Mathews Inc.
Grizzly Attack Dead Hunter any details?
Bears
Contributors to this thread:
SteveB 23-Sep-20
Cornpone 23-Sep-20
Jeff Holchin 23-Sep-20
JL 23-Sep-20
Pyrannah 23-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 24-Sep-20
Old School 24-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 24-Sep-20
ground hunter 24-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 24-Sep-20
orionsbrother 24-Sep-20
Zbone 24-Sep-20
Nick Muche 25-Sep-20
DonVathome 25-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 25-Sep-20
Old School 25-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 25-Sep-20
LBshooter 25-Sep-20
drycreek 25-Sep-20
Pete In Fairbanks 25-Sep-20
SteveB 25-Sep-20
Bowfinatic 26-Sep-20
Charlie Rehor 26-Sep-20
greg simon 26-Sep-20
Zbone 27-Sep-20
Primeshooter04 27-Sep-20
altitude sick 27-Sep-20
Sand man 27-Sep-20
TrapperKayak 28-Sep-20
Bou'bound 28-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 29-Sep-20
APauls 29-Sep-20
Zbone 30-Sep-20
IdyllwildArcher 30-Sep-20
Kevin Dill 30-Sep-20
drycreek 30-Sep-20
LINK 30-Sep-20
GF 30-Sep-20
Shuteye 30-Sep-20
Cliffhanger 04-Oct-20
Old School 05-Oct-20
Charlie Rehor 05-Oct-20
From: SteveB
23-Sep-20

SteveB's Link

From: Cornpone
23-Sep-20
Can't take all that popup crap.

From: Jeff Holchin
23-Sep-20
Richlandsource.com article says the 22 year old hunter had killed a moose and was taking care of the moose when the bear attacked and killed him. It also says that his partner then killed the bear.

From: JL
23-Sep-20
Were any BS-ers up there hunting??

From: Pyrannah
23-Sep-20
What a horrible situation

From: Kevin Dill
24-Sep-20
The Hawaiians have a saying "Never turn your back on the ocean"....meaning a rogue wave is waiting and has taken lives before. Butchering any animal in grizzly country is basically an invitation for trouble to show up. Best to be well armed and vigilant.

From: Old School
24-Sep-20
Kevin - have you had any approach you while you were quartering/processing your moose?

-Mitch

From: Kevin Dill
24-Sep-20
No. The closest I came to trouble was when I killed a bull almost a mile from camp. I spent the day butchering and packing loads of meat to get them a couple hundred yards from the carcass. I didn’t have time to finish everything so went back in the morning. I knew enough to go slow and scrutinize the entire area. I finished butchering and got the rest of the meat away followed by the head. I spent the reminder of the day carrying loads of meat. The next morning my pilot flew in for the load. He jumped out of the plane and asked me if I was finished at the carcass. I told him I was and it was only then he told me a huge dark silvertip was squarely on the carcass when he flew over. I saw the bear a day or two later when I flew out. Gorgeous.

I 100% always have a firearm parked at the carcass when I’m butchering. My favorite is a short .45-70 takedown guide gun. If I have to shoot, I want to absolutely kill or disable with one or maybe 2 shots.

24-Sep-20
always easy to comment on the other hunter, in a situation that you were not in, or know nothing about,,,, hunting in grizzly country is always dangerous, its that simple,,,,

From: Kevin Dill
24-Sep-20

Kevin Dill's Link
https://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/story/news/2020/09/23/mansfield-ohio-man-killed-by-grizzly-bear-alaska-hunting-trip/3506574001/

More details here.

24-Sep-20
Very unfortunate. Terrible for his friend and his family.

From: Zbone
24-Sep-20

Zbone's Link
Condolences to family and friends... Here is more details:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/officials-hunter-killed-in-surprise-grizzly-bear-attack-in-alaska-identified/ar-BB19oVUj?ocid=spartan-dhp-feeds

Just curious about the site... I know Alaska is different by many means but unaware of hunting in national parks, I thought a national parks were a national parks: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Anybody know the regs in national parks in Alaska or are they all different by location?

From: Nick Muche
25-Sep-20
He was likely in the Preserve, which anyone can hunt.

From: DonVathome
25-Sep-20
Tragic. I live in Ohio and was moose hunting in AK last year, odd coincidence.

From: Kevin Dill
25-Sep-20
And to a comment above:

Hunting in grizzly country is not always dangerous....no more so than plenty of other activities which expose us to risk. I've spent a lot of time hunting in grizzly country, both with a partner and without, and the element of danger (from bears) is far over-stated. Yes...a grizzly is a dangerous animal without doubt. So is a drunk driver and I'll bet we all have more close calls (if unaware) with impaired drivers than we'll ever know. It doesn't mean driving or hunting (grizz area) are automatically dangerous...we just know there's risk. We understand and try to minimize or contend with it. I also believe any hunter flying into grizzly country is statistically more likely to get injured in an aircraft incident than by a bear.

I guess in the end "it's dangerous" is simply a subjective statement. My mom thought it was dangerous to climb trees as a kid. Here I am scurrying 25' up in the dark on a cold morning. Maybe it's a matter of degree. On a 1-10 scale I'd put hunting in grizzly country at about a 3.0. My big 2-wheeler is probably a 3.0 to me. Your numbers won't be the same undoubtedly. But again....any look at the statistics will prove you are extremely unlikely to get injured as long as you operate with a degree of caution.

From: Old School
25-Sep-20
Appreciate your perspective Kevin. Although not a likely avenue of death for me, something about bowhunting around Griz intimidates me.

From: Kevin Dill
25-Sep-20
Old School: I get it. It comes down to a level of anxiety, emotion, fear, etc. For some people, sleeping in a tent with grizzlies around is like swimming in shark-infested waters. It sounds ill-advised or frankly dangerous. One person gets hurt and that confirms the danger (to many), but not the odds of it happening to any one person. I think the best way to deal with the emotions related to perceived risk and danger (bears) is to: 1) look at it statistically and believe in it. 2) Get bear-wise in a realistic fashion and use it to improve safety. 3) Get out there and get some real experience which will help allay much of the unfounded worries.

From: LBshooter
25-Sep-20
One of the risks hunters take when they venture into the wilds of Alaska or any wild place with bears, especially griz, A tragedy for sure. The one thing that strikes me is that he and partner had no defensive weapons at hand while walking in on a meat pile the next day. I remember watching an episode of "the last Alaskans" and Heimo was walking in on a moose kill the next morning and he and his wife were both toting 12 gauges. As they were walking in he said, this is one of the most dangerous things you can do, because if a bear has claimed the meat he is not going to give it up. It's unfortunate and very sad for his family, may they find some peace with the fact that this young man died doing something he loved doing.

From: drycreek
25-Sep-20
Kevin, I was thinking the same thing as I was reading this. I had to take my dog to the eye doc in Dallas this morning and had to be there at 8:15. I think I’d just as soon take my chances with a grizz than fight that rush hour traffic with those idiots. :-)

25-Sep-20
It is one thing to just say that you accept the risk (however small...) of hunting in grizzly country.

It's a whole 'nother level of risk to not bother to have a firearm with you when you return to a kill site.

In my book, that's just not real smart. In my experience, it is increasing your risk, not doing a thing to mitigate that risk and in fact, ASKING for problems.

Pete

From: SteveB
25-Sep-20
And I can tell you from experience that they move so fast it’s hard to imagine. If you’re not watching for it I doubt even a gun would help.

26-Sep-20
This is a close family friend to an acquaintance of mine 2 of them were cutting up the moose. One left to haul a load of meat. On his was back a bear charged him. He shot it 10 times When he arrived back at the moose this young man was dead. Tragic for sure Prayers for the family

26-Sep-20
Western states grizzlies are very dangerous. Over populated and not hunted allow them free rein. The majority of bad Bear encounters are in the lower 48.

From: greg simon
26-Sep-20
Was the bear killed? I’m seeing conflicting reports on that.

From: Zbone
27-Sep-20
Good question Greg, a now likely wounded man killing grizzly out there likely will not be pleasant no the next human it crosses paths...

27-Sep-20
At least he died doing what he loved.

27-Sep-20
It’s the 1st bear fatality in the park which is a very large area. So it’s rare indeed.

Flying in and out, or using a knife are probably higher risk level.

However, I do like the short 45-70 idea Even a short barreled 30-30 has more punch than most handguns carried. And much easier to get on target accurately. As Kevin mentioned, After the kill a rifle would be better.

From: Sand man
27-Sep-20
My dad’s been a pilot / guide in Alaska for 30+ years.

He’s always said wolfs are of a bigger concern than bears & that the gun of choice is a Remington 870 12 gauge with slugs.

He has pointed out the fact that there are more “conflicts” with Black bears as well.

I guess people don’t see the danger associated with a “smaller” bear...

From: TrapperKayak
28-Sep-20
"...called a "surprise attack." Condolences to the family and friends of the young man. However, I think I would personally prefer this kind of a griz attack over a 'planned' one and not have to lay awake all the previous night worrying about the potential outcome.

From: Bou'bound
28-Sep-20
Died doing what he loved? What exactly was that ....... being mauled by a bear. That’s how he died. There is no consolation to this tragedy.

From: Kevin Dill
29-Sep-20
I'd rather have the bear die...."doing what he loved". And to that end:

From: APauls
29-Sep-20
I don't usually fawn over guns Kevin but my my, that is a piece.

From: Zbone
30-Sep-20
Yeah, that's a real nice piece... I want one...8^)

Always wanted one of those short barrel 45-70 Marlin guide rifles but didn't know they now make them in take down versions... Can I ask what model that is Kevin? Or did that come from the custom shop?

Thanks....

Thing about the 45-70, you can single shoot a 2.5" .410 shot shell out of them making the great in a survival situation... Luv .410s...

30-Sep-20
Kevin is so right. The reality is that there is risk, but the scariness often times is far greater than the actual risk. Interstate freeways have incredible risk for how little people are afraid of them compared with bears. A car can kill you a lot faster than a bear can and does so thousands of times more per year than bears.

Guys are afraid of bears. Guys are afraid of the dark. Spiders, snakes, etc. It’s completely irrational.

The only thing I’m afraid of is things I have no control over that can hurt my family while I’m not around. Otherwise, there’s no reason for fear. You can look a bear or snake in the eyes and get over your fear. Embracing the odds of you dying helps, as does a gun like Kevin’s. Logic helps a lot.

This past July, I took my 13 year old daughter on a 6 day raft trip in the Brooks Range. This was just a couple drainages from where I’d been charged to close range the year prior by a large boar Grizz and discharged my 10mm.

I’m no idiot. I wouldn’t put my child in a situation that would recklessly endanger her health. This was daily life thousands of years ago. We just have become completely risk averse because of urbanization.

We saw two large Grizz and got stalked by a wolf, all chased off by a guy with a 12 gauge with barely a worry. And my daughter sawed logs each night in the tent.

She tells everyone all about it and is that much more confident from this day forward. A stronger person for it. Her friends think she’s crazy. I think she’s reasonable, well-educated, and brave as everyone should be.

If you’re afraid of bears or snakes or whatever, don’t take my word for it, talk with her. Her courage is infectious. All 90 lbs of it.

From: Kevin Dill
30-Sep-20
If I could give a round of standing applause to Ike I would: "We just have become completely risk averse because of urbanization."

This is an absolutely straightforward and honest statement. Almost from the get-go we are raised to abhor anything which can harm or kill us. It's one thing to have respect for the risks you take...another entirely to feel fear or a sense of endangerment because of what might happen, regardless of the odds against it. We're societally programming our kids and selves to be intolerant of actual or possible harm they/we might encounter in the REAL world, instead of keeping things realistic. We make grizzlies into iconic objects of horror and death...feared and loathed...yet we risk our lives in many ways we pass off easily. I try to save my fear for those times when the iron is in the fire....and I've been there a few times.

This isn't a gun forum, but then we're not talking about hunting with guns. Defensive weaponry is a legit topic for bowhunters who might have to deal with a bad bear. My rifle above started as an un-fired JM-series Marlin Guide Gun. I found it for sale and bought it. Then I had a lot of customizing done by a superb smith I found. Takedown conversion. Shorten barrel. Bigger lever. Hone the action. Skinner sights. Shorten the stock and bob the corners of the recoil pad. Delete the safety. Cerakote all the metal. It carries small and comes up lightning quick. Pull the trigger and feel the thunder. Not for everyone, but I love it for my purposes.

And Ike...I'd love meeting your daughter and hearing her stories.

From: drycreek
30-Sep-20
Perfect posts, both Ike and Kevin. I’ve never hunted bear country but I can see the wisdom in the posts of those that have. Like a Boy Scout, be prepared !

This applies even more so to our daily lives. There are things going on in our world that are much more dangerous to us and our families than any snake, wolf, or bear that we’ll ever encounter. It’s only gonna get worse, so be prepared 24/7/365.

From: LINK
30-Sep-20

LINK's Link
I like the dark series. Not as pretty as Kevin’s though. Thanks for making me want another gun Kevin.

From: GF
30-Sep-20
Interesting thing...

The backpacking trip with my son & his buddies has become an annual event; this year was a lot more challenging - about 25 miles and a boatload of elevation - a good chunk of it gained VERY quickly.

Afterwards my son mentioned that he had noticed that his stride had become a lot more confident. You can see it in the way that he walks; it’s nothing at all like “swagger”, it’s something quieter and entirely purposeful. He said it was because after after 3 1/2 days of making careful note of where he was going to place each step, he just Knew Something that he hadn’t been aware of previously. Something very good to see in a kid starting his senior year.

Good stuff.

From: Shuteye
30-Sep-20
Ol' Fred Bear use to pack a 44 Mag revolver when hunting dangerous bears. The one time he really needed it, it was on his horse. I sat the mount of his grizzly and couldn't believe how tall it was. It was a standing mount and I stood there looking up in awe.

04-Oct-20

Cliffhanger 's embedded Photo
Cliffhanger 's embedded Photo
This guy had plans to feast on our moose.

From: Old School
05-Oct-20
Kevin - do you handload your cartridges or use factory ammo? If so, what do you use?

05-Oct-20
East of Yellowstone has different rules.

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