Summit Treestands
Lightening up a dark camp pattern
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Yodameister 12-Jan-21
paul@thefort 12-Jan-21
WV Mountaineer 12-Jan-21
ben 12-Jan-21
trublucolo 12-Jan-21
wytex 13-Jan-21
Bou'bound 13-Jan-21
35-Acre 13-Jan-21
BGbasbhat 13-Jan-21
Yodameister 17-Jan-21
Buffalo1 18-Jan-21
Ollie 18-Jan-21
Scar Finga 18-Jan-21
Medicinemann 18-Jan-21
Medicinemann 18-Jan-21
Jaquomo 18-Jan-21
From: Yodameister
12-Jan-21
Just wondering if anyone ever bought new camo only to realize it was darker than desired and tried altering it rather than returning?

I have had clothing fade over time and wondered if you could speed up the process on a camo pattern that I like but is just a little darker than I’d prefer.

I was also considering adding steaks of gray or tan dye to lighten it as well.

Any ideas?

From: paul@thefort
12-Jan-21
If cotton, wash it many times in hot water/soap. Might help fade the pattern some.

12-Jan-21
I’d send it back.

From: ben
12-Jan-21
I first thought this was going to be about camp lights. You might try making a mild Clorox solution and soaking them in it. It should light up the colors.

From: trublucolo
12-Jan-21
Hang it on a fence if you have a good place to do it, flip it every couple days for a couple of weeks - let mother nature fade it. Did that with a pack to fade it and take the shine off.

From: wytex
13-Jan-21
I've used a spray fabric paint to add some lighter colors to a jacket and hats. Simply Spray makes a soft fabric spray dye . Has lasted pretty well so far.

From: Bou'bound
13-Jan-21
get rid of it if that's an option and get the right thing that will make you happy. I am fine with fixing stuff that is not to my satisfaction or doe not meet my needs if i am passed the point of no return on a replacement option, but why the heck compromise before it is needed.

From: 35-Acre
13-Jan-21
I had a jacket like that once. I thought - Wow! This is too dark! I think it was a mossy oak leaves. I always felt funny wearing it in the woods. One day, I took all of my camo stuff and laid it out on the bank across the road from my camp just to see what it looked like form a distance of 30 yards. I walked back and sat on the porch. the one thing that blended in the best was that jacket. So all that I'm saying is check it's effectiveness before you make a decision on what to do.

From: BGbasbhat
13-Jan-21
At least out west, most camo is too dark. Return it if you can....if not, throw it in with every wash load you do...or sit it out in the sun for a while. Should fade nicely.

From: Yodameister
17-Jan-21
Thanks for the suggestions!

From: Buffalo1
18-Jan-21
Deer see in B&W (shades of gray) not in colors as humans.

Lack of movement is your best camo.

From: Ollie
18-Jan-21
Yep. My experience is that repeated washing to fade the pattern will result in a super shiny garment which is even worse.

From: Scar Finga
18-Jan-21
Tans, greys, browns and greens, I like first lite the best. I still use my Sitka and other stuff, but it's not necessary!

From: Medicinemann
18-Jan-21
Greg (Buffalo1), You might want to research that comment a little further. I believe that deer can see blues and even some greens, not just black and white. It's the longer wavelength light (reds) that they are not able to discern. Kinda makes you wonder if any of the unscented laundry soaps have UV whiteners in them.....

From: Medicinemann
18-Jan-21
Greg (Buffalo1), You might want to research that comment a little further. I believe that deer can see blues and even some greens, not just black and white. It's the longer wavelength light (reds) that they are not able to discern. Kinda makes you wonder if any of the unscented laundry soaps have UV whiteners in them.....

From: Jaquomo
18-Jan-21
I have read blue and yellow. At any rate, back in my poor days I used a spray bottle of bleach with a thin stream to make a pattern. But I wouldn't try it today with a $400 jacket of synthetics

  • Sitka Gear