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What grows after logging a cedar swamp?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
BrotherRaven 12-Apr-21
skookumjt 12-Apr-21
kentuckbowhnter 12-Apr-21
RIT 12-Apr-21
Huntcell 13-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 13-Apr-21
Bow Crazy 13-Apr-21
Huntcell 13-Apr-21
Huntcell 13-Apr-21
Brushpile 13-Apr-21
LKH 13-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 13-Apr-21
Two Feathers 13-Apr-21
Norseman 13-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 13-Apr-21
Norseman 13-Apr-21
LKH 13-Apr-21
bighorn 13-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 13-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 14-Apr-21
Norseman 14-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 14-Apr-21
Norseman 14-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 14-Apr-21
Norseman 14-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 14-Apr-21
RIT 14-Apr-21
BrotherRaven 14-Apr-21
Realwarrior 15-Apr-21
From: BrotherRaven
12-Apr-21
Cant seem to find an answer online so hopefully someone can help. I’m wondering if I cut cedar in pockets what will grow back and if it’s worth it?

From: skookumjt
12-Apr-21
Cedar. Unless you have a deer herd that is anything moderate or above. Then you likely won't get anything.

12-Apr-21
coyote pups fat on deer meat.

From: RIT
12-Apr-21
Little cedars and pioneer species.

From: Huntcell
13-Apr-21
I once read the only place that white cedars in Wisconsin grow from seedlings to trees without fenced protection is Menomonie rez as the deer population is kept low enough for seedings to have a chance to grow.

Outside The Rez tag alders and possibly tamarack trees would grow after removing the large cedars unless the deer population has been reduce to less than 10 per sq mile.

From: BrotherRaven
13-Apr-21
1/4 of my property is cedar swamp and the bedding is so scattered I was wondering what I could do to enhance it in any way. I’m guessing leaving it alone is the best option? Thanks all for the reply’s

From: Bow Crazy
13-Apr-21
I have no experience with this, so this is just a thought. What about more high ground? Hauling in truck loads of dirt where you want the deer to bed. Or during dry periods, scrape up dirt and put where you want for bedding areas? Again, I have no experience with this, could it work?

From: Huntcell
13-Apr-21

Huntcell 's Link
Here is interesting read on the difficulties of maintaining a cedar swamp. Poor regeneration after logging due to resulting site condition changes and failure of seedling regeneration caused by over browse by deer, resulting in few if any seedling survival.

From: Huntcell
13-Apr-21
Cedars can get rather old. From an article of old trees in Wi.

“ In 1997, Larson came to Wisconsin on a research trip from his home in Ontario to look for old trees and take core samples. On that trip, he took a sample from a red cedar, in a part of Brown County called Greenleaf, that his lab estimated to be 1,290 years old.”

From: Brushpile
13-Apr-21
The only place I see cedar regenerate in Wisconsin is in Iron County. The deer migrate out of the snow belt in the winter and the cedar has a chance to grow.

From: LKH
13-Apr-21
Northern MN near Littlefork has a fenced in area where they are working on the cedar issue. I don't have a number but you could contact the MN DNR and maybe get a contact. I know cedar regrowth in that area is an issue. Cedar is a very valuable habitat tree and they would like to have more.

From: BrotherRaven
13-Apr-21
Thanks for the reference. I’ll reach out to them and see what they say. I was thinking about adding some fill but I’m guessing it might be against regulations for filling in wetlands. I’m not sure. Does anyone have experience hunting cedar swamps? I’m guessing if they are already over browsed the deer just pass thru them or only in the winter for thermal cover? I’ve always wanted to just go sit and watch but sneaking in would be hard to do quietly.

From: Two Feathers
13-Apr-21
You can cut one down and your locals will feed on it.

From: Norseman
13-Apr-21
Red, white or Tamarac?

From: BrotherRaven
13-Apr-21
White cedar

From: Norseman
13-Apr-21
If soils are wet most of of the time you could try sticking in some Red willows. Deer love it for cover and winter browse

From: LKH
13-Apr-21
My brother has some huge old cedars in the area I referenced. There is not much growing under them except alder and swamp grass. It's quite wet. His are almost 2 feet across and really gnarly. I'd hate to see them cut down.

How thick/big are yours and how much of your property do they cover?

From: bighorn
13-Apr-21
Tamarack, Spruce, Balsam and Tag Elder. If you have deer they'll keep the cedar chewed off.

From: BrotherRaven
13-Apr-21
About 10 acres or 1/4 of my property. Most between the 4-12” range. It is pretty wet. Does anyone have experience planting Red Osier Dogwood? I would like to try that or maybe willow like mentioned above in the cedar pockets if I decide to cut.

From: BrotherRaven
14-Apr-21
About 10 acres or 1/4 of my property. Most between the 4-12” range. It is pretty wet. Does anyone have experience planting Red Osier Dogwood? I would like to try that or maybe willow like mentioned above in the cedar pockets if I decide to cut.

From: Norseman
14-Apr-21

Norseman 's Link
Willow family are one of the easiest to get started.

https://www.bing.com/search?q=planting+willow+sticks&form=APIPH1&PC=APPL

From: BrotherRaven
14-Apr-21
Thanks Norseman.

From: Norseman
14-Apr-21
I planted 50 hybrid willow sticks ( 1’ long) 2 years ago and they should top 10 feet this summer.

From: BrotherRaven
14-Apr-21
I’m mainly looking for browse. What was your purpose for the willows?

From: Norseman
14-Apr-21
Shelter belt/ screening. I planted them to aid in protection of spruce trees I’m growing inside the belt line

From: BrotherRaven
14-Apr-21
Oh ok

From: RIT
14-Apr-21
Deer hammer my willows. Both hybrid and streamco. The streamco willows are starting year three of growth. I had ground cover but no protection. They sent up hundreds of shoots and are about 5’ tall but bushy. They should out pace the deer this year. The deer have really stunted the hybrid willows also planted with ground cover and no protection. If you want red osier dogwoods you are going to need some protection for at least the first year. After that they should outpace the deer unless you have a crazy density.

From: BrotherRaven
14-Apr-21
I have read people cutting back Red Osier Dogwood to keep the browse in reach of deer. I’m guessing you can do the same with willow?

From: Realwarrior
15-Apr-21
More cedar or down here in Appalachia black locust and cedar. Ic tout don't know what black locust thorns look like, look them up.

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