-20
Mark how are you over spreading into you beans? I couldn't get the seed to the ground without destroying a lot of plants.

From: Hancock West
17-Jul-20
T-Roy i agree you have to be careful with old seed. Since the seed was cheap we errored on the side of caution and doubled the recommended seed count.

From: Junior
17-Jul-20
We've broadcast a few acres with the little had held spreader until we bought a good tractor mount. Doesn't take to long really if your only doing a couple acres.

We don't worry about running over food plot beans, becaue by fall there about done anyways. Seeds made...Plus the spreader will seed a good 25'. So not tearing much up.

From: Mark Watkins
18-Jul-20
Mad Trapper, An over the shoulder earth way spreader. Just look at it as a workout!!!

I have a front mounted ATV spreader that I will use on 30” rows but this year I planted on 15”....thus using a hand spreader to overseed.

30” rows are ideal for overseeding into as the canopy later than narrower rows.

A good rule if thumb I’ve found is to almost double your seeding rate because you simply are not going to get as high a germination rate as if you planted a straight stand of brassicas.

Then when your plants are 3-4” tall I use my three point mounted spreader and put on nitrogen (46-0-0) at about 200lbs per acre right before a rain.

Mark

From: BOHUNTER09
20-Jul-20
MW I’ve not seen any benefits to applying nitrogen to soybeans. I think they actually fix nitrogen in the nodules

From: t-roy
20-Jul-20
B09.....I believe Mark is adding the N to benefit the interseeded rye and/or brassicas in his soybean plots.

From: Mark Watkins
20-Jul-20
T-roy is correct.

If the overseeding of brassicas is done correctly (timing wise before canopy) and you get reasonable rain, you can basically double the tonnage of desirable deer food per acre.

Mark

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Jul-20
I'm going to try overseeding my bean plot this year, but I'm going to focus on my 2 acre kill plot and not my big field. I can easily hand-seed my kill plot but my 14 acre plot would take me a week!

From: Junior
21-Jul-20
You guys should try some chicken manure in your kill plot! Yea, I know sounds crazy! All you need is a 5 gallon bucket full. Dig a small hole or just dump on top the ground, and think of it as a mineral block. Those deer crave the stuff hear on the easternshore!

21-Jul-20
Pat,

I have 14 acres of beans this year. I will overseed rye grain when they start to yellow using my 3 point fertilizer spreader. We get good results this way. It gives a great winter food source, builds the soil and helps with erosion and soil loss.

From: Junior
21-Jul-20
Do you guys ever harvest some of your beans? No way, would I let 14 acres of beans stand for the deer if there is a way to get the combine to them! Especially with a cover crop. I'd leave a couple acres for the deer and sell the rest. Heck, if you got 40 bpa x 10 acres, that's 400 bushel. 400 x 8.00= 3200.

21-Jul-20
They will be harvested

From: Jerry Gille
21-Jul-20
I have 13 acres of beans on one of the places I own. It is cash rented. Does overseeding standing beans create any issues for the tenant farmer in any way?

From: t-roy
21-Jul-20
Jerry......I would suppose it would depend on what was seeded and possibly when, as well as what will be planted there the following year. If seeding rye, around early September, the soybeans should be pretty much done growing, so the growing rye wouldn’t affect the yield on the beans much, if any. Planting brassicas in early August might. The rye will start growing again, come spring. There’s a good chance that the farmer will be planting corn in that plot. Growing rye is somewhat detrimental to growing corn until it is terminated (which most likely will happen when he works the ground up and/or sprays before planting, unless he no-tills) You could plant oats instead of rye. Oats are not very winter hardy, and they usually freeze out by late winter, unless you’re in more southern Illinois.

I’d suggest just tell him what you’re wanting to do, and get his input. Rye and radishes are actually being used a lot as cover crops for ag purposes to help build/amend and help hold the soil. If he’s opposed to it, maybe tell him you’d take a few $ off the cash rent.

21-Jul-20
Troy is correct.

From: Pat Lefemine
21-Jul-20

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
I’m leaving all 18 acres of my beans standing. I bought this property for deer hunting only.

From: t-roy
21-Jul-20
Junior......I cash rent out some of my farmland, but on my food plot acres, I do them myself and I leave everything unharvested through the winter for the deer/turkeys. I have roughly 6 acres in beans (in 4 different plots) this year. Another 3 acres in corn, and a few more will get planted to winter peas, brassicas and rye (IF it ever friggen rains here again!)

I would be scared to put a pencil to how much I spend on food plots, but there’s not many things that I do, are more enjoyable to me.

21-Jul-20
Only thing more enjoyable is posting on BS, right Troy;-)

My farmer has old equipment and a lot of waste grain remains. Last year I had pods on the ground into late January, deer and turkey were both coming to them. I started doing plots in this manner more often to save myself some work. More than one way to...grow plots. G.L.

From: Junior
21-Jul-20
I hear ya on the rain! We got 2 tents the month of June. Cost us another herbicide application, the beans took forever to canopy.

From: Mark Watkins
21-Jul-20
Pat, That’s a damn nice bean field (looks like 30” rows even) that makes me want to get a 14 acre “overseed workout!”

Mark

From: Mark Watkins
21-Jul-20
Junior, 18 acres of beans will be left for the critters. There won’t be one bean left by March 1.

12 acres of corn will be left for the critters. There might be a 30 bpa average the end of April. I’ll let my farmer neighbor come in and harvest them then.

12 acres of alfalfa (two cuttings) clover (three clippings) and straight brassica stands will be left for the critters.

Trying my best to keep them healthy and spread out through the winter to reduce wolf depredation.

Mark

From: Jerry
21-Jul-20
Thanks for the response t-roy.

From: Pat Lefemine
21-Jul-20
Mark, have you ever done the math on how many beans will be eaten by deer ?

140k plants/acre x 18 acres x 40 pods per plant x 3 beans per pod. It’s incredible when you put it into that perspective.

From: Mark Watkins
22-Jul-20
Pat,

It is amazing. But as my agronomist buddy puts it, “I’ve never seen so many main stems eaten off (which reduces pod yield) in my life!”

I electric fenced 1.4 acres this year in a key area. Have another 3.5 acres that will get fenced next year. Over seeded with brassicas, WR and WO by September 5-10. We call it the 1.4 acre salad bowl!!! Amazing at keeping that main stem intact!

Can’t wait to remove the fence in early October and sit on it!!!

Thanks T-Roy (the E Fence Whisperer)!!!

Mark

From: Glats109
22-Jul-20
I know food plot failure sucks but the only way to learn how to do this stuff is for it to happen to you. Everyone can recommend to you what works on their property but only you can figure out what works on yours. Yes if you take a JD 7000 your beans will have a greater chance of germination than if you broadcast. With that being said broadcasting works too. However with broadcasting you need to know your soil. Your soil needs to hold moisture well for broadcasting to work. I successfully broadcast and cultipack (no disking or harrowing) acres of beans every year. I do this bc i find when i disk in i disk the seeds to deep.

Everyone get so excited to plant but they forget how important timing the rain is.

Another important factor is deer browse.Your beans could be getting annihilated.

All in all, theres nothing wrong with the seed.

From: Glats109
22-Jul-20
I know food plot failure sucks but the only way to learn how to do this stuff is for it to happen to you. Everyone can recommend to you what works on their property but only you can figure out what works on yours. Yes if you take a JD 7000 your beans will have a greater chance of germination than if you broadcast. With that being said broadcasting works too. However with broadcasting you need to know your soil. Your soil needs to hold moisture well for broadcasting to work. I successfully broadcast and cultipack (no disking or harrowing) acres of beans every year. I do this bc i find when i disk in i disk the seeds to deep.

Everyone get so excited to plant but they forget how important timing the rain is.

Another important factor is deer browse.Your beans could be getting annihilated.

All in all, theres nothing wrong with the seed.

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