HuntStand Hunting App
Would this work?
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Medicinemann 12-Aug-20
buckfevered 12-Aug-20
Trophyhill 12-Aug-20
Norseman 12-Aug-20
Buffalo1 12-Aug-20
Bob H in NH 12-Aug-20
Mild Bill 12-Aug-20
Medicinemann 13-Aug-20
air leak 13-Aug-20
chesapeakeborn 13-Aug-20
Scoot 13-Aug-20
Grey Ghost 13-Aug-20
Inshart 13-Aug-20
jingalls 13-Aug-20
LINK 13-Aug-20
Jaybee 13-Aug-20
Rocky D 13-Aug-20
Rocky D 13-Aug-20
Rocky D 13-Aug-20
skookumjt 13-Aug-20
air leak 13-Aug-20
Bake 13-Aug-20
From: Medicinemann
12-Aug-20
Anyone that has bowhunted for a reasonable length of time has probably had a situation where you have had a shot opportunity at the animal that you want....only to have a horizontal limb covering the vitals. Some wait for the animal to clear the obstruction....others will shoot....knowing that the arrow will "arc" over the limb, and land in the vitals. Just as an experiment, I am thinking about trying to quantify the amount of "arc" that my bow might have at various distances. So....I was thinking about using my 40 yard pin at 20 yards, and my 60 yard pin at 30 yards. Assuming that the peak of my arc will be at the mid point, if my 20 yard shots are 6" high with my 40 yard pin, is it a valid assumption to assume that is the arc of my arrow when using a 40 yard pin?

From: buckfevered
12-Aug-20
I would think, if you wanted to measure the arc, you could stand 40 y from your target. Aim at a spot with your 40 y pin, holding steady, see where your 20 y pin is aiming. Measure between the 40 y dot and the 20 y spot. That would be your half distance arc. Repeat for any distance.

From: Trophyhill
12-Aug-20
great thread and something i practice daily. the further you are, the more arc obviously. i practice with the obstructions at different distances too. obstructions being pinon and juniper limbs and twigs.

From: Norseman
12-Aug-20
I would think a ballistics calculator could plot this all out for you if you enter your data in.

But I have always done what Buckfever states above.

From: Buffalo1
12-Aug-20
How would all of the calculating be done with a single pin sight where the reference point is variable, rather than stationary?

From: Bob H in NH
12-Aug-20
Randy Ulmer did a tip on this in the past. If animal is at 40 yards and branch at 20, aim at animal and then check where your 20 yard pin is. If it is on or near that branch dont shoot. If its above it, go ahead and shoot

From: Mild Bill
12-Aug-20
Bob nailed it.

From: Medicinemann
13-Aug-20
I like it!! Thanks guys....

From: air leak
13-Aug-20
I'm in the minority here, and not trying to stir the pot..But, why not wait for a better shot?

13-Aug-20
whats a pin ?

From: Scoot
13-Aug-20
One question-- I think the idea that 1/2 the shot distance is the peak of the shot is incorrect, isn't it? If I remember correctly, about 15 yards is the peak of a 20 yard shot for me. Am I remembering correctly? As I recall, if I hold my 20 yard pin on a 20 yard target, I will miss low out to about 9 yards. At 9 yards I'm spot on with my 20 yard pin. The arrow arcs up above that, peaks at about 15, then drops down to 20. So, my peak arc is about 3/4 of the way to the target. Or... I'm full of crap. Which is it? Or... are they both true- I'm right in this instance AND I'm full of crap.

From: Grey Ghost
13-Aug-20
What Bob said ^^^^

Matt

From: Inshart
13-Aug-20
Ding, Ding, Ding, Bob wins.

From: jingalls
13-Aug-20
Bob has it right. Forget all the fancy calculations. Range the object that is the obstruction and if that corresponding pin is on or below it, don’t shoot.

From: LINK
13-Aug-20
“What’s a pin?” Something compound users use to help them put chit in their trophy room. A trophy room is equivalent to a traditional archers bow room. Both places are used to store the things they like to look at, one wood and the other mounts. ;)

From: Jaybee
13-Aug-20
I do not think the the peak of the arc will be at half the distance. As your arrow slows down at greater distance it is affected more by gravity. It is not a linear equation .

From: Rocky D
13-Aug-20
Maximum ordinate is the highest point of the trajectory, which is usually 2/3 the distance to the target.

From: Rocky D
13-Aug-20
Maximum ordinate is the highest point of the trajectory, which is usually 2/3 the distance to the target.

From: Rocky D
13-Aug-20
P.S. X2 Bob H.

From: skookumjt
13-Aug-20
Air leak- because if you have practiced and know the outcome you don't have to wait. All of us have had situations where the better shot never came.

From: air leak
13-Aug-20
And how do you know the outcome?? No thanks, I'll wait.

From: Bake
13-Aug-20
This is something to practice too. I once took a shot at a pig over a dirt berm. Knowing that my arrow would arc over the berm. It messed with my head. I ended up shooting the pig in the skin above the spine. I just couldn't mentally aim AT the berm.

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