Moultrie Products
Arrow weight too light?
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Stayfit 20-Aug-20
itshot 20-Aug-20
Snuffer 20-Aug-20
Shawn 20-Aug-20
3dvapor 20-Aug-20
WapitiBob 20-Aug-20
Dale06 20-Aug-20
swede 20-Aug-20
swede 20-Aug-20
Trophyhill 20-Aug-20
WV Mountaineer 20-Aug-20
fisherick 20-Aug-20
SBH 20-Aug-20
cnelk 20-Aug-20
bowhunter24 20-Aug-20
ohiohunter 20-Aug-20
Stayfit 20-Aug-20
Out-there 21-Aug-20
Shawn 21-Aug-20
SBH 21-Aug-20
Bou'bound 21-Aug-20
carcus 21-Aug-20
bowbender77 21-Aug-20
ohiohunter 21-Aug-20
Outdoorsdude 21-Aug-20
ohiohunter 21-Aug-20
320 bull 21-Aug-20
From: Stayfit
20-Aug-20
Have a chance to chase elk after a 5 year layoff. Now in my 70's my draw weight is only 52 pounds due to shoulder issues. My arrow weight is only 375 g. I am trying to decide whether to add 38 grams of insert weight and have to paper tune again or stick with 375. Your opinions please.

From: itshot
20-Aug-20
razor sharp broadheads

From: Snuffer
20-Aug-20
You have enough weight.

From: Shawn
20-Aug-20
Perfect arrow flight, being accurate and scary sharp broadhead and you will be more than fine!! Kill a good one! Shawn

From: 3dvapor
20-Aug-20
nope go mid to upper 400s you wont get enough penetration if the shot isnt perfect. heavier is way better for low poundage

From: WapitiBob
20-Aug-20
375 seems light for a standard carbon arrow setup, I’m guessing your draw length is in the 28” range? I’m shooting 52# and 420 but have a 30” draw which helps.

From: Dale06
20-Aug-20
I’d use a cut on contact broadhead, like Magnus Stingers, or Iron Will, and I’d get my arrow weight over about 440 gr. And make sure the BH is shaving sharp.

From: swede
20-Aug-20

From: swede
20-Aug-20
I have killed quite a few elk with a 360 grain arrow. I have even had complete pass throughs. Put your arrow in the boiler room with a sharp broadhead and you should be fine. If there is a limit to your set up, I think it is in how far you should be shooting. I remember one pass through on a elk hit with a light arrow at 40 yards. That has been my max with whatever bow/arrow I am shooting. And BTW, you don't need a diaphragm call to be effective at getting elk either.

From: Trophyhill
20-Aug-20
shoot whatever you are accurate and confident with. the rest will take care of itself.

20-Aug-20
Trophyhill x 2. At this point just Go get ‘em

From: fisherick
20-Aug-20
By adding 38 grains insert will give you a high FOC, weight forward arrow for better penetration if you hit bone. Works out to be 8 grains per pound bow weight.

From: SBH
20-Aug-20
Swede X2! I think you’re fine. Get em close and hit em right. Have a great hunt!

From: cnelk
20-Aug-20
I killed several elk back in the day with old, slow bows with that weight of arrow.

Just go hunt

From: bowhunter24
20-Aug-20
Shooting 50 lbs with 27 in draw I went with the micro dia arrow and 50 grain outsert 1 inch viper trick and get great penetration. I feel its a little late to change much just wouldn't recommend a mechanical broadhead with that set up. Good luck this season!

From: ohiohunter
20-Aug-20
You got the arrows, now it’s time to find a hair popping sharp Broadhead

From: Stayfit
20-Aug-20
Shooting 100 grain slick tricks and had success in the past at 60 pounds. Thanks for the sage advice. Don't disagree at all with the advice to go heavier but I think I'll stick with the tuned setup and not make changes due to the limited time left. Will limit shot distance. Have fun... Shoot straight

From: Out-there
21-Aug-20
So if you shoot a light arrow and keep your shot distance at close ranges (I'm thinking 40 yds or less), everything is fine? Then what is the advantage to shooting a light arrow? Not trying to be argumentative, just curious. Why wouldn't you want a bigger club?

From: Shawn
21-Aug-20
Guy and gals kill elk every year shooting recurves,longbows and self bows that are 40 to 45 pounds and shooting arrows that weigh 360 to 450 grains. Again, a tuned bow and arrow combo you shoot accurately with a scary sharp head will easily do the job. Shawn

From: SBH
21-Aug-20
Out-there,

I think the advantage to the light arrow in that set up is speed. Since he's not pulling a lot of poundage a heavy arrow is going to be a lot slower. I dunno the differences exactly but that's the way I see it. Would have to do the math to figure out the KE and loss of impact downrange I suppose to truly know what a guy is missing out on as bow poundage goes down and arrow weight goes up.

From: Bou'bound
21-Aug-20
my opinion is there is no way a 38 gram addition to the arrow will result in anything near acceptable flight. That is nearly an ounce and half at the tip of the shaft. I think you mean grains which is about 0.08 of an ounce and you'd be good to go.

From: carcus
21-Aug-20
Id want a slightly heavier arrow, 400 spine fmj will get you there.

From: bowbender77
21-Aug-20
The answer to your question is ...yes.

From: ohiohunter
21-Aug-20
Majority here will say heavier, but all things considered there is no reason to implement a last minute equipment change, unless of course he’s changing Broadheads from rage to iron will.

From: Outdoorsdude
21-Aug-20
Razor sharp COC (may I suggest Stinger Buzzcuts), limit shots to 30yd, pick a spot and follow through...

From: ohiohunter
21-Aug-20
Majority here will say heavier, but all things considered there is no reason to implement a last minute equipment change, unless of course he’s changing Broadheads from rage to iron will.

From: 320 bull
21-Aug-20
Stay fussy with distance and shot angle and use your current setup with a 2 blade COC head. You will be fine being that you recognize your limitations. A steep quartering away or any quartering to would be off limits if I were shooting that setup but a broadside elk at 20 yards is getting both bags punched IMO

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