Moultrie Products
Anyone hunt with Hoyt Satori?
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
DiRTY MiKE 02-Jan-21
Phil Magistro 02-Jan-21
Kodiak 02-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 02-Jan-21
Kodiak 02-Jan-21
GF 02-Jan-21
GF 02-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 02-Jan-21
Kodiak 02-Jan-21
GF 02-Jan-21
wyliecoyote 02-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 02-Jan-21
GF 02-Jan-21
Ollie 02-Jan-21
Jaquomo 02-Jan-21
wildwilderness 02-Jan-21
Highlife 02-Jan-21
ESP 02-Jan-21
[email protected] 02-Jan-21
ESP 02-Jan-21
Zbone 02-Jan-21
GF 02-Jan-21
Zbone 02-Jan-21
Bob Hildenbrand 02-Jan-21
Poppy 02-Jan-21
Zbone 02-Jan-21
yooper89 02-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 03-Jan-21
Highlife 03-Jan-21
GF 03-Jan-21
Buglmin 03-Jan-21
Trad PA 03-Jan-21
dizzydctr 03-Jan-21
Mike Castillo 06-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 06-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 10-Jan-21
Chaz 10-Jan-21
Chaz 10-Jan-21
[email protected] 10-Jan-21
GF 10-Jan-21
GF 10-Jan-21
DanJ 13-Jan-21
Droptine 14-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 15-Jan-21
Zbone 16-Jan-21
Poppy 16-Jan-21
Chaz 16-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 17-Jan-21
Poppy 17-Jan-21
Zbone 17-Jan-21
GF 18-Jan-21
Zbone 18-Jan-21
GF 18-Jan-21
DiRTY MiKE 18-Mar-21
nchunter 18-Mar-21
arky 18-Mar-21
GF 18-Mar-21
DiRTY MiKE 26-Mar-21
GF 27-Mar-21
DiRTY MiKE 19-May-21
WV Mountaineer 19-May-21
GF 25-May-21
DiRTY MiKE 07-Jun-21
GF 07-Jun-21
midwest 07-Jun-21
albertguerra3 24-Aug-21
02-Jan-21
I've been looking at the Hoyt satori for a while and I think I'm going to make the jump from compound to recurve here in the next couple days.

****** Disclaimer- yes I know I could ask this question on the leather wall but those guys are special*****

For those of you that shoot the satori what riser length and limb length did you go with?

I currently have a 30.5" draw length with my compound.

There are so many different choices between the 17, 19 and 21 in risers plus the short medium and long limbs.

Watching one of the Fred eichler satori videos he States you should go twice your compound draw length as a minimum. I don't know if I should go with the 19-in riser and the long limbs or the 21-in riser and the medium or long limbs? I would rather have a bow that's pleasant to shoot.

02-Jan-21
Despite your snarky comments about the Leatherwall there are more than a few guys there that shoot Satoris and could easily help you.

Another good source for information is Tradtalk.com. Jim Casto is on both sites and know a lot about Satoris. He has owned several combinations of risers and limbs.

Some of your questions are more generic and not specific to Hoyts. Your draw will likely be between 29 and 30 depending on your shooting style - target or hunting. The choice between riser length is personal but I really like the feel of a 21” riser (not a Hoyt and I shoot medium or short limbs because my draw is only 28”. A 21 with long limbs should give you a very sweet setup.

From: Kodiak
02-Jan-21
Most guys would tell you to get an ILF bow instead, and I'd have to agree.

02-Jan-21
Phil - no disrespect intended .

Thanks for your opinion on riser and limb length.

Kodiak - the satori has ILF limbs. Is that the same as an ILF bow?

From: Kodiak
02-Jan-21
Oops my mistake. Sorry about that.

From: GF
02-Jan-21
The first thought I had when I saw this was “ damn! Starting off in the deep end, huh?“

All of that adjustability is intriguing, but if you have access to someone who can actually put it to good use for you, the primary benefit of ILF is that you’re not locked in with a single manufacturer for limbs. So if cost is any kind of a concern (or even if it isn’t!!) just be aware that it might be many years before you’re good enough to make a convincing argument that a $150 bow is holding you back any....

FWIW, most people shoot better with a longer bow; maybe ILF has changed everything the way that deep sidecuts have changed skis, but last I checked, Target bows were often 72”. You can definitely go shorter in a hunting bow, but of the six on my rack, they run 52”, 60”, 62”, 62”, 62” and 64”.... I’ve done 100% of my hunting with the three 62s. No problems from a tree stand, none on the ground in the northeast and none at home in the Rockies. I bought the short one because I have 2 boys and got a screamin’ deal on a classic at a low draw weight....

The one thing that throws me about the Satori (apart from the fact that the riser alone is more than I have ever paid for a stickbow, including a couple of very desirable Customs) is that it’s a VERY heavy riser, but if you’re used to a compound, you’ll probably never notice that... And at that rate, the long+long that Phil recommended does sound like a sweet shooter. Then if you wanted something a little more maneuverable for hunting you could shorten it up. Because you don’t want to start out with hunting-weight limbs anyway....

FWIW, recommending a bow at twice your compound draw length doesn’t make any sense to me; HALF of your compound draw WEIGHT seems reasonable, though.

But again, ILF.... So no need to drop $350 on your starter set. And lest you be offended by the thought of lightweight limbs for learning with, just be aware that a lot of guys who hunt with with bows in the #50+ bracket also own a lighter bow for practicing their form. And the #1 issue for most people getting started is being overbowed...

I might also suggest that you learn to shoot that recurve with sights first; a peep and a pin with weight you can totally dominate, and you'll figure it out real quick whether you’re missing because of a form issue or something else. And it’s a lot easier to learn how to hit what you’re looking at without sights if your form isn't a major variable from on shot to the next.....

From: GF
02-Jan-21
“ first set of limbs 45-50# should work good.”

Ahhhhh, Nope.

First set of limbs #45-#50 is why most people never get good enough to hunt past 15 yards, so they quit. And if you draw 29”-30”, that #45-#50 will put you a lot a lot closer to #50-#55....

Almost guaranteed Failure if you start out at that poundage... At the very least, you will struggle long and needlessly.

02-Jan-21
Thanks.

I shoot a 70 lb + compound now.

I was planning on buying the #45 limbs. Is that too much to start with? I was planning practicing and hunting with those limbs.

From: Kodiak
02-Jan-21
No, 45# is not too much to start with.

Don't let GF taint your thinking.

From: GF
02-Jan-21
Or you can heed the advice of the full-time professional coach I steered you toward in that PM. I tried to save you that step by telling you what he’s going to tell you, but at least you’re looking at an ILF and you can always go lighter after you’ve gotten tired of missing.

Why do you think so many “trad” guys snapshoot and can only hit stuff inside of 15 yards????

From: wyliecoyote
02-Jan-21
I too have a 30 1/2" DL with my compound w/fingers....28" DL with a release...equals a 28" finger DL with a stickbow. I shoot a Hoyt GameMaster ll stick and have settled on 42# with medium ILF limbs (64" bow)...The GM riser is 21" so it is a 4# add-on to the pinted draw weight on the ILF limbs. I shoot 500 spine carbon arrows. If i was to start over...I would buy 40# limbs for better form and accuracy....FYI: 45 #limbs or more bring out all my inherit shooting faults way to often.

Joe

02-Jan-21
So #35 limbs will feel like a toy and #45 limbs will be over bowed and I'll fail and not hit anything past 15 yards?

The margin for success with traditional archery seems very small.

From: GF
02-Jan-21
I told you in the PM; I’ve seen a lot of guys struggle with #35, including a guy who shot #80 @ 65%...

It just depends on how slowly and painfully you want to learn and what level of (in)competence you’re willing to settle for.

And as Joe pointed out, that last #5 can make a HUGE difference in your accuracy. When you’re learning, the last thing you want to be thinking about is the draw weight; if you set it up right, you should be able to basically change nothing - except for basically tripling your holding weight and learning a clean release off of your fingers. Then you’ll start slapping ‘em in there like you’re used to and then you can remove the sights if you want.

Then if you’re shooting goes to hell, you’ll know that it’s in aiming error and not a form error...

From: Ollie
02-Jan-21
I have never shot a Satori so I cannot comment on that specific bow. Your draw length will almost certainly be shortened with a trad bow. I would guess you will end up with a draw in the neighborhood of 29”. You will want to choose a bow that is optimized for your draw length to get the best efficiency the bow has to offer. With a longer draw length you will likely need a 62” bow to avoid stacking and string pinch. As others have suggested, start with a bow weight that is easy to handle so that you develop good shooting form. Consider starting out with a less-expensive used bow to develop your shooting form and muscle strength and then move on to what you really want. With a little savvy you can sell your used bow for what you paid for it.

From: Jaquomo
02-Jan-21
You use different muscles to draw and hold a trad bow, even a lighter weight, than to "break over" a compound. I've seen way too many high-weight compound converts develop terrible form (and accuracy) habits from overbowing at the start, even just a few pounds. Everybody is different, and where 47# might be great for one, it could be too much for someone else.

One thing that will really help (both strength and for warmup to prevent injuries) is a training aid like a Bowfit. I stretch with a Bowfit every time before hunting or shooting, and for strength during the off-season when I can't shoot outside.

02-Jan-21
Absolutely start with light limbs, especially at your draw length! It’s ILF so you can always get a heavier set when ready. #30-35 is what I recommend to learn!!

From: Highlife
02-Jan-21
There's a reason field archers back in the day used light wt. limbs

From: ESP
02-Jan-21
Dirty Mike. I have on. It is a solid bow. I have 40 lb limbs and a 19”riser long limbs. I also have a 31.5 dL. It comes in at [email protected] This is with the bolts all the way in. I will say that Hoyt limbs really start stacking Around your dL. The satori bow is the only bow that has lasted more than a year with out blowing the limbs. The bow is average speed, need a little work to get quiet. By the design it is accurate.

Pm me if you have any questions.

02-Jan-21
Its not rocket science, good to be getting informed ahead of time. I would get 62" finished length. I would also get something cheaper to start with because its common to have very different view on what is the "right" bow after you get some experience. Satori is a good bow but my advice if you want an ILF is go less expensive at first. There are some very nice lower priced options available. Once you get hooked, you will have a better idea of what weight, length and brand/style you really want.

Yes, lower weight limbs are better to start with and learn form but the muscles you will use build fast if you shoot regularly and soon you would likely be ditching the light limbs. Find a bow in the 40s to try. If its a struggle, go light. If it feels ok and you can draw and anchor for a few seconds without a struggle, you will be fine. My guess is that 40# limbs will be 43# at your draw and 45# limbs will be 48#ish assuming your draw ends up at 29" or a tad over which would be normal. Either is plenty for hunting and higher would be too high for getting started in most cases. Tons of guys hunt with bows in the 40s up to mid 50s, myself included (52# -57#).

From: ESP
02-Jan-21
The satori is rated for a 21” riser. So the weight will be 2lbs more with a 19” and 4 lbs more with the 17”. Hoyt limbs are rated for mid weight. So if you bottom the limbs out you will get approx two more lbs. a 19” riser with long 35 lb limbs will bottom out in the upper 40’s at you dL. Which might be a little much to start out at.

From: Zbone
02-Jan-21
DIRTY Mike - Would say 45# is a good starting point if you're shooting 70# compound...

"the satori has ILF limbs. Is that the same as an ILF bow?"

"ILF" is International Limb Fitting system, meaning if manufacturer correctly, all riser/limb combinations should interchange...

"So no need to drop $350 on your starter set."... Not necessarily, Hoyt is kinda high dollar, so if you wanta get your feet wet to try without a lot of investment, search the bay, there are 19" Chinese knockoff risers similar to the Satori for around a hundred bucks, and you can also pick cheap ILF limbs (especially the lower weights) for under a hundred bucks...

From: GF
02-Jan-21
“ The satori bow is the only bow that has lasted more than a year with out blowing the limbs. ”

What are you DOING to those poor bows??? I can’t recall as I’ve EVER heard of ILF limbs blowing up, so (JMO) there may be an operator-related factor there....

From: Zbone
02-Jan-21

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
DIRTY Mike - I just checked, Satori's risers are $469 and bow $799... If you don't want to pay Hoyt money to get started, here is a couple alternatives... Riser on the left is a Black Bear WARF riser I traded for over on the LeatherWall, with bed custom cut to receive ILF limbs (but it you can find a riser, you can buy plates for the bed to receive ILF limbs)... The Black Bear riser is 21" long, and on the right is a Chinese 17" NIKA duel shelf riser, which you can purchase the whole bow set off the bay with 25 lb. limbs for under a hundred bucks... The whole bow set is made for kids, but any ILF limbs will fit the riser and the light weight limbs would give you a start or training weight... I bought the riser separate without limbs so don't know about them (likely crap), but the riser is cool, and a good solid piece of alloy material for the money I paid for it... Maybe something to think about...

02-Jan-21
ILF...Imminent limb failure:^)

Dirty Mike..start cheaper, and start at 30 - 35#s. Then move on from there.

From: Poppy
02-Jan-21
Buy yourself a one piece cheaper model at about 40 - 45 pounds, something that doesn’t wear you out after a few shots but also doesn’t feel like your shooting a kids bow, if your pulling 70# on compound , you shouldn’t have much problem pulling above weight, and at first concentrate on form and margin for success is not small , but beware, shooting the stick and string is very addicting

From: Zbone
02-Jan-21
There's a "Bear Black Bear Franken bow with sage limbs [email protected]" over on the LeatherWall "January 2021 SWAP and TRADE" thread right now...

From: yooper89
02-Jan-21
I have the 19” riser with 50# limbs and love the bow. My draw is around 29”

03-Jan-21
Thank you for all of the suggestions and opinions. They are all appreciated. I will keep you guys updated.

So I decided I'm going to get a recurve to learn on in the 25-30 lb range and then also buy the satori.

For a hunting bow would you guys go 40, 45, or 50 lb? I'm kind of thinking 45 lb.

From: Highlife
03-Jan-21
Any of those lbs will get it done. Good coc broadhead and your ready to go hunting. Have fun

From: GF
03-Jan-21
If you’re going to go ahead and buy that riser anyway, you’ll probably save some $$ by buying just a lighter pair of limbs, but if you buy a complete bow at that lighter weight, then you’ll have something that friends & kids can learn on.

If I am following the math correctly.... #40 limbs will pick up maybe 10% from being put on the Long riser... and you can add a couple pounds by cranking down the limb bolts.... and your longer DL will add a couple more pounds per inch of draw... so those “#40” limbs could add up to closer to #50 or more off of your fingers....

So you’ll probably want to think that through with somebody who is really familiar with ILF.... and if you do go with long limbs for your practice/form bow (and really no reason not to, at your DL) you MIGHT want to go with shorter limbs for hunting, which could affect what nominal weight limbs you choose. So do the math!

Net #45 is certainly adequate for deer hunting, especially with your longer DL and at typical whitetail hunting distances. A dedicated Elk rig certainly could go higher.

Most of my bows give me #52-#53 at my DL; I also have one at #45, one at #48, and one at about #62. The plan is to shoot the #62 just about enough to know that my first shot with that one is going to be as good as my first with any other (just to save wear & tear) and the lighter two are part of my retirement plan, but I think I’ll be shooting the #48 a lot more this year... Save a little wear & tear...

From: Buglmin
03-Jan-21
There are lots of satori risers that pop up for sale. Guys buy them and decide their not the bow for them and sell them. I shoot 58" and 60" sticks with a 29 1/2" draw with no issues. I'd run a 19" riser with medium limbs, making a 62" bow. The secret to ilf bows is to buy quality limbs, not the cheap ones test will turn you away from stickbows cause of their stacking, slowness, vibrations and just being junk.

Like stared above, the satori riser is heavy. If you can, find one with the wood grip, it just feels better then the plastic one and has a smaller throat in the grip area. Hoyt limbs are decent, not the best, not the worst. They are built bomb proof and can take the abuse.

From: Trad PA
03-Jan-21
21 with medium limbs, the 21 has more mass weight and a larger sight window, both things which could make your shooting more pleasant. Also longer is better for stability and cleaner shooting, especially at your draw. Whatever you do don’t fall into the trad trend of guys recommending embarrassingly low weights because you’re “new” to shooting trad. A 30-35lb bow is laughable for a normal stature and strength grown man. That I’m sure is an unpopular opinion but there’s no reason why most guys can’t pick up 45-50 lb limbs and shoot well even if your sessions are short at first. Lighter is a waste of money and you’ll quickly want a heavier set to hunt with. Start out with what you need.

From: dizzydctr
03-Jan-21

dizzydctr's embedded Photo
dizzydctr's embedded Photo
I treated myself to a Satori with a 21 inch riser and medium length limbs at 55 pounds, and I am very happy with the bow. I got the entry level limbs and they are very smooth with no stacking. I rigged it up in July while I was isolating with Covid. The first shot I took at an animal was this 6x6 bull in Wyoming in September at 26 yards. He fell within sight. Since then I have taken a couple of does here in Alabama. My other recurves and longbows are gathering dust as I seem to shoot this bow better. I hesitated spending the money but would do it again.

06-Jan-21
I am really enjoying my 19" riser satori with short carbon velos limbs...The carbon velos limbs are super nice...not necessary for sure over the stock limbs but are smoother, quieter, and a bit more forgiving...I shoot it with a springy rest and it is excellent.

06-Jan-21
Thanks again.

Trad PA-. Thanks for the advice. I like unpopular opinions.

10-Jan-21
Went to my bow shop / Hoyt dealer and have a tentative order in. Apparently Hoyt might possibly release something new (or not) on Monday so we are going to wait and see.

There were two new choices I have to make after I thought I was all set with the bow decision.

#1. I'm going with Easton axis traditional shafts but which insert? I have four choices the original aluminum hit insert a half outsert or the 50 or 75 grain brass hit insert. So many choices.

#2. Split finger or three fingers under. My man crush fred eichler shoots split but the archery shop is a proponent of three under... Fred is way better looking than the archery shop guy, so I think split is going to win.

From: Chaz
10-Jan-21
If you’re just starting out I highly recommend three Under Fred’s been shooting split finger for 40 years , unless you’re a very young man you don’t have that type of time. Three under is a much easier way to learn getting the arrow close to your eye.

From: Chaz
10-Jan-21
If you’re just starting out I highly recommend three Under Fred’s been shooting split finger for 40 years , unless you’re a very young man you don’t have that type of time. Three under is a much easier way to learn getting the arrow close to your eye.

10-Jan-21
Fred has been shooting split for 40 years but he was a good shot 35 years ago as well. It doesn't take 40 years to figure out. Play with both split and 3 under. You will know which one works. Good news is that it takes about 1/2 a second to switch.

From: GF
10-Jan-21
“It doesn't take 40 years to figure out.”

For the win!

Here’s the difference between the two: 3-Under is considerably easier to pick up because it’s ridiculously easy to make sure that your eyeball is aligned directly above your arrow. If you look from your nock to your target and line up the point of the arrow in between, you’re down to form & tuning as potential causes of a miss.

Shooting split, your nock starts much farther below your eyeball, so it’s harder to be as certain that the nock is on the same vertical line as the pupil of your dominant eyeball, but if you look down the length of your arrow at a vertical line down the middle of the target, then you just need to confirm that the line of the shaft and the line on the target form a straight line.

Just imagine a clock face with the the point of your arrow as the center shaft of the clock; you just need your shaft as the hour hand and the stripe on the target is the minute hand. Keep everything pointing at exactly 6:00, and you’re good to go.

Just be aware that if you choose to shoot split and you check your alignment on each shot, there will be hordes of 3-U “instinctive” shooters standing in line to deride you for being an Aimer/Gapper instead of a truly Righteous “instinctive” shooter like them....

Yes. It IS a load of crap.

And at right about 20 yards, 3-U is typically more accurate because you are close to your point-on distance, where you can float the point of your arrow at about a 6:00 hold .

Split comes into its own at longer distances, but between 15 and 20 or so, it’s difficult to convince yourself to get your bowhand as low as it needs to go. That’s why so many guys shoot over on deer.

From: GF
10-Jan-21

GF's embedded Photo
This shot at 30 came together nicely, because I lined up the shaft of my arrow with the shaft I had stuck in the ground in front of the bull.
GF's embedded Photo
This shot at 30 came together nicely, because I lined up the shaft of my arrow with the shaft I had stuck in the ground in front of the bull.
GF's embedded Photo
Helps if you’re properly tuned. I didn’t have a sacrificial Arrow that day, so I just lined up in between the targets.
GF's embedded Photo
Helps if you’re properly tuned. I didn’t have a sacrificial Arrow that day, so I just lined up in between the targets.

From: DanJ
13-Jan-21
I bought a satori a few years ago for my bighorn hunt (posted a thread awhile ago). It worked out well. Personally, love the mass on the riser as it adds a lot of stability. 19" riser with medium 50# limbs (29 draw) for me (I'm skinny ish 6 footer). Tiller bolts will let you adjust the draw weight a bit and then crank things up as you get into hunting mode. You'll likely be fine with something along the same lines. I sometimes think it would be nice to have some 40# limbs for fun shooting- but having a hard time justifying that. I shot of the shelf for a while but there are accuracy gains to a rest so I shoot it with a NAP Centerrest now.

Arrows - I shoot the Easton Axis trads at full length. Originally shot split but, moved to 3 under. 3 under with full length gives me point on @37ish yds. Started shooting instinctive, had some bad misses. Learned gap. Now shoot a hybrid aiming strategy (instinctive but I'm subconsciously aware of gaps).

I think you could be just as successful with a variety of ILF or similar setups though. Find something that speaks to you. The satori spoke to me.

From: Droptine
14-Jan-21
O shoot as 17” Satori riser with the medium 45lb limbs. Which come close to 50lbs on that riser. Was fortunate enough to kill 2 bucks with it this past season. It’s a great shooting bow I love it and the diversity you can have with it. Don’t get me wrong I still hunt and shoot a lot of my wood bows still but the satori is a great riser.

15-Jan-21
I ordered my first Hoyt bow today.

Shop said it could be 2 to ???? Weeks to get it in.

I can't wait to get it into my hands and shoot it.

Went with buckskin riser and maple limbs.

From: Zbone
16-Jan-21
"buckskin riser" - Like that color but don't see it available on their website... What riser length you end up going with?

From: Poppy
16-Jan-21
Yea, I’m kind of curious about riser length and # to, remember, I told ya in an earlier post, shooting stick and string is addicting!

From: Chaz
16-Jan-21
Matt way to keep it simple lol

17-Jan-21
Hoyt dropped new compound bows and colors on Wednesday. My bow shop already had the new catalog with the new colors.

I listened to my guy at the shop who will be setting up the bow. Any guesses as to what he suggested for riser and limbs?

From: Poppy
17-Jan-21
19” riser with 45lb medium limbs?

From: Zbone
17-Jan-21
I second Poppy's guess...

From: GF
18-Jan-21
I guess it would depend entirely on whether the “shop guy” is a certified coach and how many people he has actually taught how to shoot.

But bigdog’s guess is probably the best bet.

It’ll be interesting to see what spine/length/insert/point he recommended to go with whatever limb.

From: Zbone
18-Jan-21
Me too GF...

From: GF
18-Jan-21
Yeah, well, what do I know, right? I still gap off o’ my knuckles and let it push my shots to the right almost half the time....

18-Mar-21
Day 62. Still waiting.

I called the bow shop this week and they said they never get any notifications on orders. They said stuff usually just shows up.

I was going to hopefully have enough arrows through it to take it hog hunting in mid April but that doesn't look like it's going to happen now.

I wonder if I'll get it before fall deer season rolls around?!

From: nchunter
18-Mar-21
I agree with GF on starting out on a lower poundage. Years ago when I was young and dumb I was talking to Jim Brackenbury about ordering one of his bows. I shot a 70lb compound and thought a 62 pound recurve would be a breeze. Brackenbury begged me not to order this poundage but I did it anyway. I got to where I was decent at 15 yards. I should of gotten a 40 or 45 lb bow. I ended up selling the bow to someone here.

From: arky
18-Mar-21
My buddy just got a Hoyt satori last week and after shooting it for a bit it’s really a nice bow. When I made the switch I went full bore with a 55 lbs bob lee. Wish I would have went with an ilf and cheap light limbs.

From: GF
18-Mar-21

GF's Link
Don’t worry about agreeing with me - that’ll cost you a lotta good will here! LOL

Better you should agree with this guy....

26-Mar-21
My bow shop called to tell me my bow has shipped.

Hopefully next week I'll be shooting my new Hoyt after 70 plus days of waiting.

And next month I'm going to kill a hog with my new bow shooting traditional for the first time ever.

From: GF
27-Mar-21
It’s exciting stuff!

Just maybe don’t set too firm a date for when you’ll be ready to hunt. You’ll get there, but it takes a little while to dial in your tune & your release, etc.

Less than a month is not much time to get up to Hunting Grade proficiency.

19-May-21

DiRTY MiKE 's embedded Photo
Deer at 20 yards.
DiRTY MiKE 's embedded Photo
Deer at 20 yards.
Well it took over seventy days to get the bow. But it is so much fun to shoot. Even if it was a struggle at first (such a struggle)

I went with the 21" riser and long limbs. And shooting three fingers under.

My groups have consistently shrunk over time as I've become more comfortable with the draw weight and getting a good anchor.

I'm learning/ experimenting how to set the brace height consistently.

19-May-21
Looks like you are doing great. Set a goal too, as you have and go for it. It’s what keeps us motivated to improve.

From: GF
25-May-21
3-under will definitely shorten your learning curve, and that long riser/long limb combo probably helps quite a bit with stability.

Looks like you’re picking it up pretty quick. And no reason not to if you’re not overbowed and you don’t get too caught up in the “instinctive” mumbo-jumbo.... which you don’t appear to have done.

And FWIW, if I were you, I would either back up some, or cut down the number of arrows in your groups before this gets expensive! You probably also want to work on random, mixed distances.

Looks like you have room for tennis balls and Judo points.

07-Jun-21

DiRTY MiKE 's embedded Photo
DiRTY MiKE 's embedded Photo
My first cold group of the morning and no flyers. I could not be happier.

How is everybody else's summer practicing going?

From: GF
07-Jun-21
I’ll bet you’re REAL happy that you haven’t dropped your bow-hand! LOL

From: midwest
07-Jun-21
Good shootin', Dirty Mike!

24-Aug-21
Hey guys, new to this forum. I have a question about the satori. I've purchased max6 limbs for it and it shoots super fast, however, top limb jumps up and back. This is shooting my arrows super high. Anybody ever experience something like this? I'm collecting suggestions to try, am new to archery, just started Jan 2021. Thanks for all the help!

  • Sitka Gear