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Small parcel ban...
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
EmbryOklahoma 20-Feb-21
Scrappy 20-Feb-21
JusPassin 20-Feb-21
LINK 20-Feb-21
EmbryOklahoma 20-Feb-21
EmbryOklahoma 20-Feb-21
TD 20-Feb-21
LINK 20-Feb-21
Bou'bound 20-Feb-21
Aspen Ghost 20-Feb-21
drycreek 20-Feb-21
EmbryOklahoma 20-Feb-21
TD 20-Feb-21
orionsbrother 20-Feb-21
Pat Lefemine 20-Feb-21
IdyllwildArcher 21-Feb-21
DanaC 21-Feb-21
Bou'bound 21-Feb-21
Missouribreaks 21-Feb-21
Rocky D 21-Feb-21
BC 21-Feb-21
20-Feb-21

EmbryOklahoma's Link
I always wondered when/if these urban hunts would get movement towards banning them. Tough to keep a deer from running off of a property you have permission only to have it die on a neighbor that is against it. Looks like Georgia ran into a “Karen”.

From: Scrappy
20-Feb-21
This is a really easy fix. Just have the state legislatures pass right to retrieve like here in iowa.

From: JusPassin
20-Feb-21
Exactly, here if you shoot a deer and it jumps the fence and dies on your neighbors ground you still have the right to go retrieve "your property" which the dead deer has become. You may not take your weapon with you however.

From: LINK
20-Feb-21
I hate to be a Karen but I don’t know that it’s ethical to bowhunt on a property that small, knowing you don’t have permission to retrieve on the neighbors. No different than setting a fence line that you can’t cross. Better be shooting neck shots with a large caliber rifle if you chose to hunt spots like that.

A live deer that you shot on your property is “your deer”? That’s bull butter.

20-Feb-21
Sounds like they are trying to ban anything under a certain acreage... seems they will have plenty of opposition. This could also open up a can of worms for those that want urban hunting banned.

“ The city of Columbus recently discussed implementing a ban on bowhunting for deer hunting in Columbus and Muscogee County on any tract of land that is less than 10 acres. The issue came up for discussion on Feb. 9, and it’s expected to come up for more discussion on Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 5:30 pm. in the Trade Center.”

20-Feb-21
Cory... It would be tough for me to hunt those small acreages too. I guess if you do, you’d better know the neighbors surrounding for a pretty good clip.

From: TD
20-Feb-21
Shoot a rifle on a small semi-urban spot but not a bow???? Around here that would get you into far more trouble than a deer.

Lots of places we hunt are small.... a couple are only maybe 5 acres, but they can be real honey holes. We get to hunt them specifically because we hunt with a bow. We tell land owners they will barely know anyone is there, are great extra security for the property (several places we check water for livestock and walk the fences for them.) We treat it like our own. And if the animals are causing damage, even though the number of animals we take and our success rate may be smaller, the hunting pressure often moves them away or changes their patterns. A backstrap now and then does wonders too.

Most neighbors are good with recovery. (especially if you're sharing...) But about 10% of the population are a-holes. So you will run into a-holes. Personally..... if it becomes a situation I'll tell them no problem, you deal with it then. Have a nice day. And go shoot another. Losing an animal sucks, but things happen.... sometimes people happen... that are out of your control. If you have access and hunting a small place I'm guessing the animals there aren't on the endangered list. Likely just one less that gets hit by a car.

If it's creating a problem with the land owner then we just thank them for the opportunity and go hunt another place. But it's amazing how many land owners know they have an a-hole problem too and want you to deal with their animal problem despite the a-hole. Or even in spite of. It's rare that a-holes practice exclusivity, they are normally equal opportunity a-holes.

I guess they are talking public land? Never dealt with public land that small. Not a bunch of public here anyway and the public land I've dealt with is measured in hundreds of acres, thousands, or even square miles. Not sure what they could do to regulate bowhunting private land?

From: LINK
20-Feb-21
I wasn’t advocating a rifle in an urban area and I don’t really care where you hunt. My only point was if the piece you’re hunting is 80 yards wide and you can’t retrieve on the neighbors, you better drop them in their tracks. I’ve only done that once with archery tackle and I don’t think I could replicate it again. That said if you’re hunting 8 acres it’s likely wooded and your hunting close. A neck shot at a deer from 20 yards or less out of a tree is going to end up with a bullet in the dirt below the animal. Shoot a bullet that fragments and it’s not going anywhere. It would be no different than shooting horizontally with a big hill behind the animal. I’d rather just find a property that allows me a 200 yard retrieve and use my bow.

From: Bou'bound
20-Feb-21
For the landowner who so dislikes a wounded deer being retrieved from their property I can only imagine they would much more dislike 150 pounds of rotting biomass laying in their Rhododendrum’s

They would be much wiser to just say come and get this thing out of my shrubs

From: Aspen Ghost
20-Feb-21
I don't understand why some on here consider someone an "A hole" just because the "A-hole" expects others to respect their property and not presume they are entitled to use it as part of their hunt. Seems like the "Karens" here are the one who feel they are entitled to go on anyone's property because they are somehow special.

From: drycreek
20-Feb-21
Ten acre tracts are so you can whiz in the yard when you take your dog out at night. While I’m not a fan of government restrictions, at least most of them, I can see where even as a hunter I wouldn’t want your wounded deer in my yard hacking up pieces of lung. Of course, that’s the reason I own 80 acres. I can hunt and whiz in the yard !

20-Feb-21
Greg... as quick as I post “Karen”, I rescind that. As I posted above, I’d have a tough time hunting small tracts like that unless I had range to pursue after the shot. Most animals shot through the lungs can easily be off of a 5-10 acre tract (depending on the layout) when on a death run. I agree with your assessment.

From: TD
20-Feb-21
I have no issue with a "no". It's their right to refuse. It's their property. As I said, they can have a nice day. I can always go shoot something else, deer, pig, whatever. But I did offer to deal with the carcass, now they have to. Same folks would likely tell me no to looking for a lost cat or dog, livestock, whatever. Which is their right. I'm a 110% all about private property rights. But having rights is not a get out of A-holeness card. Just means you use oxygen.

They are who they are.... some wear it like a badge. Like I said, it's just 10% or so. And it seems that 10% is more.... memorable.... than the other 90. Sometimes it seems that 10% all live in the same neighborhood..... other places the neighbors would go out and help you recover them. And not an A-hole for miles around.....

My guess is this is a fairly rare occurrence, having to access others property for recovery. I think it's happened a handful times to me in the last 40 years. Last one was a couple years ago, a big ol boar we shot out of a protea farm all of 3 or 4 acres. The whole neighborhood wanted him gone. Offhand I don't recall anyone ever saying no? But then I'm dealing mostly with local folks and not people that just moved in and brought their lil worlds with them. A whole nother topic, but I'm sure some areas of the country can relate..... happens when the city moves in on the country....

20-Feb-21
My Urban Honey Hole isn’t nearly as small, but the owners want us to be very discreet. They do not want some group of lunatic antis protesting or anything.

I’ve had a couple of times where a deer has blazed toward one of the property lines and created some stress and we’ve had some pretty humorous occurrences being stealthy in our departure after a successful hunt... think mob movie meets the trunk of my buddy’s wife’s car.

And then there’s the times that I’ve been quartering and breaking down a deer in the dark in the parking lot at work in the Chicago Metropolitan Area.

Hunting small plots and urban areas has lots of challenges. I wish there was “right to retrieve” here. I wish there was no need to sneak around. I wish I had no concern about someone seeing a deer that I killed, or seeing me breaking it down... I just gotta deal with the Urban Reality when I hunt here.

From: Pat Lefemine
20-Feb-21
I have hunted small tracts in Connecticut and it’s virtually impossible to keep the deer on a 2-acre lot after you shoot them. That doesn’t mean I’m against hunting small parcels, it’s just that bowhunters need to be extremely careful about shot placement and in those situations Hunting over bait is very helpful where legal. It’s best to knock on the neighbor’s doors to let them know you have permission to hunt next door but Tell them how you will be respectful and responsible. You’d be surprised how many will invite you to hunt their ground too.

But I’ve also experienced a Karen, and I gave up one of my urban properties because of it. It happens in the suburbs.

21-Feb-21
I agree with TD 100%. I've hunted a lot of public right on the edge of private in SoCal because that's where the animals are. It is what it is.

That said, there are ways to be discreet and there is shot placement. Slide the arrow right over the heart and they die in 50 yards or less. Keep your shots high % and you can consistently drop them close.

Close shots and no marginal situations. High percentage. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

From: DanaC
21-Feb-21
Land costs vary considerably. Some places you can buy a pretty fair hunt-able piece for what a 1/4 acre building lot would cost close to a major city. (Outside Boston one tenth of an acre might be assessed at $250,000) If you visit some of the 'state' forums (I frequent the MA pages) you'll hear tales of 'suburban' hunting to make you glad you're away from all that. I sure am!

From: Bou'bound
21-Feb-21
any landowner, whether they own 1/4 acre, 1/4 section, or 1/4 of the county has the total right to say no hunting.

To say you can't come drag your dead deer off my front lawn is a different limitation and really is not right. you can see it laying there and what are they going to do with the bloody thing anyway

21-Feb-21
Fence line hunters will be denied the right to retrieve dead game from my properties. They need to use some discretion and common sense to avoid the situation. If they do that, they will be granted permission to retrieve. Property line hunting is not limited to small parcels, it happens on the largest ranches too. Use common sense!

From: Rocky D
21-Feb-21
I live fifteen miles from Columbus and have not heard of any issues. My guess would be that this issue has probably been elevated because of some influential person or a small group of affluent individuals. We are in the Dirty South and we do have our blue bloods!

From: BC
21-Feb-21
Where I live it’s pretty much all suburbs. If we didn’t hunt small properties we wouldn’t hunt at all at home. You have to take special care but it can be done successfully.

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