HuntStand Hunting App
Dogs in Iowa
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
JusPassin 20-Feb-21
Paul@thefort 20-Feb-21
Paul@thefort 20-Feb-21
Woods Walker 20-Feb-21
joehunter 20-Feb-21
ahunter76 20-Feb-21
Rupe 20-Feb-21
Woods Walker 20-Feb-21
Medicinemann 21-Feb-21
Woods Walker 21-Feb-21
skookumjt 21-Feb-21
gobbler 21-Feb-21
GF 21-Feb-21
Drahthaar 21-Feb-21
Woods Walker 21-Feb-21
drycreek 21-Feb-21
Woods Walker 21-Feb-21
From: JusPassin
20-Feb-21
The proposal to allow leashed dogs to trail a wounded deer has moved out of committee and will be going to the floor for debate in Iowa.

From: Paul@thefort
20-Feb-21
addition info froPoints of Interest

Blood Tracking is allowed in 41 states. Blood Tracking is allowed under certain circumstances in one state. This practice is not allowed or has unclear regulations in 8 states. A study conducted in South Carolina found that of the 493 deer that were harvested, almost 20 percent were located thanks to the use of Blood Tracking dogs. West Virginia passed legislation in 2020 that authorized the use of leashed dogs to track mortally wounded deer or bear.

Language The following legislation was successfully passed through their respective legislatures. To increase the chance of pro-tracking dog legislation to pass, the below language may be used as a model when drafting legislation:

Virginia Title 29.1, § 29.1-1516.1: “Tracking dogs maintained and controlled on a lead may be used to find a wounded or dead bear or deer statewide during any archery, muzzleloader, or firearm bear or deer hunting season, or within 24 hours of the end of such season, provided that those who are involved in the retrieval effort have permission to hunt on or to access the land being searched and do not have any weapons in their possession.” Colorado Chapter W-0 Article IV #004: “A leashed dog may be used as an aid in locating and recovering wounded big game wildlife, except for black bears, with the purchase of an annual tracking permit…A dog may only be used to pursue or locate wounded big game during legal big game hunting hours. Provided however, that such pursuit may continue after legal big game hunting hours if the handler contacts and obtains the permission of a Wildlife Officer prior to continuing such pursuit…The dog must be leashed at all times and cannot be used to kill, chase, or harass wildlife.”m states that allow tracking dogs

From: Paul@thefort
20-Feb-21
permit required in Colorado.Colorado

#004 – AIDS IN TAKING WILDLIFE

A. 2. Dogs a. Use of dogs in the taking of wildlife is prohibited except as authorized in Commission Regulations. (See also: §33-4-101.3, C.R.S.) 2. A leashed dog may be used as an aid in locating and recovering wounded big game wildlife, except for black bears, with the purchase of an annual tracking permit. Tracking permits can be purchased for $40.00 from any Colorado Parks and Wildlife Office by the dog handler. Prior to using the permit, the dog handler must notify a Colorado Parks and Wildlife Office and provide the following information: the dog handler’s name, hunter’s name (if different than the handler), hunter’s CID number, location of use, species to recover, and time of use. Within five business days of using the permit, the handler must also notify the Division regarding whether they recovered the carcass. A dog may only be used to pursue or locate wounded big game during legal big game hunting hours. Provided however, that such pursuit may continue after legal big game hunting hours if the handler contacts and obtains the permission of a Wildlife Officer prior to continuing such pursuit. In acting on any such request, the Wildlife Officer shall consider the general public safety and may authorize the dispatch of the wounded animal after legal hunting hours. The dog must be leashed at all times and can not be used to kill, chase, or harass wildlife. The properly licensed hunter is required to be present while the dog is tracking and the animal must be dispatched by the hunter using a legal method of take based on their license. The dog handler is required to wear daylight fluorescent orange or fluorescent pink while tracking, unless the handler is tracking an animal shot on an archery license.

From: Woods Walker
20-Feb-21
It's only a matter of time before they will start putting a microchip in a broadhead so that you can just track the deer with your spyphone. There won't be a WORD said about that.

Wait...I know, just name your dog Galaxy and you're home free!

From: joehunter
20-Feb-21
I am all for it! Nothing better than a picture of smiling human next to a proud pup that just recovered an animal!

From: ahunter76
20-Feb-21
I'm all for it. Just one more "good tool" in recovery.. Woods Walker. Microchip BH won't work for me. I use 3 blade fixed BH on a heavy aluminums shaft. Pass thru into the dirt every time.

From: Rupe
20-Feb-21
Hunters using dogs dates back 1000’s of years. I’m all for it

From: Woods Walker
20-Feb-21
ANYTHING that involves a dog I'm all for. Having a dog in and of itself is a life enhancing experience, but anyone who's ever hunted with a dog realizes another whole level of bonding. Humans and dogs were made for each other.

From: Medicinemann
21-Feb-21
Woods Walker, ....and if you have a pass through....? :)

From: Woods Walker
21-Feb-21
It was a JOKE! Or maybe use a mechanical head then? ;-) (Still a joke...)

From: skookumjt
21-Feb-21
I'm all for being able to use hounds to recover animals. I'm against "hunters" that have poor equipment selection, can't make good shots, and have zero tracking skills. I realize that we all had to start somewhere and we've all had bad shots but it's sickening that in the fall I pretty much every day I see requests for blood hounds. Too often they read like this: "I rushed a 50 yard shot on a great buck in the rain at last light. Not sure where I hit him but I lost blood after three minutes. I need help. Anyone have a blood tracker?". I am afraid to know how often it's happening on does and small bucks that they don't care about and just give up

From: gobbler
21-Feb-21
We just had our first deer and bear season in WV being able to use leashed dogs for tracking wounded animals. It went fine, no major issues or problems occurred . A lot of archery deed and bear were found that would have otherwise been lost

From: GF
21-Feb-21
Seems like a legitimate concern to me, Skooks. I hate to expect the worst of people, but it makes for fewer disappointments and more pleasant surprises when I do.

Anything Good & Beneficial can and will be abused by the X%. Our job is probably to encourage each other to remain in the 1-X% camp.

From: Drahthaar
21-Feb-21
I have been blood tracking deer & bear & pigs for people since the early 70' s , there is no telling how many my dogs have recovered. ( Drahthaar tracking machines ) . Forrest

From: Woods Walker
21-Feb-21
"Woods Walker, ....and if you have a pass through....? :)"

Well....it looks like it's NOT a joke after all! Someone's already come up with it!!

https://pro-tracker.com/product/pro-tracker-recovery-system/

From: drycreek
21-Feb-21

drycreek's embedded Photo
drycreek's embedded Photo
My JRT has found a few deer and several hogs for us. Always worked on a long rope for HIS safety and MY peace of mind. He’s one-eyed now, but that nose is still 100% !

From: Woods Walker
21-Feb-21
I had a setter many years ago who lost an eye, and I believe it made her nose even better! As they say......"That dog CAN hunt!"

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