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What Weight training exercise
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Skippy 01-Sep-20
Bloodtrail 01-Sep-20
midwest 01-Sep-20
Norseman 01-Sep-20
craigmcalvey 01-Sep-20
Bloodtrail 01-Sep-20
LKH 01-Sep-20
Deertick 01-Sep-20
Scar Finga 01-Sep-20
Skippy 01-Sep-20
Hawkeye 01-Sep-20
Bloodtrail 01-Sep-20
Old Reb 01-Sep-20
Aces11 01-Sep-20
EMB 02-Sep-20
PTArcher 02-Sep-20
Rocky D 02-Sep-20
Lost Arra 02-Sep-20
Lost Arra 02-Sep-20
Rocky D 02-Sep-20
Skippy 02-Sep-20
EMB 02-Sep-20
Lost Arra 02-Sep-20
GF 03-Sep-20
Skippy 03-Sep-20
EMB 03-Sep-20
Skippy 03-Sep-20
Empty Freezer 03-Sep-20
Lost Arra 04-Sep-20
Skippy 04-Sep-20
Skippy 04-Sep-20
Skippy 04-Sep-20
Skippy 04-Sep-20
Lost Arra 05-Sep-20
LKH 05-Sep-20
Al Dente Laptop 06-Sep-20
Skippy 06-Sep-20
Skippy 09-Sep-20
TNRAMBLINMAN 22-Sep-20
From: Skippy
01-Sep-20
What weight training exercise do most guys use to work the muscle groups for pulling and holding a compound? Any exercises with dumbbells would be great. Thanks

From: Bloodtrail
01-Sep-20
One arm dumb bell rows on a bench. And two arm bent over dumb bell rows standing. Heavy curls. You pull with your back and rear delt, so anything that works those muscle will be great.

From: midwest
01-Sep-20
I like to use bands at the end of a shoulder workout for a burnout set. I wrap the band around a post and do several reps pulling it just like I'm drawing a bow.

With dumbells, I'll do monster sets of side raises, front raises, and bent over flyes.

Make your shoulders bulletproof!

From: Norseman
01-Sep-20
Walk up hill with buckets Of sand.

From: craigmcalvey
01-Sep-20
Resistance is the key for me. I use something like the Bowflex system.

From: Bloodtrail
01-Sep-20

Bloodtrail's embedded Photo
Go as heavy as you can on these...you’re using lots of muscle.
Bloodtrail's embedded Photo
Go as heavy as you can on these...you’re using lots of muscle.
Here ya go....

From: LKH
01-Sep-20
Holding a compound????? What's that take, 10-12#? Get an old recurve and pull and hold that. Best exercise possible.

From: Deertick
01-Sep-20
Pulling ... you can do barbell rows, pull-ups, chin-ups, lever rows, Pendley rows ... deadlifts help. Power cleans, snatches, flies. Here's the deal ... while strength is specific, generalizing can make exercise more tolerable. I try to do a squats, deadlifts, bench presses and overhead presses weekly with some accessory lifts thrown in just to add volume (rather than intensity). I'm lifting numbers more than I did 30 years ago ... and I STILL AM A LOUSY SHOT.

If you need to rehab, start low, increase slow, and hope for the best -- or use a professional to guide you.

From: Scar Finga
01-Sep-20
I do 12 oz curls! 1 can at a time! Is this a serious question? Do what you can to be in shape for the hunts you can do! Go slow, don't hurt yourself and if you are injured listen to your doctor or PT!

Good Luck!

From: Skippy
01-Sep-20
Yes it’s a real question. It’s not so much holding the compound it’s pulling it. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries. I was just curious about what shoulder exercises other people do. Thanks for the replies and help.

From: Hawkeye
01-Sep-20
I feel that kettlebell swings are tough to beat for full body strength and power. Add a pair of push up bars and you can do some damage in a short amount of time.

From: Bloodtrail
01-Sep-20
Skippy, ohhhhhhh......you didn’t say shoulder exercises.....

If you’re looking for good ones to build the small muscles in the shoulder for both rehab and prevention of injury, Google Jobe Shoulder Exercises. I’ve done these for many many years playing baseball and obviously after playing, and they work wonders.

If you’re looking for adding shoulder power and strength, stick with basic movements and know your limitations. AND work around any pain you might have from surgery. Don’t work through it.....work around it.

From: Old Reb
01-Sep-20
I agree with Scar Finga. Go light and slow at first. Too much too fast will lead to injuries and then you will really have a hard time drawing your bow. Maybe you should consider lowering your draw wieght and increase it is as you gain strength. Shooting your bow will work the muscles that you need to draw your bow.

From: Aces11
01-Sep-20
At the gym I find a cable machine you can adjust the height. I put it at the level I would be drawing back and then do practice draws.

From: EMB
02-Sep-20
In addition to lots of shoulder, chest, and back exercises, the best all around archery conditioning exercise I've found is the Saunders Archery Power Pull with Weights. Here's the link: https://sausa.com/product/power-pull-weight-options/ It's basically a bow handle with tubing and weights. Good luck.

From: PTArcher
02-Sep-20
Skippy, If you have had 5 prior shoulder surgeries, chances are your foundational muscles (e.g. rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers) are not in good shape. Bloodtrail's suggestion of Jobe exercises would be an example of exercises for these areas. If you are looking for long-term success, these should be addressed prior to more archery specific movements such as heavy rowing, pulling, etc. My suggestion would be to see a good PT, that also understands what you want to accomplish, to get you started in the right direction. Your history suggests you need a program specifically designed for you moreso than a generic program that may be ok for others. Best of Luck!!

From: Rocky D
02-Sep-20

Rocky D's embedded Photo
Rocky D's embedded Photo
Skippy, The back is the primary muscle group that pulls a bow. Your shoulder is the the primary joint that supports this movement. Your shoulder rehab exercises should strengthen the shoulder.

Many people do not do these as long as long as they should. My doctor said that it would take a year to regain 100% of my strength back when I did my surgery. Here are some points to consider.

1. Make sure that you are drawing the bow correctly. Incorrect drawing is a slow road to future shoulder problems.

2. The shoulder has three heads that supports the shoulder. Most people have under developed front and mid heads. Sadly, an over developed rear head many times supports drawing heavier weight than their front and mid heads cannot support over time. This along with improper drawing is probably the leading cause of archers having shoulder problems.

3. To draw more weight I would focus on upper back exercises and Your abdominal core. Heavier weight with lower weight builds strength better than higher reps which often lead to muscle fatigue and future injury.

4. Initially bands or a universal machine is better for injury prevention than free weights (dumb bells) because they provide more stability.

5. Injury prevention should be goal number one because we have to start back at ground zero.

The attached photo may help better understand what muscles actually are used to draw a bow.

From: Lost Arra
02-Sep-20
Just get stronger than you are now. Anything works at first but pretty quickly the progressive loading of bands and dumbbells hits a wall because they work a small amount of muscle. That's when you move to barbells. Deertick's trinity of squats, deadlifts and pressing is a perfect place to start. Vanity lifting (curls, other than the 12 oz version) is more for the beach than the woods.

From: Lost Arra
02-Sep-20
Rotator cuff specific exercises : google Crossover Symmetry.

From: Rocky D
02-Sep-20
X2, PT Archer

From: Skippy
02-Sep-20
My bow is set to 58 pounds at a 28 inch draw. My last shoulder surgery was 3 1/2 years ago. One of my main goals is to get where I can have longer practice sessions with less fatigue. A lot of great information on here thanks for your help.

From: EMB
02-Sep-20
X3 PTArcher. I broke the proximal head of my right humerus diagonally across the ball-in 2 pieces. I ended up with a locking plate and numerous screws in my shoulder, and of course, I'm right-handed. In addition to my PT, both formal and self-imposed, I found the Power Pull extremely helpful in developing the strength and stamina necessary to build up to longer practice sessions. The Power Pull is only $25. As a point of reference I cranked my bow to the lowest draw weight (55 lbs maybe) and started with shooting 2 arrows hoping to hit somewhere on the 20 yard bag. Good luck.

From: Lost Arra
02-Sep-20
I would suggest that long practice sessions are not necessary and may be harmful for anyone over 40 but especially for someone with a bad/repaired shoulder. Archery is just too fun but it puts huge demands on shoulders. My scapula was fractured in a cycling accident 25 years ago followed by major non-scope surgery and if I limit my practice sessions in both duration and frequency I have no problems. If I over do things I'm reminded quickly and it affects the next practice. We are not going to war with deer and elk. It only takes one good shot.

From: GF
03-Sep-20
Lost Arra is making good sense.... but for me, it’s like potato chips... Said the guy who has shot himself lopsided.... With my newest (and heaviest) bow, I’ve been planning to limit myself to maybe 2 dozen shots/session tops....

One thought, though....

If you’re shooting a compound and just hunting deer/bear/normal hogs, there’s not much reason to worry about drawing more than #40 or so; maybe #50 for Elk?

A compound just stores so much more energy than a stickbow, and plenty of Elk have been taken cleanly with #45 longbows by folks who wait for their shot and don’t lose their... stuff.

Just seems that after 5 surgeries, you should know better than to ask around here; there are plenty of people who’ve worked with you, know what you can do, and will help you prevent #6.

From: Skippy
03-Sep-20
What do you consider a long practice session? I shoot between 12 and 16 arrows per session. I am going to turn my poundage down to closer to 50lbs. There won’t be a number 6.

From: EMB
03-Sep-20
I can physically shoot a lot of arrows. But at some point my form and accuracy start to diminish. I try to stop at that point. That could be anywhere between 15 and 25 arrows. If I can get that many well executed shots, I'm good.

From: Skippy
03-Sep-20
What do you consider a long practice session? I shoot between 12 and 16 arrows per session. I am going to turn my poundage down to closer to 50lbs. There won’t be a number 6.

03-Sep-20
i have a metal rod thats 4' long and weighs 6lbs. i take it on every walk and hike. Made a huge difference in shoulder fatigue after carrying your bow around all day. Just something that works for me. Keep Hammerin

From: Lost Arra
04-Sep-20
Skippy: my personal practice limit is two dozen shots but if number 14 or 15 is a perfect heart shot on a 3D target or 10 ring on a target face I usually quit right there.

From: Skippy
04-Sep-20
What weight training exercise do most guys use to work the muscle groups for pulling and holding a compound? Any exercises with dumbbells would be great. Thanks

From: Skippy
04-Sep-20
Yes it’s a real question. It’s not so much holding the compound it’s pulling it. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries. I was just curious about what shoulder exercises other people do. Thanks for the replies and help.

From: Skippy
04-Sep-20
My bow is set to 58 pounds at a 28 inch draw. My last shoulder surgery was 3 1/2 years ago. One of my main goals is to get where I can have longer practice sessions with less fatigue. A lot of great information on here thanks for your help.

From: Skippy
04-Sep-20
What do you consider a long practice session? I shoot between 12 and 16 arrows per session. I am going to turn my poundage down to closer to 50lbs. There won’t be a number 6.

From: Lost Arra
05-Sep-20
I'm not a compound bow expert but I learned that the draw cycle can vary a lot between brands/models and some bows are more kind to aging, sore shoulders. Find one that is more forgiving.

I'm a believer in general strength training separate from your specific activity (archery). While I'm a barbell fan it's hard to argue with some dumbbell rowing as an assistance exercise for archery.

From: LKH
05-Sep-20
If you're having pull issues, try pushing. I used to take my buddies 80# compound and hold the string to my cheek and then push the bow out to full draw. Maybe that would work for those with pull arm issues????

Oh but to have that strength still.

06-Sep-20
You can use dumbbells to mimic the push/pull motion of drawing your bow. Stand as if you were going to draw your bow, with a dumbbell in each hand, starting from the middle of your chest, push/pull with your hands. Do 15 reps, then alternate the push/pull with the opposite hands to equalize the workout. Do 8 sets, start with light weight, then gradually increase as time progresses. Then do 4 sets of 5, where you know hold the weight for 10 seconds each time. There is also an exercise bar meant for rotator cuff prevention/rehab, it is called the shoulder horn. It looks like a crazy bent barbell. It isolates the rotator cuff within the shoulder girdle so you cannot use other muscles to cheat or assist during the exercises.

From: Skippy
06-Sep-20
Thanks again guys. I also turned my bow down to 52 pounds wow what a difference 6 pounds makes

From: Skippy
09-Sep-20
Thanks again guys. I also turned my bow down to 52 pounds wow what a difference 6 pounds makes

From: TNRAMBLINMAN
22-Sep-20
Great thread. I have already researched many of the suggestions and am doing more rotater cuff exercises, which I really think is going to make a difference. Also realized I maybe needed to lighten up with a few exercises I was doing. Even with very light weights it is surprising how taxing the rotater cuff sets can be. I am 55, shoot 62 lbs, and no matter how much I work out a dozen shots at a time is about all my physical or mental concentration allow for. Sometimes I will do shoot am and pm, but generally never more than 20-24 shots a day.

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