HuntStand Hunting App
Two different contacts and archery
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
rershooter 15-Sep-20
GF 15-Sep-20
fastflight 15-Sep-20
Grubby 16-Sep-20
Bowhunter555 16-Sep-20
rershooter 16-Sep-20
BOWNUT 16-Sep-20
rershooter 17-Sep-20
Bill in MI 17-Sep-20
BOWNUT 17-Sep-20
DanaC 17-Sep-20
poultrygeist 17-Sep-20
JohnMC 17-Sep-20
longbeard 17-Sep-20
Yellowjacket 17-Sep-20
Bake 17-Sep-20
BOWNUT 17-Sep-20
Bill in MI 17-Sep-20
JB 17-Sep-20
JB 17-Sep-20
Buffalo1 17-Sep-20
Bowhunter555 18-Sep-20
Russ Koon 20-Sep-20
'Ike' (Phone) 20-Sep-20
From: rershooter
15-Sep-20
I'm going to try the two different contacts for my vision. One for distance and one for reading. I am a right handed compound shooter, right eye dominant. Question is, which eye should I have the reading contact and what eye for distance? Peep and pin shooter

From: GF
15-Sep-20
I would ask for samples that would let you try it both ways so you find out what works for YOU.

Your other good option would be to put distance vision contacts in on both sides when you go to shoot. Wear some drugstore cheaters for close-up work.

From: fastflight
15-Sep-20
Or, make sure to try the new multifocal contacts if you are near sighted and starting to have trouble seeing close up due to age.

From: Grubby
16-Sep-20
I’m using bifocal contacts this year, I think they are working pretty well

From: Bowhunter555
16-Sep-20
I have my reading contact in my left eye and, distance contact in my right. Like you I am right eye dominant, it has worked for me for over ten years.

From: rershooter
16-Sep-20
Bowhunter555. How do your pins look?

From: BOWNUT
16-Sep-20
I'm right eye dominant. I have a 2.50 in my right eye and a 1.00 in my left. I shoot with both eyes open and my pins are clear and so is the target. Take your bow to the eye doctor and try them out. They have samples on hand. I ware glasses with bifocals all the time and only ware the contacts when I'm bowhunting and golfing. Its much easier to read greens without bifocals.

From: rershooter
17-Sep-20
Bownut, those are nut bifocal contacts, correct?

From: Bill in MI
17-Sep-20
I'm on this struggle as we speak. I wore contacts for years no issue but now in my mid 40's I need close up help besides distance. On my 3rd trial pair as of today and we'll see. I'm left eye dom, right handed, shooting (learned) right handed. I am now opting for distance contacts (readers up close) hoping for crispness I can seem to find across medium and long range viewing...sucks so far.

From: BOWNUT
17-Sep-20
They are not there standard lenses. I ware glasses for reading this set up is just for hunting although I can read my phone with no problem It's not good for every day reading. You want to be able to see your pins and have a clear target. You probably will have to compromise on your reading ability.

From: DanaC
17-Sep-20
Get contacts for distance and use reading glasses.

From: poultrygeist
17-Sep-20
... I have used the different power contacts for almost 20 years. The only problem that i have is " if you are hunting", the low light situations you have in the woods in the evenings is in trying to focus, and the depth perception is impaired. I use my far vision in both eyes now for hunting, an for me it helps a lot. I shoot stick bows, and shoot with both eyes open, so i really need the focus and depth perception for that late evening shot.

From: JohnMC
17-Sep-20
Also started wearing bifocal contacts this year. I have liked them for both hunting/shooting and life in general.

From: longbeard
17-Sep-20
I too have a reading contact in my left eye and a distance lens in my right. I’m right eye dominant and this has worked out great for about 6 years now

From: Yellowjacket
17-Sep-20
I'm left eye dominant and shoot left handed. I wear a .75 in my left eye and 3.25 in my right eye for close up. Works well for me.

I don't find depth perception to be a problem except for close up tasks, like threading a needle.

From: Bake
17-Sep-20
Personally, I would ask my eye doctor. There are some eye guys on here that may answer though . . . .

My eye doctor knows that I'm a bowhunter and that my vision in my dominant right eye is very important to me. I've made it very clear that vision while hunting is a priority for me. And my eye doctor has been very helpful.

Ask 'em. And if they ain't hunter friendly, find a new one . . . .

From: BOWNUT
17-Sep-20
X2 Bake

From: Bill in MI
17-Sep-20
Ok, so far 2 distance contacts are so much better, your mileage may vary. Best of luck on the quest!

From: JB
17-Sep-20
I did mono vision Lasix (sp?). Right eye dominant and did right eye far away vision. Love it, but definitely need to shoot with left eye closed.

From: JB
17-Sep-20

From: Buffalo1
17-Sep-20
When I had lasik surgery I had my eyes set up for distance on left eye and right eye set for close up (reading). Never had a problem. I could easily see a golf ball at 200-250 yds.

I then had to have cataract on left eye. Once again I went with distance lens in left. I can still see golf ball at 200-250 yds. My right eye is not quite ready for surgery, but when the time comes, I will get the close up lens.

As I aged reading glasses were required.

I am right handed and am right eye dominant. I shot my bow with left eye closed.

This is my story and I'm sticking to it !!

From: Bowhunter555
18-Sep-20
Pinso aren't as sharp as they were in my thirties, but clearer than they are with glasses.

From: Russ Koon
20-Sep-20
I have tried many different combinations of correction in my vision in both eyes while shooting the bow and bowhunting through almost sixty years of doing both.

I very much prefer using my contact lenses while hunting, and I definitely want the aiming eye to be corrected for best focus at thirty inches distance from my eye on the right side. Maximizing the sharpness of vision with the aiming eye makes the pin seem brighter in the reduced light conditions when the deer are usually moving best, and with the non-aiming eye corrected for maximum distance vision, the brain automatically selects the sharper image so you get the benefit of distance vision for finding the animal, and the best vision of the pin when trying to see it in the lower light and making a precise placement of the pin on the animal.

I do normally close my left (non-aiming) eye as I come to full draw, to prevent the occasional confusion that can occur in some lighting conditions when the images are close to being equally sharp and the brain can be tricked into providing a double image of the target/animal. It has only occurred to me rarely, but is pretty much impossible to detect when it happens until I unexpectedly shoot a foot or so left on a thirty yard shot that felt perfect! Practicing to close the non-aiming eye as I get to full draw took a while to become part of my natural shot sequence, but was worth it in eliminating that occasional problem while keeping the benefits of the best vision for the job in the eye in use at the time.

20-Sep-20
Anyone use a ‘clarifier’ ...Hit 58 this year and feeling it in the eye dept...

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