Moultrie Products
Deer lease questions
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
JohnMC 02-Apr-21
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
Dale06 02-Apr-21
JLeMieux 02-Apr-21
Ok...Russ 02-Apr-21
goyt 02-Apr-21
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
Ok...Russ 02-Apr-21
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
JohnMC 02-Apr-21
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
JohnMC 02-Apr-21
goyt 02-Apr-21
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
Moosemania 02-Apr-21
Thornton 02-Apr-21
JohnMC 02-Apr-21
t-roy 02-Apr-21
Thornton 02-Apr-21
deerslayer 02-Apr-21
Aces11 02-Apr-21
Ollie 02-Apr-21
JLeMieux 02-Apr-21
4nolz@work 03-Apr-21
Lost Arra 03-Apr-21
Kevin Dill 03-Apr-21
Bou'bound 03-Apr-21
Grey Ghost 03-Apr-21
altitude sick 03-Apr-21
Kevin Dill 03-Apr-21
Dakota 03-Apr-21
Bowbender 03-Apr-21
Thornton 03-Apr-21
JLeMieux 03-Apr-21
JSW 03-Apr-21
One Arrow 03-Apr-21
altitude sick 04-Apr-21
Buskill 04-Apr-21
Missouribreaks 04-Apr-21
ki-ke 04-Apr-21
deerslayer 04-Apr-21
altitude sick 04-Apr-21
Kevin Dill 04-Apr-21
RMhunter 04-Apr-21
Bow Crazy 05-Apr-21
From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
As a preface - I hesitate to ask this as I know how quickly a bowsite post can devolve, and cheap shots fly, so to be clear: This question is only for those of you who are familiar with deer leases (i.e. You have leased yourself) not for opinions from the peanut gallery......

How typical is it for the landowner to be able to hunt your lease? I am considering a lease agreement with a new landowner for a prime piece of ground here in Montana - (300 acres of River bottom). However I have some concerns. First is the fact that EHD moved through last year, and I would be leasing it with the realization that I may not kill a buck on the place for a few years. (At this point I am willing to do that in order to lock this place up as an investment for future opportunities). My concern is that the landowner, while not a serious hunter, stated that he wants to be able to shoot a big "monster buck" if he sees it, i.e. from his porch, etc... I have an issue with that as if I am paying a considerable amount for a place, where for the first few years I am basically paying to simply allow QDM to function, possibly not even taking a buck, then he shoots the cream of the crop so to speak, is that a normal situation when leasing a piece of ground? In other words have any of you with leasing experience had this issue before? I would be paying thousands of dollars for a relatively small piece (WELL over $100 per acre) to lease and am not super comfortable with this arrangement, but I am also not sure how normal that is. It may not even be an issue with this landowner (Not sure if he'd even get the chance, and am not sure if he'd actively hunt), but I would be pretty upset to have paid a large volume of money to allow big bucks to grow, only to have him shoot one of them on top of all the money he has received. (I know there's an analogy somewhere, but can't think of a good one off the top of my head.) I may still go through with it, but I feel for the amount I am paying him that is an unreasonable request on his part. If we were talking a thousand per year that would be different, but we're talking top dollar, on a place that has been hit with EHD, and the thought of paying that money for the next 3-5 years and having him pull the rug out on a big buck (or more) just doesn't seem equitable. Also, what is an average to above average price per acre on a good piece of ground? I am sure it varies state to state, but inquiring minds would still like to know. I have not yet signed anything nor given the money over yet. I am planning on meeting with him tomorrow and taking an in-depth look at the property. i have very good sources that have verified it is a stellar piece, but I want my ducks in a row before I take the plunge.

Are there any other pitfalls, landmines, or issues that any of you with experience wish you would have known when you started leasing?

From: JohnMC
02-Apr-21
$30,000 plus seems ridiculous under any circumstances (300 acres x $100). With that said I have done something similar for several years. Three of us have paid $1500 total to guy with a small cabin on 80 acres that also has his home. For the archery elk season. But we are mostly paying for the cabin and access to land locked BLM on one side and BLM on the other side that is not land locked but hard to access the part near his property. He also does some bowhunting we knew that going in and we communicate where everyone will be and some times hunt with him. It worked well. But it is a lot less money than you are talking. For the money you are talking that would make mortgage payment on a $500,000 plus piece of property.

From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
John sorry, my math was way off. Nowhere near that....

From: Dale06
02-Apr-21
I lease land to hunt in Mn, for a tiny fraction of what you’re suggesting. As mentioned, you’re better off buying land than that lease price. He wants to be able to shoot a monster buck if sees one from his porch. That sounds like a rifle shot to me. And I wonder if he would shoot it regardless of lease terms, if you’re not around. It’s your money. I wouldn’t walk away from this, I’d run from it.

From: JLeMieux
02-Apr-21
In your situation, for that kind of money, I would expect sole hunting rights. If the landowner wanted to retain hunting rights of any sort, the price would have to be negotiated down.

From: Ok...Russ
02-Apr-21
Deerslayer, I've been on a lease in CO for elk as well as OK for deer/turkey/hogs. For CO, we just leased the month of Sept for archery season - was an easy sell since the outfitters didn't come in for another month. The owner did not hunt the leased property. Pretty much same with OK - owner didn't hunt the property. Some things to consider: Does the owner hunt? This is good and bad. I've had to request limited access into areas during archery season before 0900 because owner wasn't a hunter thus not really aware of good hunting times. He just wanted to get out, feed cattle and go do other things before too hot. Make sure you have a written agreement along with a liability release letter of some form. Keep in mind the owner could let you pay him for 2 years when not hunting and making improvements then cancel the lease the following year. Try to protect yourself by making friends with the owner and significant other - not be just a business deal. In OK, leases use to run about $10/acre. Not sure what going rate is now but I think I read a listing where asking $20/acre.

From: goyt
02-Apr-21
I hunt in Coshocton County Ohio which is one of the better counties in Ohio. Lease rates by me run about $40/acre for top end hunting ground.

Here are some thoughts for what they are worth. When I am hunting a piece of ground I do not want anyone else screwing up my efforts. If the owner in going on the land both prior to and during the season I would have concerns. Preferably the contract would limit the access to the property to just you and your invitees for a period before and during the season. If the landowner is allowed to hunt it would be best if he is limited to a certain area and the smaller the better. He should not be allowed to let anyone else hunt even if it is his favorite grandson. If he is farming the land his access should be limited to the fields and lanes to farm; no walking around to see how things are going in the woods. Trespassing is always a concern. If he lives on the property he maybe your best line of defense. It would be nice if he had a contractual obligation to take all reasonable steps to stop trespassing. Often ignoring trespassers is the same giving permission. For the price that he is asking it would be nice to have him work with you at least a little on what is being planted in the fields and when they are being cut or plowed. Waste corn or beans can be a great draw unless he plows them under. It sound like you already realize that you should have a long term contract to protect your initial investment until the hunting improves. Make sure that you have a way to break the contract if he does something which significantly damages the hunting such as running ATVs on the property, allowing trespassers or other hunters and trapping. You do not want to find that you are paying over $30,000 a year and he decides to do Halloween hay rides in the woods in October and into November and not have a way out of the contract.

If you do not know the landowner it may make sense to do a little research on him prior to getting into a contract with him. Try to find out what has been happening on the land and in the area during hunting season. Is he a standup guy who would honor both terms and the intent of an agreement.

From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
Again my math was way off. He's asking $4K for 300 acres. To be sure, the top end of what I am comfortable with for that size a piece, but we're talking the Milk River, with Realtree/Bill Jordan type quality. To me that's worth the investment, even with EHD at the moment. I have very good, trust worthy sources that have verified the quality, and I am confident as can be on that end. I am just more concerned that he is going to be taking out a buck or two when I'm not around. I agree with you JLeMieux, and that's a great bargaining point! If he wants that privilege I can't pay top dollar, otherwise it needs to be exclusive hunting rights.

From: Ok...Russ
02-Apr-21
Any chance you have a good enough hunting buddy or two that could split the costs but have same mindset for QDM? 300 acres likely could handle a couple of bowhunters at the same time without messing things up. All depends on layout too but just speaking in general.

From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
Yes, that is what I am currently doing, and they're on board with paying to wait, and money is not a real issue for either of them, but I feel a moral responsibility to make sure that I am negotiating on behalf of their best interest, as well as mine, and that all the i's are dotted and t's are crossed.

From: JohnMC
02-Apr-21
The other way of looking at it is if said nothing about hunting himself he, could take out a buck or two when your not around. He is being honest about what he wants to do that can go into the plus category. I would have a conversation how he is planning on hunting. I would be less worried about him shooting a big buck from his porch as I would be him out there putting a lot of pressure on the deer and either pushing them off the property or them changing their habits because of his hunting tactics.

From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
^^^^ Valid point. Thanks.

From: JohnMC
02-Apr-21
$4000 divided by 3 people is about $1333. Not too bad. Roll the dice this year if it does not meet your expectations don't do it again next year.

From: goyt
02-Apr-21
I agree with JohnMC. Mature bucks are tough to kill and it is unlikely that he will kill over one every few years. This big issue in my mind is keeping people off of the property.

From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
And, to your point goyt, I am thinking if he stands to benefit in that way, he will be more incentivized to the keep people off.

From: Moosemania
02-Apr-21
It's his land so basically if that's his stipulation you either have to go along with it or find somewhere else. If it was me I'd jump all over that lease tho. My experience with that kind of hunter is he's not much of a threat and milk river Montana deer hunting probably isn't easy to come by.

From: Thornton
02-Apr-21
I used to lease two ranches totaling 6,000 acres. I found out one landowner was letting his friends and relatives hunt when I and my hunters were not there. In my home county, this is common practice. Basically, the landowner will tell his buddies they can hunt when the lessors are not there. This covers them from the game warden, but not the lessors if they show up. Where I'm from, the locals hate the nonresidents that have leased up all their hunting land. I believe this is the reason some places have seen an increase in poaching. Cameras do nothing, since most wander around with face masks, and with 1 warden in 2 counties, it is hard for them to answer calls in a timely manner. I will add, you're paying an insane amount of money for a tiny piece of property. 15 years ago, a friend leased 20,000 acres for $60k in norther CO that had antelope, 300 elk, and trophy mule deer all over it. He operated a successful outfitting business on it for the better part of a decade.

From: JohnMC
02-Apr-21
I would love to borrow Thornton's glasses for a day. That way I could see the world through his eyes. I think it would be a site to see.

From: t-roy
02-Apr-21
“The locals hate the nonresidents that have leased up all their hunting land.”

Thornton......How do they feel about the “residents” (such as yourself) doing exactly the same thing?

From: Thornton
02-Apr-21
I could care less who leases something, as long as they dont exclude everyone and act like they own it. I let friends hunt, locals hunted coyotes and one ranch was open to walk in fishing. I don't lease a thing now, and haven't for over a decade. I own a few small properties and have permission on a few thousand acres. I was simply describing what actively goes on in my home county. Some of you get all worked up about it, but it does happen and there is little that can be done about it. Obviously, the wording of the thread owner indicates he is hesitant to spend money on something someone else might be hunting.

From: deerslayer
02-Apr-21
Well, considering I'm a local that thought train matters not. Additionally I believe the county Sheriff's Dept where I am at will not hesitate to deal with trespassers, so I think I'm good there. I am going to have a heart to heart with the land owner and see if we can come to an agreement of some kind.

From: Aces11
02-Apr-21
Maybe it’s implied. I would guess shooting a monster from his porch also includes when he’s driving around in his truck and sees a monster it’s also fair game. Sounds like a sweet chance to lease some great land at a reasonable price. Good luck!

From: Ollie
02-Apr-21
The owner clearly does not understand what “exclusive hunting rights” means. Look elsewhere.

From: JLeMieux
02-Apr-21
deerslayer, since you've updated the price, I would not be as concerned about him shooting a deer. $4k for 300 acres seems like a great deal for somewhere like that. I would sit down with him and just have an honest conversation on exactly what he wants to be able to do and ask if he is ok with establishing some clear cut boundaries on anything outside of that. Giving him that leeway may be just enough to keep him on your side. Assuming his wants aren't ridiculous.

From: 4nolz@work
03-Apr-21
It's his land his terms your decision

From: Lost Arra
03-Apr-21
When any friends or family are allowed to hunt on leased land it rarely turns out well for those paying the lease. One hunter (owner) may work out ok.

From: Kevin Dill
03-Apr-21
If the landowner is shooting deer, he’s hunting. I personally wouldn’t buy into the obvious nonsense about shooting a big one off the porch. He wants to make money from the ‘lease’ (term used very loosely in this case) and still have the right to hunt. I’m not blaming him, as he’s within his rights to set whatever terms he wants. It’s his property.

Eyes wide open. You will very likely not be hunting undisturbed deer, and you won’t really know whether he (or family) are trying to do a little ‘side’ hunting when you are away. This really amounts to paying for access and having no contract (I assume) providing you with sole rights to hunt and recreate on the land. It might work out, but I have plenty of doubts. Your money....his land....and it sounds like plenty of wiggle room.

From: Bou'bound
03-Apr-21
“Giving him that leeway may be just enough to keep him on your side. Assuming his wants aren't ridiculous.”

You do realize “him” and “his” refers to the guy who owns the place right? His wants will be his gets. His leeway will be what he decides to keep.

From: Grey Ghost
03-Apr-21
300 acres of "creek bottom" usually equates to less than 100 acres of bow hunt-able land, in my experience...at least that's how it is around here in eastern Colorado. That may seem like plenty of ground to a midwestern whitetail hunter, but it's a postage stamp by western standards. Any significant increase in hunting pressure could easily blow it up for years. I've seen it happen several times with small properties like this.

Does the owner grow alfalfa, or any other crops, on this property? Does he run livestock on it? Is it visible from a main county road? How well fenced and posted are the boundaries? Those are all questions I'd need answers to before considering a lease.

That said, $13 per acre is expensive compared to the leases we used to sign when I was outfitting. Our standard lease was $2-5 per acre, depending on the quality of the habitat. We had $70-100K per year in leases. It was common for some landowners to retain hunting rights for himself and/or family. In those cases, we simply coordinated with the landowner to avoid any conflicts. If it didn't work out, we'd dump the lease the next year.

It's a shame hunting has evolved to these type discussions, IMO.

Matt

03-Apr-21
Offer him far less for the annual lease. But offer a trophy fee tier system by size. When you kill one you pay more. Incentivizing him to leave the mature deer alone.

From: Kevin Dill
03-Apr-21
Actually the less any landowner knows about the quality of the bucks taken there, the better. I’ve seen properties get crazy popular as soon as someone kills a really big buck.

From: Dakota
03-Apr-21
We have a 400 acre property on a river bottom on the South Dakota/Montana border and EHD is something you're just going to have to deal with. Every several years it comes through. Usually just about the time the bucks are starting to get big and mature from the last episode. It would be a pass for me unless he has some good agricultural crops either on or very close to the property. Especially he's going to be hunting/shooting bucks for himself as well. Doesn't take much to disturb a smaller property like that.

From: Bowbender
03-Apr-21
"The owner clearly does not understand what “exclusive hunting rights” means. Look elsewhere."

I think some on here seem to forget what the term "owner" means. And the fact some are upset that the owner makes lease terms advantagous to himself, ya know the OWNER, is a pretty clear indicator that hunting for whitetails has taken a hard turn in the wrong direction. SMFH...

From: Thornton
03-Apr-21
Not sure if I read this correctly or if some of you guys read it incorrectly, but I think he said $30k a year to hunt it? Sounds like the owner really doesn't want anybody there, but for the right price.... Anyway, $30k a year would buy a nice deer hunting farm about anywhere or several top notch guided hunts on ranches that would certainly have a few Boone and Crockett bucks. My friend leases his 5,000 acres for only $10k a year and they shoot bucks over 170" every year on it.

From: JLeMieux
03-Apr-21
"You do realize “him” and “his” refers to the guy who owns the place right? His wants will be his gets. His leeway will be what he decides to keep." Yeah Bou, I'm aware. I just meant sit down and have a conversation and see where it leads.

Lease contracts and agreements must be different in different areas of the country. I've been leasing property in some form or fashion for 20+ years. Sometimes from individual landowners and timber companies at other times. In all cases, exclusive hunting rights went to the lessee. I know some of you say the owner is the owner and they can do what they want, but that just isn't customary down here. I look at it this way, if you lease a house to someone, they have exclusive "living" rights to that house. The owner still has certain rights and responsibilities to the property, but just can't walk in and crash on the couch. A hunting lease should be no different as long as the contract stipulates that. Here, if the owner wants to retain hunting rights for their own, they discount the lease accordingly, keep an unleased portion for themselves, or become a paying member.

From: JSW
03-Apr-21
Back to your original question. I lease some land and it includes all hunting rights. The landowner has given up any right to hunt it.

Good points were made from both sides. It's possible that the landowner will take better care of it if he has a chance to shoot something "from his front porch". It's also possible that he is hedging his bets for when one of his buddies takes the biggest buck on the property while you are not there. It could go either way.

On the property I lease now, I'm always concerned that the ranch hands, not the ranch owner are keeping an eye out for when we aren't there. For that reason, I try to come and go at all times of the year, especially during the rifle season.

You are going to have to decide if it feels right to you. $10 to $15 an acre is about as low as you are going to find in today's market for decent hunting property. If you don't have a better option, you might as well give it a couple of years and see what happens. I would put in the contract that he has to show you pictures of anything he shoots on the property. You might even want to add some incentives for him to not shoot something big. If you take something over X" you will pay an extra $500-1000. It would be worth it in the long run. Good luck.

From: One Arrow
03-Apr-21
Coming from a person who currently leases their land out...

I have retained hunting rights. Fairly common. However, we have a written contract that states only I can hunt it besides them. There is also an exit in the contract if they or I feel like there is foul play. They do pay less for the lease because I can still hunt it. I could have gotten more and retained hunting rights, but it came down to I just didn’t feel right about it. That’s just me though.

I’ve been offered a lot more by other people, but they want exclusive rights (which I understand) but I don’t want to give up hunting just yet. I hunt maybe 10% of the time I used to... probably less actually.

To sum it up... write it out and make sure you get a signature. You might end up being life-long friends. Don’t forget, it’s his, might have worked his arse off for it or maybe it’s been in the family for generations.

When we decided to lease it out, we had multiple people wanting to lease the property, one guy in particular was a real arrogant ahole. He threw out some large numbers, he told me he didn’t want me in the woods once we signed the contract and he was going to hire someone to plant his foodplots and set up his tree stands. Money isn’t everything so don’t think this guy will just say ok because you don’t want him to hunt. He might just have the desire to go on a couple sits per year. Have the conversation.

Honestly, I’m not sure what “too high” is for a lease anymore. The amount of money some of these guys are spending on leases or purchasing recreational land is mind boggling. I’ve heard anywhere from $12-$35 per acre. I was offered a flat $10k for 3 bow hunters to hunt 3 weeks in November... probably should have jumped on it.

04-Apr-21
Here’s another long boring story to complicate and confuse the topic.

I have two uncles that have lived in South Dakota their entire adult lives. They have always had a group of guys that had a Pheasant hunting camp with various free spots to hunt. My father and I hunted pheasants with that group for $50 per week which was to chip in for food.

Eventually the free spots were leased or went away.

So one of my uncles freind’s that has done well financially bought a farm for our group to hunt. He leased the land back to the farmer to farm. My uncles friend, I’ll call him Bob, could only hunt a few days with us. He had a hunt booked out of country.

The other SD locals returned to work. But my dad, myself and a few of our Michigan friend's returned the next morning to hunt. The farmers son approached us as we pulled up to tell us the daily rate he charges to hunt.

He obviously did not recognize or never saw us from the previous days hunts.

He apparently had been allowing pheasant hunters access while Bob wasn’t there.

We let my uncle know and Bob sold the farm before the next season.

Remote leasing is always a risk. Ask if he minds you putting up cellular cameras so you can keep an eye on your lease.

From: Buskill
04-Apr-21
Now that you have updated the cost I don’t feel it’s all that bad BUT....I would really like to know more about this owner. What is a monster buck to him ? Is he gonna shoot a 110” buck every time he sees one ? Monster means different thing to different people. I know guys that use that term for an 80” 4x4. Also, I’d like to see his barn or house if there’s any way to work that out. If you see he has a deer mount or two in his house and a bunch of racks laying around his barn then you are definitely gonna have competition. If there is a complete absence of trophies then maybe you’ll be ok assuming he’s not letting his brother or son or buddy hunt.

04-Apr-21
I would not be concerned with the harvest of one deer. In reality, they are not "your deer" and can cross onto the neighbors at any time. You are leasing the right to hunt without the general public, and the Milk can be a great region to hunt in. Whatever you choose, best of luck!

From: ki-ke
04-Apr-21
Jeez Thornton...You certainly maintain stiff opinions, even when you haven't understood or taken the time to read and understand the question asked...The OP stated early on that his math was wrong and the cost WASN'T $30k/year. Seems like you just want us to know you have something to say, even thought it's irrelevant to the discussion.

Slayer, sounds like a great deal, although like Kevin said, the owner telling you he wants to kill one giant buck/year is certainly the wild card. Keep the discussion going with him to better understand how much of a threat his terms are to your hunting. One mans "giant buck" is sometimes a 2-1/2 year old 8 pt.

Ask Thornton, he'll know what to do...

From: deerslayer
04-Apr-21
^^ lol!!!

I hear what you’re saying. I am driving down to have a look and the discussion with him right now. I have talked to him enough to know that 100” deer is not what he considers a monster. He grew up on the milk river and knows what a big buck is. He sounds excited to show me some of the sheds and a buck or two off the property. He just bought it this past fall so it hasn’t been in the family for generations. I think he might have stretched himself to purchase the place, and is looking for a way to help offset some of his costs. I think he’s a pretty decent guy, and I think we could probably have a pretty good relationship. I make a living reading people, and I’m pretty convinced this guy is not a serious on hunter in any way, shape, or form. I doubt he owns a bow. I think what he said was what he really meant, if he sees a big giant buck standing in his field he wants the option to shoot it. I can understand that, but at the same time I have to balance that against what is being paid to the hunt the place. At this point, unless something really unforeseen goes down in the conversation, I am thinking I will lease it and try to have a genuine discussion with him about his desire, and get a feel for where he’s coming from regarding that. I am very concerned that the place gets left alone, besides him. The problem is we can’t run cell cameras here in Montana during season, so I would need to rely on him to make sure people aren’t coming in and out. And you guys are right, if he’s not an honest person than I can totally get screwed, but I think I would be able to tell that fairly quickly. He seems to be pretty emphatic about not letting any other people on it, and actually was very blunt to me about not letting people hunt his place to me during our initial conversation, until he let it out that an outfitter was considering leasing it. Once I realized that he would be open to leasing I decided it was worth an option to pursue. With the EHD situation the outfitter backed out, and I am currently in the driver seat. I only live about 45 mins to an hour from the place, so it’s not like I’m some non-resident driving in a few times a year to hunt. I will be on it pretty consistently, and I think we can maintain a pretty good pulse on what’s going on there. And to answer some of the other questions yes, it has Ag on it, I believe hay fields and wheat, surrounded by Ag. A very reliable and good buddy of mine hunted it years ago told me that you definitely lose some deer during season when they wander off the place, but this is the main bedding area. I am going off of the Intel from extremely extremely trustworthy source, and that is why I am willing to try and work this out, because I think it is a super good opportunity, at least at the moment.

04-Apr-21
Being only an hour away makes a big difference for your peace of mind. Good luck, hopefully you come to a mutually beneficial agreement.

From: Kevin Dill
04-Apr-21
The biggest question for me: Is ‘shootin’ a nice buck from the porch’ mostly just talk .... or is it code-speak for ‘There may be a little huntin’ goin’ on here if I decide to’....?

Although it wasn’t a lease, I once was the only bow hunter on a 1400 acre farm in the Kanawha Valley of WV. This place was completely crazy with deer and yet no bow hunter had asked permission. The farm manager wrote me a permit and turned me loose. I killed a mature doe almost immediately, and a couple weeks later in November I drilled a really nice big buck. The manager learned about the kill and asked to see pictures. His eyes bugged out and it was right about then that I sensed I should’ve played it down. The next season there were a half dozen bowhunting permits written there, mainly due to just one buck getting killed a year earlier. I had 2 stands stolen. I still managed to kill 2 deer including a buck, but the word was out. I got out and learned a lesson.

From: RMhunter
04-Apr-21
I would just give it a try. Me and two friends have a 800 acre lease in southern Illinois that we've been hunting for years. The landowner has the main parcel which is 700 acres and then another 100 acres 1/4 mile away. He's always said that we could hunt the 100 acres but he reserved it for the occasion that one of his family members wanted to hunt. It's a great 100 that butts up to a 400 acre track that a well known outfitter has. We've hunted it several times a year for 15+ years and have never saw another soul on it but I think he just wanted to keep a place for a family member to hunt if they wanted. It's always worked out great for us, but the other 700 acres he doesn't allow anyone else except the farmer on the land. Good luck , it sounds like a great property and I bet it'll work out fine. We've became so close with the landowner in our lease that if he had a grandson wanting to hunt that we'd be offering to take them to our stands and help anyway we could.

From: Bow Crazy
05-Apr-21
It sounds like you are on the right path. One thing you will have to overcome is the fact that he will shoot one of the biggest bucks off the property each year. If he is willing to shoot off his porch, he will shoot off his truck, his ATV, etc. If the terrain is fairly open, hilly, it is conducive to long rifle shots. If you can't get over that, don't lease it. BC

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