HuntStand Hunting App
Wild Pork Bacon!
Hogs
Contributors to this thread:
JohnMC 19-Jan-21
midwest 19-Jan-21
midwest 19-Jan-21
butcherboy 19-Jan-21
Drahthaar 19-Jan-21
Pop-r 19-Jan-21
nowheels 19-Jan-21
GVS 20-Jan-21
butcherboy 20-Jan-21
INbowdude 20-Jan-21
19-Jan-21

Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
This was a little pig, so the back straps are tiny...but boy are they good!
Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
This was a little pig, so the back straps are tiny...but boy are they good!
I've been cooking and preparing wild game for over 35 years now, and this year tried something new for the first time- Canadian bacon from a wild hog. It turned out absolutely delicious! It doesn't have that rubbery texture that commercial Canadian bacon has but is much smoother.

Since I had plenty of cure, I decided to play around with a couple of small pieces of fat I trimmed off the back straps and made some small bits of bacon with that. I will never discard another piece of fat off a hog! If you have a smoker you have to try this!!!

-Cheryl

19-Jan-21

Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
They may be small bacon bits, but what they lack in size, they make up in flavor!
Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
They may be small bacon bits, but what they lack in size, they make up in flavor!
I'll be saving all our fat pieces from now on, no matter how small!

From: JohnMC
19-Jan-21
Looks good! Recipe?

From: midwest
19-Jan-21
I can smell it!

From: midwest
19-Jan-21

midwest's Link
I've used this cure from Curley's for all kinds of bacon from domestic pork with great results. Regular pork belly bacon, Canadian bacon, cowboy bacon from pork shoulder. Use the same cure for doing birds and deer shoulders. Great stuff!

From: butcherboy
19-Jan-21
Take the jowls and do the same thing with them. Turns out fantastic!

From: Drahthaar
19-Jan-21
Thanks for sharing. Forrest

From: Pop-r
19-Jan-21
Only problem is there usually isn't much fat on them.

From: nowheels
19-Jan-21
I agree with JohnMC, looks great but please include a recipe!

I’m down to my last 10 lbs or so of pork, so I’m hoping I can add one to the freezer. I’d love to try and add some bacon to the mix.

20-Jan-21
I used the High Mountain Buckboard Bacon Cure and followed the instructions on the amount of cure or pound of meat. I trimmed the back straps of any fat and sinew before rubbing with the cure. I then rubbed the loins with the cure and put them in a plastic container in the fridge for ten days. After ten days, I rinsed the cure off the meat and soaked in water for an hour. After soaking, I rinsed the meat again and them set on a towel to dry. Since the lions were from a very small pig, and only about two inches in diameter, I was cautious about how much smoke I put to them. I put them in the oven first for about 30 minutes at 170, and then transferred to the smoker, which I had previously built a post oak fire in, and cooled down to 200 degrees. It only took about another 30 minutes for the meat to reach 140 degrees, so I had to remove the logs and then let the meat rest in the smoker for another hour. I have two more back straps in the fridge curing, that will be ready this weekend, so I'm going to try and duplicate this and see if it turns out as good as the first ones.

Thanks for the tip on the jowls butcherboy! I think we're gonna need more arrows. :) (to steal a quote)

-Cheryl

From: GVS
20-Jan-21
I do the same thing with venison. turns out great!

From: butcherboy
20-Jan-21
If you want to speed up your curing process, inject the piece of meat you are curing. Let them soak in the leftover brine for 24-36 hours then smoke. You can also invest some money into a small table top vacuum tumbler and really turn out some excellent meat.

From: INbowdude
20-Jan-21
LOL Huntress! Thanks.

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