Moultrie Products
Solo hunts in Grizzly country
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Patdel 17-Dec-20
Kodiak 17-Dec-20
Mule Power 17-Dec-20
Old School 17-Dec-20
kentuckbowhnter 17-Dec-20
TurboT 17-Dec-20
DonVathome 17-Dec-20
elkmtngear 17-Dec-20
Grey Ghost 17-Dec-20
Dale06 17-Dec-20
Bowboy 17-Dec-20
Patdel 17-Dec-20
krieger 17-Dec-20
Mule Power 17-Dec-20
Owl 17-Dec-20
Rgiesey 17-Dec-20
Patdel 17-Dec-20
LINK 17-Dec-20
Owl 17-Dec-20
Patdel 17-Dec-20
Pop-r 17-Dec-20
Aspen Ghost 17-Dec-20
Pop-r 17-Dec-20
Lost Arra 17-Dec-20
Patdel 17-Dec-20
Mule Power 17-Dec-20
BTM 17-Dec-20
Striker@home 17-Dec-20
Rickm 17-Dec-20
WV Mountaineer 17-Dec-20
Milhouse 17-Dec-20
Patdel 17-Dec-20
Jaquomo 17-Dec-20
c3 17-Dec-20
Muleysareking 18-Dec-20
Patdel 18-Dec-20
DonVathome 18-Dec-20
Charlie Rehor 18-Dec-20
Grey Ghost 18-Dec-20
redquebec 18-Dec-20
LINK 18-Dec-20
Patdel 18-Dec-20
LINK 18-Dec-20
Ron Niziolek 18-Dec-20
MarkU 18-Dec-20
Bowfreak 18-Dec-20
Mule Power 18-Dec-20
Jason Stafford 18-Dec-20
Kodiak 18-Dec-20
Live2Hunt 18-Dec-20
Jason Stafford 18-Dec-20
MarkU 18-Dec-20
SmokedTrout 18-Dec-20
GF 18-Dec-20
Grey Ghost 18-Dec-20
Patdel 18-Dec-20
Ollie 18-Dec-20
ryanrc 18-Dec-20
Grey Ghost 18-Dec-20
Rgiesey 18-Dec-20
IdyllwildArcher 18-Dec-20
Patdel 18-Dec-20
Ron Niziolek 18-Dec-20
GF 18-Dec-20
Owl 19-Dec-20
Kevin Dill 19-Dec-20
Mule Power 19-Dec-20
LBshooter 19-Dec-20
LBshooter 19-Dec-20
RK 19-Dec-20
LBshooter 19-Dec-20
KSflatlander 19-Dec-20
IdyllwildArcher 20-Dec-20
Kevin Dill 20-Dec-20
BULELK1 20-Dec-20
Franzen 20-Dec-20
Elk97 22-Dec-20
Bowsiteguy 24-Dec-20
Thornton 24-Dec-20
Ron Niziolek 24-Dec-20
Bowsiteguy 25-Dec-20
elkocd 26-Dec-20
SBH 26-Dec-20
Bowboy 26-Dec-20
Panther Bone 26-Dec-20
70lbdraw 26-Dec-20
Kevin Dill 26-Dec-20
Panther Bone 26-Dec-20
Lefty 26-Dec-20
Elkpacker1 28-Dec-20
MathewsMan 28-Dec-20
bigswivle 29-Dec-20
flybyjohn 07-Jan-21
MathewsMan 07-Jan-21
MathewsMan 07-Jan-21
Bearshaft 07-Jan-21
MathewsMan 07-Jan-21
MathewsMan 07-Jan-21
Brotsky 08-Jan-21
Ron Niziolek 08-Jan-21
MathewsMan 08-Jan-21
From: Patdel
17-Dec-20
Next year I am most likely going on an elk hunt in Grizzly country. There were supposed to be four of us, but one guy backed out.

I would like to break off and hunt separately some, just to cover more ground and increase opportunity, but with the odd number that means I would be going it alone.

Any advice or suggestions from experienced guys? My main concern right now is finding enough sack to walk up the trail in the dark by myself.

If this is foolish, someone chime in and tell me so. Wil be day hunting, in and out. Not packing in and sleeping in the backcountry.

Id rather not mention specifics, even the state, because the internet blows spots up so fast, but the bears are thick. That's why we lost our fourth.

Comments and suggestions welcome

From: Kodiak
17-Dec-20
I gotta be honest, it doesn't sound fun.

From: Mule Power
17-Dec-20
I have no experience hunting in grizzly country in the lower 48 Pat. I have hunted solo in Alaska with griz tracks around but in my opinion that’s apples and oranges.

Personally I’d start up the trail a little before light because of the fact that I was close to human activity but I wouldn’t cover a ton of distance to be in prime hunting areas before light.

I also wouldn’t be trying to shoot an elk once it was only 2-3 hours before dark. Waiting an hour after a shot before looking for a dead elk that close to dark isn’t something Id suggest doing.

The fact that you say they are thick means taking ALL precautions. I know an outfitter who hunts the Gros Ventre in Wyoming and they do not hunt in the evening at all. They go out but just to locate elk and come up with a plan for the next morning.

I can’t help but think of the scenario last year where Mark Uptain was killed. With that in mind hunting is one thing but focusing on quartering an elk alone is a dicey proposition at any time of day. I’d have a partner for sure to do that and he’d be a level headed well armed one.

From: Old School
17-Dec-20
What Mule Power said

17-Dec-20
now way i would hunt that area alone. even with two or three i would mandate everyone in the party have plenty of firepower.

From: TurboT
17-Dec-20
Hunting in Grizz country really hightens my senses. Nothing is done without evaluation such as walking around thickets or willows. Probably slows me down and helps me to some degree. With that said it is different and not for everyone. I prefer to have a partner for a lot of reasons in Grizz country, but that is not always an option. I would make sure you are very proficient with pistol and or bear spray and always let someone know where you will be.

From: DonVathome
17-Dec-20
I have done it many times. First is this a REALLY bad griz area I know you said they are thick? There are areas I might not bowhunt solo, gun I would. Use common sense, pay attention, carry a powerful sidearm. I have to admit walking in/out alone with bow and bear spray literally down the same trails with fresh griz tracks daily made me anxious. I walked up trails griz and elk took down into hay fields. I made noise when in areas I could not see 100 yards.

From: elkmtngear
17-Dec-20
On my annual elk hunt, I often arrive up to a week before my Buddy and hunt solo, but if I were hunting Grizz Country, I would strongly reconsider.

From: Grey Ghost
17-Dec-20
A quick search shows there are about 11 bear attacks on humans per year in the US. About 14% of those are fatal. That's about 1.5 fatalities per year for all bears, not just grizzlies. Personally, I think driving to your hunting spot is probably more dangerous than hunting solo in grizzly country.

Matt

From: Dale06
17-Dec-20
Agree with Grey Ghost. I’ve hunted all over the west, some grizzly country, some not. Never carried. Had guide at times, he never carried. Hunted Alaska for brown bear, guide carried a 375 HH.

From: Bowboy
17-Dec-20
I've done it some. You just need to be cautious and smart. I would highly recommend you don't shoot an elk late in the evening. Have something like a Garmin Inreach just in case.

If you do shoot an elk solo get it butchered up and away from the caracas.

Ron Niziolek and Jason Stafford have done it for years and haven't been mauled.

From: Patdel
17-Dec-20
Bowboy, yeah I found an article Ron N wrote and it had some good advice.

I've got a 10mm, and an inreach and will have that and bear spray with me at all times.

I'm leaning towards mornings solo and meet up with the other guys in the afternoon.

From: krieger
17-Dec-20
Anyone that hunts in Grizz country without carrying a sidearm, is a fool, IMO. No way I would leave my personal safety to chance, I have folks that depend on me.

From: Mule Power
17-Dec-20
Maybe the question isn’t should I hunt alone where grizzlies are thick but instead are you ok with killing an elk alone there. A dead elk on the ground changes everything.

From: Owl
17-Dec-20
Don't take this the wrong way but were you planning to teleport there? Just trying to put things in perspective.

From: Rgiesey
17-Dec-20
I’ve hunted some by myself around grizzlies. Like to have a partner. I always have a handgun or shotgun. Doesn’t mean you could get it out. Ron N has been charged quite a bit. They just haven’t closed the deal. We’ve lost quite a bit of meat over the years.

From: Patdel
17-Dec-20
Owl, no I was planning on walking. I was just making the point that i will more than likely be uneasy about it in the dark. Might have to do like Mule power suggested and give up the first and last hour in prime areas to get in and out with some light.

Joe, if I shot one I would call the others for help. Worst case scenario I break it down myself move meat away from guts and carcass, take what I can. Come back with armed help for the rest.

From: LINK
17-Dec-20
“1.5 deaths” and most likely the two grizzly attacks. ;) So only two grizzly deaths in an area with what a 300 mile radius? There’s got to be what several thousand hunters and granola munchers hiking that area. So odds of dying to a grizz have to be what 1:25000. Call me an optimist but one day I think Ill draw a Caldera tag with nearly the same odds ;). I wouldn’t step out of the truck in a core grizzly area without a sidearm.

From: Owl
17-Dec-20
Patdel,

I'm referencing the trip to the unit not hiking or hunting. I think we're all a little uneasy while in big bear territory. Probably why we go those places. Still, the drive in is more likely to kill you.

Depending on where you're going, the kill could be a problem. Perhaps, consider hunting alone but recovering corporately.

From: Patdel
17-Dec-20
Owl, I misunderstood you. Three of us headed out in one truck. Its a long drive, and I always say that too. Driving out there is more likely to kill you than anything else. It's easy to say that, its another thing to still believe it when you're hearing noises you can't identify in the dark in Griz country.

Have to look into it a little more,but hoping to bring ATV and use it on the forest service roads so we all aren't relying on the one vehicle, and can get to different trailheads. Will take 2 trucks if absolutely necessary, but that is a last resort. Want to save on fuel and share driving.

From: Pop-r
17-Dec-20
Although I've never had to use it I keep a lil small marine air horn in my trailer for retrievals. I figure if you blow that thing on the way to your kill there'll not be a grizzly left in the entire drainage! Lol.

From: Aspen Ghost
17-Dec-20
The rate of grizzly attacks is 1 in 232,613 person travel days for hikes in the back country according to the national park service. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/injuries.htm

No stats for rate of grizzly attacks for someone cutting up an elk in the back country but I'm guessing they would be higher than ordinary hikers. And of course not all griz attacks are fatalities.

Is the drive more likely to kill you? Maybe. The fatality rate in the US is 1.13 deaths per 100 million miles traveled. https://www.iihs.org/topics/fatality-statistics/detail/state-by-state

From: Pop-r
17-Dec-20
Another thought...I've been trying to keep up with griz attacks the last several years in WY and MT and I can't recall a one that happened at night!

From: Lost Arra
17-Dec-20
Is the elk hunting success rate significantly higher in these grizzly areas? I've never understood the attraction.

I've hunted in a grizzly area once while in college in the early 70's. My college roommate was a local and we were on horses. Mine was Tony. We came upon some fresh grizzly tracks in a willow thicket and I asked my roommate if there was anything special I needed to know. He replied: "Just hold on because if a bear is close Tony will get out of there before you ever see it but if you fall off Tony's not coming back"

From: Patdel
17-Dec-20
Pop-r. Thats interesting. I have to wonder if its just because most people aren't dumb enough to roam around grizzly country in the dark?

From: Mule Power
17-Dec-20
1 in 232,613huh? I remember three years ago I decided to apply for my Wyoming elk license in the regular drawing instead of the special. Why not when the odds were 97% with the points I had. Guess who didn’t draw! I was ready to hang myself. I’ve never been much of a gambler but after that I always play it safe. You could also say “Someone is going to get killed by a grizzly next year. Are you ok with it being you?”

Lost Arra.... there are definitely some bigger bulls in the grizzly areas of Wyoming than there are further south and east. Less hunters too. 1 less every year! Lol

From: BTM
17-Dec-20
In addition to the good tips above, have a good, bright flashlight (and a spare) and use it when hiking in the dark.

From: Striker@home
17-Dec-20
As a Wyoming resident for 30 years, I have hunted and backpacked extensively in grizzly country. I only carry spray and certainly have a heightened sense of awareness when in those areas. I'm not afraid. Cautious, yes. Prepared (by my standards) yes. Many don't have the stomach for it, but in all the 1000's of miles and 100's of nights I've spent out in those environs, I've only had one day of truly unsettling interactions with bears. The story of that morning is below.

I teasingly tell all of my students at the beginning of each year that I’m an elkaholic. There’s probably even some truth to the statement as my favorite time of the year involves archery hunting elk in September. Unfortunately, over the years it has become more and more difficult to draw tags in my local region of the Bighorns, so when unsuccessful with both my first and second choices in the 2016 drawings, I was left with the miserable option of attempting to hunt unit 37 the last 2 weeks of September, or looking elsewhere in the state. Once the leftover tags were released, I poured over my options and settled on units 67-69 near Dubois and then spent 4 days in the area during early August exploring some potential spots. While I never saw any bears while scouting, muddy paw prints and large piles of scat warned of their lurking presence.

Scouting complete, plans set, and packing done, I left for Dubois immediately after school on Friday, September 2nd. Saturday morning just at dawn, first light (I waited until I could see to walk just because of the bears) found me stealthily slipping through the timber in search of one of the 5 bull elk loudly serenading the morning. I headed after the closest of the bulls only to be surprised by a rather spooky encounter.

As I tip-toed down a major game trail, I heard a crash to my left and looked over just in time to see two black legs through the deadfall. I immediately knew it was a bear, but with no other context besides two black legs, I thought it was a black bear. I still unholstered my bear spray and stopped and waited. Moments later, at somewhere between 35 and 40 yards, a large, boar grizzly emerged from the other side of the deadfall headed directly towards me on the same trail. Time slowed down.

I have bear identification certification from both the states of Wyoming and Montana and I’ve spent considerable time training with Wyoming Game and Fish personnel over the years to the point that I’ve actually trained quite a number of youths in proper bear safety. Additionally, I have extensive experience camping, hiking, and backpacking in grizzly country. In fact, I’ve spent many nights in tents in the heart of some of Wyoming’s most bear-dense landscapes. Few times have I ever had close encounters and all of my previous encounters resolved naturally without even so much as a second thought.

Interestingly, all of that experience rushed into play as I stood alone facing a large boar grizzly with nothing more than my bow and 3 cans of bear spray (1 remained holstered and the 3rd resided in the depths of my pack) and I felt amazingly calm. Despite the adrenaline coursing through my body, I could hear the training in a well-rehearsed script: Make yourself as large as possible, talk loudly in a strong and calm voice, do not make eye-contact, minimize your appearance as a threat, if needed, spray when bear is within 30 feet (preferably 20 or less) and aim low so spray rolls across ground and right up into its nostrils.

As the boar walked purposefully toward me, I raised my bow over my head, and while waving it back and forth, began forcefully proclaiming, “Hey bear. Hey bear. I’m right here. Hey bear,” all while picking a red line that if he crossed, I would be forced to deploy my spray. At my first movement and vocalizations, he stopped and stood up on his hind legs, standing easily 7+’ tall, an amazing specimen of golden power as muscles rippled beneath his skin. He surveyed me for a moment as I continued waving my bow and repeating my, “Hey bears,” before he dropped to all fours and nearly instantly closed the distance to 20 yards. He did so quickly and effortlessly, and all I had the time to think was, “This is really happening!”

At 20 yards, he stood once again on his hind legs. As a photographer, I’ll admit, I had some of those crazy thoughts where I wished I had my camera instead of my bow or even the spray. He was stunningly beautiful standing in a small patch of sunlight filtering through the forest canopy. What an image I have etched into my memory! He dropped to all fours once again and made no movement, studying me intently as I continued talking and waving. He then lifted his front right paw, making one more forward movement. He wanted to come my direction. He wanted to use the same trail upon which I stood, and I was an inconvenience to his plans. I could see the indecision and reluctance to change course in his body language, but I had nowhere to go. I had no plausible retreat as I had just stepped over some deadfall and could never navigate it going backwards, so I just stood my ground.

Finally, he turned, and while looking over his shoulder watching me, he headed away from me on the same trail, stopping again about 45 yards away to stand and look once more. Moments later, he dropped to all fours and turned right, disappearing into the timber. I watched for at least 5 minutes to be sure he was gone, listening to the same bull elk bugle repeatedly from less than 120 yards away, completely unfazed by my interaction with the bear. It was during that 5 minutes that my right leg beat a nervous rhythm as adrenaline wore off and the reality of such a close call set in. Little did I know that the morning was far from over.

I played with that bull for the next 20 minutes, pulling off a perfect stalk and closing the distance to just 30 yards. I could hear him coming through the timber and was so close I could hear him breathing. All the parts seemed to be coming together. I had a clear shooting lane, the wind was in my favor, and the bull’s line of travel would take him by my position at less than 30 yards. Suddenly he was gone. With no sound at all, that bull simply disappeared. I am convinced the grizzly ruined the stalk as I have no other explanation for what happened. As I pondered the turn of events, ever vigilant to where the grizz might be, another bull bugled up the hill above me. Game on.

Intent upon new prey, I headed uphill. The bull responded each time I bugled, but I did so sparingly so as not to allow him to pinpoint my position. I wanted to be the pursuer, to surprise him in his own living room. Game trails crisscrossed the hillside and I found a large thoroughfare and worked to quickly close the gap between myself and the bull. I’m guessing I was now 300 yards from where I left the last bull when I heard a crash to my right. Praise the Lord for that crash. I’m still thanking Him for that warning and intervention, because as I instantly stopped and looked to my right through a thick clump of brush, I found myself looking once again at the distinct dish-faced outline of a grizzly bear just 20 yards away. I fumbled with my bear spray and managed to get it out, all while watching intently, wondering if this was somehow the same bear, grateful that the light breeze blew steadily from the bear to me. The bear looked into the distance chewing something as I watched and pondered my next move. Suddenly, much to my horror, a smaller head popped up right next to its mother’s front right shoulder and I stepped into my worst nightmare. I was 20 yards from a sow grizzly with at least 1 cub. Now I was in real trouble.

Did I dare move? I certainly couldn’t just stand there as one small stray breeze would carry my scent to her in a moment. Could I slip away unnoticed? Did she have multiple cubs. Would I make it 5 yards before she was on me? I’ve watched videos where sow grizz have confronted perceived threats even when over 100 yards away from their cubs and done so while running 35+ mph. Here I was just 20 yards away.

I consider it fortunate that where I stopped was a pretty steep sidehill. Therefore, while I could see her clearly because she was at my eye level, the only real portion of me that she might have been able to see was my head. I made my decision and slowly bent at the knees, sinking lower and lower until I could no longer see her. Then, in a crouched position, I tiptoed down the hill until I felt comfortable enough to hastily beat a retreat in the opposite direction. Shaken, dismayed, unscathed, grateful, frustrated, demoralized, wondering the wisdom of staying, I spent the next 10 minutes pondering packing up and driving home. Less than 45 minutes into my hunt and I had already encountered 3 grizzlies in very close and dangerous situations. This was NOT fun.

I walked nearly a mile with one hand holding my bow and the other my can of spray with the safety off, slowly allowing my nerves to settle. Above me, I heard a faint bugle and I knew I would stay. I was there to hunt. I was there to pursue my passion. I was an elkaholic!

From: Rickm
17-Dec-20
I am a black bear magnet. Only guy I know that has been bluff charged by a sow with cub, twice.

Fortunately I don't seem to attract grizz! Don't worry about it, just keep a clean camp, 454 in a chest holster and I sleep better with a bear fence when in hump back country.

Drive carefully as it is probably your biggest risk.

17-Dec-20
Patdel, I’d send elkstabber a pm. His name is Curt Lytle. Ask him how his season went this year. He was charged multiple times and called in grizzly while elk hunting.

He’s the real deal. But, his experiences this year gave him real pause.

From: Milhouse
17-Dec-20
Striker...... you're and English Lit teacher, or prof, aren't you?

Riveting account of that hunt and the bear encounters, I felt like I was there. Reminded me of reading Outdoor Life magazine in the 70s and early 80s growing up. They don't write 'em like that anymore.

From: Patdel
17-Dec-20
WV, thanks I will do that.

From: Jaquomo
17-Dec-20
Fantastic story, Striker! Reinforced all the reasons why I don't hunt elk solo in heavy-duty grizzly country!

From: c3
17-Dec-20
I just spent a year in Wyoming in griz country scouting and hunting. I spent a number of days scouting solo right in the thick of it. Two observations from my limited experience.

First is that we only saw four grizzly's in over 40 days we spent in their realm. Also had one big very black bear come in as we were cutting up my elk. Pretty sure it was actually a black bear though. Encounters are actually pretty rare and I never had a close call in any way. I did go looking for a lost wind checker one morning a spooked a grizzly past my two buddies that were quite wide eyed when I came back from searching. It ran down away from me to within 20 yards of them before it turned and ran off as Ken drew his pistol. I never heard or saw a thing which leads to my second point.

Secondly, it is super easy to 'forget' in the heat of the moment where you are and what you could run into at any second. Not being from griz country I, tended to forget about the issue quite often and let my guard down. Both my pistol and my bear spray were on my the waist belt of my pack which I would often have to walk back to to grab my pistol from to do other things.

We had an electric fence around our tent at all times when we were camping. I think I spent 22 nights in a bag on the ground over the last year up in their realm and never had one bear or other critter hit it. Did have two game bags of meat get hit that we left until the next morning 300 yards from the kill site. Definitely don't want to be cutting and packing elk out in the dark in their home terrain.

In the end of the day I think I would do it again solo if I had to. Would probably spend way less time solo in the tent by my self, but still would get after it in a similar way.

Obviously ymmv depending on where you're going, but for some of us it's part of the excitement and reminds you, you're truly alive up until your not. hahahahahahaha !!!

So far it's the alive version for me and mine and wouldn't have traded it for anything on this experience !!!

Cheers, Pete

www.rumble.com/user/c3hammer

18-Dec-20
Some background, Wy sheep area 1, hunting with a recurve for sheep. Spent 1 night @ head of Republic Cr with only sleeping bag in a bunch of rocks by myself. A couple of nights near head of Sunlight on the edge of Yellowstone by myself, piled brush around tent as an early warning system. Had Dave from K-Z pack me into the head of Pilot/Hayden Creeks where I spent several nights by myself, then he packed me onto the top of Hurricane Mesa, surely there weren't any bears there. The next morning in a large snowdrift were a set of grizzly tracks a couple of days old. I piled a bit of brush around the tent. The wind blew so hard I wouldn't have known if a bear had me until I stated to digest. The point of this is that with another person you can be pretty brave, but when that sun goes down and you are by yourself it is a different story. If you hear a rock roll or some brush rustle you couldn't drive a needle up my ass with a sledgehammer. The same goes for walking in the dark by yourself in grizzly country. You probably won't need much toilet paper.

From: Patdel
18-Dec-20
Lol. I hear you and that is about what I was expecting.

From: DonVathome
18-Dec-20
I completely agree with Grey Ghost.

18-Dec-20
As Mike Tyson once said everyone has a plan until they’re punched in the face.

I’ve only hunted a grizzly unit for elk one week so far but I was with experts in this type of elk hunting. These guys have had many encounters with grizzlies and I wouldn’t hunt there if not with them.

The Brown bears I’ve encountered in Alaska run away when they smell or see you. In Grizz units in the west they MAY run away. Different specie.

From: Grey Ghost
18-Dec-20
I'd rather hunt solo in grizzly country than walk thru downtown Chicago by myself.

Matt

From: redquebec
18-Dec-20
I read bowsite and leatherwall with my coffee in the morning. Striker, when I read your post this morning I felt my heart rate and blood pressure rise! Not only did I enjoy the read, I felt like I was experiencing those encounters myself. Thank you.

And BTW I have had black bear encounters and I find them enjoyable...except the one I had with a sow and her cubs. Luckily for me she was cautious and so was I and the whole thing turned into a case of "everyone take a step back". My heart rate and blood pressure were definitely elevated.

From: LINK
18-Dec-20
Saying you don’t remember a grizz attack in the dark is like saying you’ve never heard of a skiing accident in June. In the NM elk unit I hunted this year, most guys were on their quads headed to camp 20 minutes before darkness. I would imagine not many guys hunting grizz country are hiking long in the darkness and hikers certainly aren’t.

From: Patdel
18-Dec-20
Link, that was my first thought too. I got thinking and the Continental Divide Trail goes through some pretty grizzly rich country if I remember right.

Some of those through hikers are out there at night. They have to be.

From: LINK
18-Dec-20
I’m sure but they are probably in a tent and not waking up on bears in the dark.

From: Ron Niziolek
18-Dec-20
Tim Doolin - great story. And muleysareking (Mike Barrett), that was some funny s&$t.

I hunt in griz country every year and have encounters every year. I do not fear them but have a very healthy dose of respect for them.

1. They come to calls, not just cow calls but bugles as well. Set up where you can see 360 degrees. Usually the closer they get, the faster they come.

2. With all of the hiking I've done in the dark - 0 problems. But like Mike said, your ass cheeks will be tight.

3. Once you have an animal down, it's a game changer. This is when most problems happen. If you can get help before you even take up the trail - do it. If that means your dead elk sits for a few hours, no worries. The meat will be fine. If you go it alone, I'd seriously have your gun or spray in your hand. These freaking bears find dead animals quickly. It's amazing and a huge pain in the ass. Once you find your elk, look around and familiarize yourself with how everything looks. And keep doing that every 30-60 seconds until you are done with photos and breaking it down.

4. If your weapon/spray is on your pack, change it so it's on your person. We lost an elk a few years back because three of us got lazy. Our packs were close, but that doesn't work when your pack is off and 10 feet away and a sow and cubs are at 15 yards and closing. Bears don't really care about the number of humans around a carcass. If they want it, they will do their best to take it. We may have eventually lost that elk anyway, but if we had spray/guns on our persons, we'd at last had a fighting chance.

5.One person hold legs, etc. and look around while another does the work.

6. Bears are all different. Some come rushing in huffing and slapping trees and even biting them. That's an effort to scare you out of there. It usually works. When a bear bites a 3 inch log and snaps it, it will intimidate you. Other bears will just walk in without a care in the world. And then some sneak in without a sound. 2017 - I'd shot a bull with my nephew. We watched it drop. We walked over right away and got busy with photos. After photos, we got knives and game bags out to start working on it. My nephew said look at these game bags as he took one out and shook it open. That scared a griz ten yards away. We got lucky. That bear had sneaked in. Close! And that elk hadn't been dead 30 minutes

7. As soon as quarters are off and meat bagged, move them away and stash or hang in a tree. Very difficult if you're alone. If you're alone, I'd suggest just laying them on top of a downed tree or bush. When you come back to get them, you can tell if some are missing or moved.

There's so much more to thing about but those are the ones that come to mind. I'm at work so I'd best get after it.

From: MarkU
18-Dec-20
Interesting to see all the comments about carrying a side arm, when it seems most of the data shows spray works better.

I'm like Stryker, bear spray only. When walking in the dark, I carry a large cannister with a pistol grip, and carry it in my hand at all times. It's about twice the size of the regular cans, and has 15% pepper compared to the 1.5% in the small cans. Also usually walk with the light off if I can see anything at all. During the day, I carry the smaller cannister in my right side pants pocket, no holster, with the handle and trigger exposed.

Two things I learned from getting charged last fall. One, when they say it happens fast, they mean it. Figure you have about two seconds to do something if you're in cover. Two, after the adrenaline rush, you can hike the rest of the day without getting tired.

Go to youtube and listen to Cord Lunds "Grizzly Bear Blues". My camp mates played it for me quite a bit.

From: Bowfreak
18-Dec-20
Listen to the guys who hunt with grizzlies and take their recommendations to the bank.

From: Mule Power
18-Dec-20
After reading the last 2 posts from Ron and Mark I’m out unless I have a partner. If I shoot an elk I’d like 3 people there. The idea is to kill elk AND have fun doing it.

18-Dec-20

Jason Stafford's embedded Photo
Jason Stafford's embedded Photo
Yes, it is best not to hunt in grizz country. It's like Covid you will die ;) Everyone should just stay home locked down........................

From: Kodiak
18-Dec-20
That's a big pile of poo.

From: Live2Hunt
18-Dec-20
I guess my theory on a sidearm is if if happens quick, they are on you. If it's on you and you spray pepper spray your both in it. If, (big if) you are down with that bear on you I would think you would be able to dump a few rounds into it with the sidearm. Ripping off pepper spray that close, not sure. Again, my theory. I have hunted Colorado and Idaho, no grizz. There were rumors of them where we were in Idaho. Now cats? yes they were around and if there was snow you could tell they would follow you more than you think.

18-Dec-20
In all seriousness Ron covered the basics very well. Respect the bears but don't fear them so much that it affects how you hunt. If you hunt grizz country in Wyoming you WILL see grizz.

One thing I would add is to make sure you have an in-reach and it is in a place you can access immediately. I carry mine on the front of my pack. Last spring a local horn hunter was mauled by a grizz. He used the emergency function on his in-reach and was picked up by a medical helicopter barely 20 minutes after being attacked. Not only is it great for an emergency, we use them a lot to reach each other when we get an elk on the ground to help with breaking the animal down and packing. This September by the time my bull kicked his last I had in-reached a friend with horses to pack him out.

Have a plan and make sure someone experienced knows where you are hunting. In September Ron knows where I am more than my wife..........

From: MarkU
18-Dec-20
For perspective, that's Jasons ebike next to the bear turd.

From: SmokedTrout
18-Dec-20
I hunt griz country all the time, frequently solo, and only carry bear spray. A lot of hunting buddies carry sidearms, I've been pondering one but haven't made the leap myself. Seems to me with a gun involved it means someone is going to get hurt, and not always/usually just the bear.

Also I'm not too worried as it seems the griz prefer to attack non-residents.

From: GF
18-Dec-20
There’s a part of me that really wants to believe that the odds of running across the bear are very low, and that you shouldn’t be overly concerned about it. I’m not saying that I wouldn’t pack pepper spray or a side arm or both; fact is I wouldn’t go into Grizz country without at least the spray.

But I can’t forget that study that was done a few years ago where they sent hunters out with GPS units and found that collared bears we’re shadowing those hunters all day long. They know we are a food source, And because they are completely protected, they have no reason to anticipate that we would pose any kind of a threat. And you know, it’s just not that big of a stretch from Food Source to Food Item.

I might hunt alone, but I don’t think I would take up a blood trail without back-up. It would be one thing, I suppose, to stake a claim to your animal and stand guard until your helper(s) show(s) up, but there’s just no effing way that I would consider trying to break down an animal without somebody to watch my 6:00 while I am trying to use a knife that is sharp as I can get it. And my 3:00 and my 9:00 and my 12:00... and all points in between.

I’m sure I would’ve felt differently 25 years ago, but I was younger, stronger and dumber then, and that’s what, 5 or 10 more generations of bears that have been raised under protected status?

Kind of a game changer, IMHO

From: Grey Ghost
18-Dec-20
From Aspen Ghost's link earlier. These stats are for Yellowstone Park per the National Parks Service:

Type of Recreational Activity: Risk of Grizzly Bear Attack

Remain in developed areas, roadsides, and boardwalks: 1 in 59.5 million visits

Camp in roadside campgrounds: 1 in 26.6 million overnight stays

Camp in the backcountry: 1 in 1.7 million overnight stays

Hike in the backcountry: 1 in 232,613 person travel days

All park activities combined: 1 in 2.7 million visits

I'd worry more about stumbling onto an old cantankerous Angus bull in a pasture. Now that's an animal to fear. ;-)

Matt

From: Patdel
18-Dec-20
Grey ghost, that's funny. I dont worry about Angus bulls at all. Or any beef bull really. But show me a Jersey or a Holstein Bull and I will not turn my back on those treacherous critters.

From: Ollie
18-Dec-20
Use some common sense and you should be fine. Carry bear spray on your belt and make sure you know how to use it should the need arise. Use a light when walking trails in the dark. You are far more likely to get killed while driving to your hunt location than by a bear.

From: ryanrc
18-Dec-20
1 in 230k in an area where problem bears probably get dealt with vs a hunter hiking around non-conditioned bears while making elk sounds is not a fair comparison. Also, 1 in 232,000 is far higher than the odds of dying in a car accident I would think. Add into that how many people actually hunt remote grizzly country and then how many of those guys have stories that never get reported. It tells me that the true numbers are pretty grim. Not that I wouldn't do it, but it does give one pause. I did some spring bear baiting in Idaho this year in an area where Grizzlies can be, but not in significant numbers. I talked to enough people and guides to realize that they certainly are around at least a little. Trail cam pics occasionally or just a destroyed bait site. But it sounded unlikely that I would have any issues as one guide told me that his old outfitter boss said they never come in when someone is hunting the bait. Nonetheless, if I had been successful, I might have waited until the morning to process a bear if by myself. From the stories above, it sounds like someone is asking for trouble to butcher an elk solo.

From: Grey Ghost
18-Dec-20
Patdel,

Agreed. beef bulls are usually too fat and lazy to be fearsome. My neighbor had an Angus bull that was the exception. That damn thing tried to kill me every time he saw me. I was so happy when he finally put that mean SOB down.

I don't mean to dismiss taking precautions against bears, especially grizzlies. I just hope you don't let it affect your enjoyment of your hunt.

Matt

From: Rgiesey
18-Dec-20
Everyone in our camp has had encounters with bears. A few shots fired and one bear shot. A lot of experts seem to have a different view than I do. Odds are probably very high that you’d be ok.

18-Dec-20
I've done about a dozen hunts in Grizzly country solo. It's really not that big of a deal. Guys like Noska and Muche do it all the damn time. There's tons of guys in AK, WY, MT, etc, that do it all the time and about one person per year in the entire country dies from a bear and they're often times not solo and not a hunter so there's a ton of guys out there doing this every year and we're not dropping like flies.

Just put a high-powered pistol on your hip and carry bear spray. Go enjoy yourself. Your risk of dying in a car crash is greater than dying from a bear attack.

There's nothing to fear but fear itself. There is some real risk, but it's small. The fear is all in your head.

From: Patdel
18-Dec-20
Yeah Ike, that's kind of where I'm at.

I really appreciate all the input guys. Bowsite is a great resource.

The guy in this thread with probably the most experience hunting elk in griz country even sent me a p.m. with his phone number and an offer to chat. I'm going to take him up on it, listen carefully, follow his advice and go have fun.

From: Ron Niziolek
18-Dec-20
No bs - if you’re a light sleeper in griz country, use Mack’s silicone ear plugs. Beats the hell out of listening to every bump in the night or mouse fart and not sleeping.

From: GF
18-Dec-20
But I think Ike is talking about dealing with bears that get shot at. Lower 48 bears maybe not so much.

But even down here; I don’t think they want any trouble, they just want Food. The trouble comes in when they think you’re trying to take their food from them, and that Elk you just killed? Yeah, that’s not yours. It’s theirs.

As long as you don’t argue that point, you oughtta be OK, right??

From: Owl
19-Dec-20
Do as Idyll, suggests you'll be fine. You'll have a heightened sense of awareness. You'll approach thick brush and blind spots a little differently. Sometimes, you'll move to give your wind rather than take it. You'll speak loudly to yourself when you otherwise would not. Listen to your intuition and be deliberate.

We don't address this often enough, imo, but, as the intimacy of potential threat increases, so should the immediacy of response. Don't be embarrassed to hike in the dark or blood track with your bear spray in your hands or resting your strong hand on the grip of your pistol. Your senses are distracted or reduced. It only makes sense that you compensate for lost response time.

This is only true if you aren't putting yourself at more risk doing so. For instance, you don't want to hand fight your way through a Kodiak Island Alder thicket holding a pistol in your hand just because it could hold an unseen bear. You'll more likely shoot yourself in the head than fend off an attack. That's a scenario where, if you are uncomfortable, you may want to give your wind to the approach or just talk your way through. Commonsense stuff.

The most difficult part of hunting G bear country for an East-of-the-Rockies hunter is finding your way back to it once you've experienced it.

From: Kevin Dill
19-Dec-20
Everything is bigger in the dark.

From: Mule Power
19-Dec-20
Kevin that’s why I ask her to turn the lights off. Lmao

From: LBshooter
19-Dec-20
First of all I want to give credit to those of you who have the stones to hunt heavily invested griz wodds solo,p I don't have the stones to do it.

Secondly, I think your nerves will get you before a griz, the stress with each step has to be intense, make sure to get checked out by a cardiologist before you go lol.

Third, if I were going to griz country I would certainly bring some trip alarms with by 5th ops, they are perimeter alarms that fire a 12 ga blank and a few around my tent about 50 yards away would let me sleep better. You could also put them out before cutting up a elk. Would certainly spoke a bear and give you time to be ready for a charge/attack. they are 3° dollars each but I think money well spent. Good luck if you decide to go and I'm sure you won't end up on the den wall of mr griz lol

From: LBshooter
19-Dec-20

LBshooter's embedded Photo
LBshooter's embedded Photo
Forgot the pic,

From: RK
19-Dec-20

RK's embedded Photo
RK's embedded Photo
LB you could also take three or so of these out to set up on your camp perimeter

From: LBshooter
19-Dec-20
Lol I like. Where do I get them? Lol

From: KSflatlander
19-Dec-20
Great stories and advice. Much respect for anyone hunting in griz county.

20-Dec-20
GF, I've done multiple solo hunts in both Wyoming and Alaska. While I'd definitely think WY bears are a bigger danger, I've been charged in AK a total of two times and in WY zero times and I've seen far, far more bears in WY than I have in AK.

From: Kevin Dill
20-Dec-20

Big boars like the one above are seriously intimidating. I had this guy at 40 yards.... covered with a very pathetic-feeling .44 magnum...as I sat quietly in some willows. Nobody got hurt.

This bear (above) is the one that will get you fast. Her 2 x 2 yr old cubs ran past my camp, followed by the blond sow. She wasn't too happy about the existence of my camp, and was looking pretty agitated. Really covering ground.

Huge blond boar I encountered while backpacking my first load into spike camp from the airstrip. After over-flying the area and seeing nothing of concern, I decided to leave my handgun far below. And of course this bear chose that opportunity to walk my way. I finally bluffed him away, but he showed up in camp mere feet from my tent a few days later.

Very slim chance of having a bad bear encounter. Even in wide open country they can show up dangerously close....and they typically don't provide advance notice.

From: BULELK1
20-Dec-20
When I have hunted 71/73 or 81 elk units in Wyo, I just hunt alert and aware.

I carried my Casul .454 then I went to a Ruger Alaskan .454 shorter barrel than the 10 inch Casul, now I'm using a 9mm as I can draw and shoot it with 1 hand not the 2 hands I needed on the .454's.

I've packed in with my llama pack string and have followed simple guide lines for Bear Aware camp and all has gone well.

I do prefer to get the meat off the mountain with in a day of harvesting though.

To me, it's like anything else in life, the more ya do it the more normal it becomes.

Good luck, Robb

From: Franzen
20-Dec-20
I have no real advice other than to say you probably won't know how it affects you until you do it. I've never hunted core grizz areas, just the fringes. If you can't get some sleep, you probably aren't going to be worth a damn hunting, and that may just be the biggest concern in all of this. If you want to truly go into the "lion's den", where there is no such thing as "if" you will see a bear, there is plenty of 1st hand knowledge from guys who do it regularly above.

From: Elk97
22-Dec-20
My sons and I hunt in thick grizz country every year (MT). I have hunted alone but prefer not to in case I get an elk down, hard to break it down while keeping your head on a swivel. We hiked into a camp the boys set up this year, 5 miles, and about five minutes after dumping our packs off the loudest, scariest roaring started up from what sounded like just behind the lean to (probably 100 yards we figured after our pulse dropped below 200). Turned out that there was an elk carcass back there (hunter was good enough to leave us a note) a couple of bears were fighting over. Didn't take us long to decide we weren't staying so we hiked back out, got to the truck at 1am. You have to be ready to change your plans because of the bears, if there's a bear there you go somewhere else. Always carry a large handgun that you practice a lot with and have it on your belt not your pack, and at least one speedloader in reserve. I also carry spray as a back up (you never know). You get used to it and it becomes second nature, but it takes a few seasons to get comfortable with. As I get older (70) I'd rather hunt where there aren't grizz, especially solo, just less to think about.

From: Bowsiteguy
24-Dec-20
Bulelk1: " I went to a Ruger Alaskan .454 shorter barrel.” I went AND SOLD my Alaskan stubby after missing a crouched mountain lion at 16 feet (eight long steps with my short legs). Admittedly ... I was in a hurry and wanted to make some big noise asap. Admittedly ... I probably aimed between his eyes But two inches is two inches. I replaced it with a Glock 10. More noise and a little time after about seven or eight rounds to settle down.

From: Thornton
24-Dec-20
I read an interesting article about Tia Shoemaker, Phil Shoemaker's daughter and grizzly guide on their outfitting service, Grizzly Skins of Alaska. She said most grizzly bears are curious and their actions are mistaken for aggression. That being said, I would suspect any bear coming to a kill site would be ready for a fight.

From: Ron Niziolek
24-Dec-20
Elk97, I have to agree with relocating if in the vicinity of a carcass. But in NW Wyoming, wherever you pick to relocate has grizzlies as well. There literally aren't any drainages without at least one grizzly.

From: Bowsiteguy
25-Dec-20
Well ... one thing to consider is that Hunting and Fishing has the highest death rate per 100 people of any occupation: almost three times as high as roofers.

From: elkocd
26-Dec-20
https://elkocd.blogspot.com/2020/10/nw-wyoming-general-season-bull.html

From: SBH
26-Dec-20
I've not been to Alaska so I may be wrong but it seems like those bears are different than the grizzlies we have in MT/WY? The Alaskan bears see far fewer people and do seem to be more curious from the posts and videos I've seen. These bears in the lower 48 are grouchy! They deal with a lot more human presence and seem more aggressive. Those of you with experience with both....would you agree or am I off the mark?

From: Bowboy
26-Dec-20
The bears in the lower 48 don't have the food sources the Alaska and Canadian have available. Lot more competition since there's less land for them to roam. Another factor is they have no fear of man in the lower 48 since no hunting is allowed.

26-Dec-20
Bear biologist with USFWS I listened to said the bear density is so high I’m Alaska that running around picking fights leads to bears getting beat up a fair amount. Whereas, the bears in lower 48 don’t have that issue, so they’re more prone to being aggressive.

Just a thought...

From: 70lbdraw
26-Dec-20
My niece goes to school in MT. She and some friends went bowhunting for elk last fall in bear country. They had nothing but their bows. She said they passed a hunter earlier in the day, and couldn't understand why he had a Desert Eagle sized handgun strapped to his chest. Needless to say her father flipped out when she told him. She asked him to send her some bear spray for next time and he bought her a shotgun instead. He used to be a game cop, and has told me some stories.

I'll admit, I'd be too busy freaking myself out, and wouldn't be able to enjoy it... especially at night! We can all learn a valuable lesson from Timothy Treadwell!!

From: Kevin Dill
26-Dec-20
You can chalk it up to human contact. The more human contact any population of bears has, the more familiar they become with humans. Familiarity reduces fear and the instinct to avoid humans. If the bears don’t suffer a negative consequence for initiating contact, the behavior is reinforced. You can find offending grizzlies in Alaska too, though they tend to get shot for things like raiding the chicken coop or chasing someone’s dog. Bear populations which get harassed and shot at regularly tend to wise up and avoid people.

I don’t have any problems sleeping alone in grizzly country like interior Alaska, as long as I know the bears are truly wild. I always keep my food supplies in my shelter. I prepare and eat my food in my shelter, and store the trash in there too. In short, I do everything possible to make it difficult for a bear to overcome their natural curiosity about my camp. I intentionally use my urine to stink up the surrounding bushes. I would certainly NOT do the same things in the lower 48, mainly due to bears which are much more familiar with humans.....and likely to act on impulse.

26-Dec-20
Bear biologist with USFWS I listened to said the bear density is so high I’m Alaska that running around picking fights leads to bears getting beat up a fair amount. Whereas, the bears in lower 48 don’t have that issue, so they’re more prone to being aggressive.

Just a thought...

From: Lefty
26-Dec-20
Ive watched a griz skin an elk,.. accidently walked up on fresh griz kills, had a grizz greet us after coming off a calling location, Watched a grizz go after a moose. Grizzlies scare me. I hunt in grizzly country. I stay close to the road/ camp in the dark. We carry bear spray and my partners carry side arms. Retrieving any game is always shotguns for "sidearms" And often hunt solo,, never in the woods in the morning dark. Never

If coming out in the evening we try to walk in open hillsides. We leave an area if we find anything dead. I try to play it smart

From: Elkpacker1
28-Dec-20
I was in Alaska for a bussiness trip. My client took me fishing on the Keni river using a drift boat. I had to go Poo. I finally convined them to take me ashore. They said we never get outa boat or you may be be Poo. Later I was in a bar/dinner having my dinner. conversations came up about defending yourself from a bear attack. The quite guy spoke and said only one way. Cary a 38 snubby with a leather wrist strap. When the bear jumps on you put up your non shooting arm. the bear will go for it.when bitten sick the 38 in its ear and pull the trigger. No way I said, he pulled up his sleave and said worked 4 times for me. His left arm was a scared mess.

From: MathewsMan
28-Dec-20

MathewsMan's embedded Photo
MathewsMan's embedded Photo
Spring Bear baiting everyone here is seemingly after black bears to eat and they are not wanting brownies on their baits.

I was trying to get my neighbor on a nice black bear but after June 1st when Brown Bear season closed I had a few looks over my shoulder as I would sneak in to toss some bait. He wouldn’t go in there alone after seeing some of these trail cam pictures.

From: bigswivle
29-Dec-20

bigswivle's embedded Photo
You will know it when yall run across me in grizzly country
bigswivle's embedded Photo
You will know it when yall run across me in grizzly country

From: flybyjohn
07-Jan-21

flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
flybyjohn's embedded Photo
I never have carried a sidearm while bow hunting in the past, but last year I had a cinnamon black bear with two cubs charge me to within 4 yards. She came in under some pine bows. I saw the brown and assumed I had jumped some elk out of their beds. I didn't know that I had actually been charged until the sow and cubs ran off and I looked at the tracks in the snow. That is how quickly it happens. I had bear spray but like I said, I didn't even hear it until it was 4 yards away. Not any time to do anything if it was not a bluff.

This last year, I set a tree stand up on water in a different area. There was a little wallow to the right about 75 yards that I didn't see until I had my stand already up in the tree. I put up a game camera on it to see if there was enough activity on that one to reset my stand. The second day up in the stand I kept hearing something splashing in the water through the trees to my right. It was too thick to see anything but after I got done hunting, I got down and went over and checked the camera on that stand. Big old nice grizzly was there as well as several black bears while I was up in the tree. Kept the camera on that hole and it stayed busy for the rest of bow season. During the same day at times, elk, black bear, and grizzly all came into that wallow within about 30 min to one hour of one another. Something knocked my camera off the tree the first day so I reset it and then the grizzly twisted it around during the night. Got a lot of shots of the camera being molested.

I started wondering if it was a good idea to shoot an elk 75 yards from a wallow that has a grizzly and blackbears coming into it several times a day.

From: MathewsMan
07-Jan-21

MathewsMan's embedded Photo
MathewsMan's embedded Photo
Here’s a trail cam closeup of me replenishing my bait and a Brownie hitting it for size comparison.

From: MathewsMan
07-Jan-21

MathewsMan's embedded Photo
MathewsMan's embedded Photo
This is the situation you don’t want to walk into with the undergrowth here that you can only see about 15 yards.

From: Bearshaft
07-Jan-21
HARD PASS

From: MathewsMan
07-Jan-21

MathewsMan's embedded Photo
MathewsMan's embedded Photo
Tried getting my daughter and my neighbor this toad... I only had one stand seat so when I killed my bear it was actually at 7am when we expected this bear for him.

From: MathewsMan
07-Jan-21

MathewsMan's embedded Photo
MathewsMan's embedded Photo
Here’s my view sitting behind my daughter waiting...

From: Brotsky
08-Jan-21

Brotsky's embedded Photo
Brotsky's embedded Photo
I only have about 10 days hunting in grizz country under my belt. This year I plan to almost triple that by year end. A trip to WY and a trip to Kodiak. These guys above have hit on all the key points and guys like Ron are infinitely more experienced than me. I will share the incident I had in bear country that caused me to have the highest pucker factor. We had been seeing grizz sign, tracks and droppings pretty much daily. We were working a bull along a ridgetop through some fairly thick cover when I walked right into the middle of another hunter’s kill sight that had been “disturbed”. I had no idea it was there. If I would have had a lump of coal in my arse Nichole would have had that diamond she’s always asking for right quick. I drew my sidearm and got out of their quickly and with no issue. That could have been a very bad situation had the bear been on that kill when I stumbled on it.

The only piece of advice I have, and this is something I really like, is to wear your spray where you can deploy it in a moment’s notice in the case you surprise a bear or vice versa like in the scenario that happened to me above. I carry a handgun but I also have spray mounted in a holster to the bottom of my bino harness. It can be discharged without removal from the holster very very quickly in case of an “oh chit” moment where you know you can’t get to your handgun. It could also potentially be discharged if a bear has you on your back, etc. Pic attached for reference. This way even if I take my pack off for a minute with my pistol on the belt as well I still have my spray on me.

From: Ron Niziolek
08-Jan-21
Good stuff Justin and nice setup. It can happen so fast and your reaction time can make the difference.

From: MathewsMan
08-Jan-21
I would rethink coming to Kodiak Wish we had gone the year before this one. We have been slammed with snow here 120 miles north of there and last year we had barely seen snow.

Our experience for deer this year was enough to make me look to POW area before returning to Kodiak for deer. The goat hunts are exceptional though.

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