Mathews Inc.
Alaska to close 60 million acres
Caribou
Contributors to this thread:
Toomanybows Bob 19-Apr-21
[email protected] 19-Apr-21
[email protected] 19-Apr-21
Gil 19-Apr-21
TEmbry 19-Apr-21
IdyllwildArcher 19-Apr-21
altitude sick 19-Apr-21
itshot 19-Apr-21
Bowbender 19-Apr-21
Jaquomo 19-Apr-21
Elkslaya 20-Apr-21
Tilzbow 20-Apr-21
TEmbry 20-Apr-21
Rocky D 20-Apr-21
altitude sick 20-Apr-21
Grey Ghost 20-Apr-21
Lawdy 20-Apr-21
bigswivle 20-Apr-21
Ben 20-Apr-21
Jaquomo 24-Apr-21
trublucolo 24-Apr-21
newfi1946moose 24-Apr-21
Stix 24-Apr-21
Glunker 24-Apr-21
TD 24-Apr-21
WV Mountaineer 24-Apr-21
Stix 24-Apr-21
Lawdy 24-Apr-21
Adventurewriter 24-Apr-21
Ned 24-Apr-21
blacktail 24-Apr-21
drycreek 24-Apr-21
Ambush 24-Apr-21
Adventurewriter 24-Apr-21
altitude sick 25-Apr-21
Lawdy 25-Apr-21
Adventurewriter 25-Apr-21
smarba 25-Apr-21
Adventurewriter 25-Apr-21
Lawdy 26-Apr-21
SmokedTrout 26-Apr-21
Boone 26-Apr-21
smarba 26-Apr-21
keepemsharp 26-Apr-21
Lawdy 26-Apr-21
Realwarrior 27-Apr-21
sticksender 24-Jun-21
19-Apr-21
Alaska is looking at closing 60 million acres to "sport hunting". This means that only "substance hunting will be allowed. You can't claim to be a "meat hunter" and all out of state hunters will be basically shut out. TMBB

19-Apr-21
The Department of the Interior is proposing closing 60 million acres of Alaska federal lands to hunting to all but local subsistence hunters.

The land, in northwest Alaska, is home to the Western Arctic Herd, the largest caribou herd in the state. In 2019, the herd was estimated to include 244,000 animals, down from a high of 490,000 in 2003, but above the 201,000 estimate in 2016.

The proposal would close all federal lands within Game Units 23 and 26A to moose and caribou hunters who aren’t “federally qualified subsistence users” from Aug. 1 through Sept. 30, which covers the nonresident hunting season for the units.

The Western Arctic Herd Working Group said the herd has a harvestable surplus of 10,000 to 14,000 animals. About 10,000-15,000 caribou are harvested from the herd each year by subsistence users from about 40 subsistence-based communities in northwest Alaska. These hunters have bag limits of five caribou per day, with no closed season on bulls and an 8-plus month season on cows. Subsistence users are Alaska residents who live in rural areas within certain boundaries, and are regulated by a Federal Subsistence Board.

Since 2016, nonresident and nonlocal Alaska hunters harvested about 250 animals from the herd, about 2 to 3 percent of the total harvest. Before 2016, they took between 500-800 animals each year.

A public hearing will be held April 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. (AK time) by teleconference. The teleconference number is (877) 918-3011. The Passcode is 8147177

19-Apr-21
THis article was copied off of Google Search,

As with many things in our society, hunters often find themselves defined by certain terminology. We’ve written many pieces here at OL regarding some of the issues surrounding terms like “meat hunter,” “food hunter,” “subsistence hunter,” “sport hunter,” and “trophy hunter.” The main issue with segmenting hunters into different categories like this is that these terms mean different things to different people. It’s no secret that many anti-hunting efforts seek to split hunters by dividing us in a way that makes “trophy hunters” or “sport hunters” the enemies of “food hunters.” The implications of this are wide and nuanced, but they are also very real. Just look to the proposal in Alaska that would potentially close up to 60 million acres of federal public lands to “sport hunters” targeting moose and caribou.

Game Wardens Use Social Media, Tracking Devices, and DNA Evidence to Bust Poachers in California The issue, which is now getting national attention, boils down local subsistence “food” hunters vs. non-local “sport hunters,” or “trophy hunters.” In this case, the federal government differentiates between sport and subsistence hunting by location of residence, not nuanced individual motivations. So even if you are a hunter from the Lower 48, or even here in the town of Fairbanks, who wants to hunt moose or caribou to fill your freezer with meat, you would be prohibited from hunting in this area. You would not be defined as a “subsistence hunter,” even if your main objective was hunting for meat.

Related: The Proposed Closure of Public Land Caribou Hunting Isn’t About Herd Health: It’s About Hunter Conflict

You can oppose this issue by writing a letter to the Department of Interior, but you must do it today or tomorrow. You can email the DOI at [email protected], or write a letter through the Backcountry Hunters & Anglers site here—just make sure to make the comment your own. Or you can call in to the public hearing later this week:

Friday, April 23, 2021 from 5-7 p.m. Alaska Time (or until the end of public participation) Teleconference, toll free: (877) 918-3011 Passcode: 8147177 As I mentioned in the article detailing this issue, the push for this closure isn’t motivated by scientific wildlife management or herd population objectives: it’s rooted in conflict between local and non-local hunters. It’s also about whether or not federal public lands really are public for everyone.

The scary thing about this proposed closure is what it represents, the precedent it could set, and potential future implications for what we call public-land hunting. Although it is a specific issue in a specific place, in a way, this is a battle between those who are identified as food hunters and those who are identified as sport or trophy hunters. Keep in mind that this has nothing to do with the fact that for all hunters in these areas, all meat is required to be salvaged. Many hunters travel to other areas to hunt, and even to target big, mature animals, but those hunters also subsist off of the meat as much as anyone else. There are a lot of Alaska residents (and lower 48 residents) who don’t qualify as subsistence users and are technically “sport” hunters because of where we live, but we eat just as much wild game as anyone living in more remote areas. I believe that this food versus sport/trophy hunting divide in hunters is not only a result of anti-hunters hijacking and defining the terms in an inaccurate, straw-man manner, but it is also propagated by much of the outdoor media industry itself as a way to distance themselves from what the general public might be manipulated to believe is a bad thing.

For example: After explaining the method for measuring a bear skull, one prominent media figure stated recently, “Now you have successfully reduced an awesome animal to a number,” and went on to talk about how it was better to be in the kitchen cooking and sharing the meat from that animal. I certainly don’t find fault in cooking and sharing bear meat. And while I don’t want to assume intent, I do think this statement carries an implication: If you care enough or are even curious enough about “trophy size” to measure an animal you killed, you reduce that animal’s value to just a number. And that’s absurd. It’s possible to both appreciate a remarkable animal’s trophy qualities and enjoy the meat it provides. The two are not mutually exclusive.

Examples and attitudes like this drive the message that if you live in the right place or follow the doctrine of a pure food or subsistence hunter, you are more virtuous, and therefore more entitled to the wild resources than hunters who may want to travel to specifically target the largest animal they can find—regardless of the fact that they may be just as interested in bringing home meat as you are.

Although the particular regulatory avenues for Alaska’s potential closure are complex and somewhat unique to Alaska, the fact that any federal public lands can be closed off from non-local user groups simply because local users don’t want them there should scare all hunters.

Read Next: Wyoming Has a Wilderness Problem

This has already started happening in Alaska and will likely continue. How long until similar things start happening in the Lower 48? Most hunters in destination states can already relate to a resentment of non-local hunters crowding trailheads and backcountry honey holes, even if they’re only fleeting thoughts—right now.

In much of the western United States, where federal public land is touted as a crown jewel of hunting opportunity and access for everyone, hunting pressure and competition seem to be growing issues in many places. Will we soon see hunting on federal lands across the country be restricted to only locals who are deemed qualified? In other words, will all those non-resident elk, antelope, and mule deer hunters from the Midwest, South, and East find themselves unable to hunt federal land in the West? You can already see hints of this in states like Wyoming, where non-resident big game hunters can only access federal wilderness areas if they have a guide, or in Montana where there’s a proposal to set aside more non-resident, big-game tags for outfitters. Both of these issues simply make it more limiting (or at least more expensive) for non-residents to hunt big game on federal public land.

The precedent set by the proposed closure in Alaska, and those closures that could follow, would at the very least serve to further divide hunters based on the food hunting versus sport hunting divide. The result will be lost opportunity for many. If federal public land becomes closed to hunting for the vast majority of Americans, then is it even really public hunting land?

ALASKA HUNTING AND FISHING

From: Gil
19-Apr-21
Alaska is not looking at closing 60 million acres. The Feds are looking at closing 60 million acres in Alaska. Significant difference.

From: TEmbry
19-Apr-21
The state of Alaska is not behind this, in fact the state will be filing a lawsuit against this ruling if it passes similar to the one that just passed last year in Unit 13. In most states I’d argue land is better off in federal hands so it isn’t sold off. In Alaska, federal oversight has done nothing but destroy land access for hunting.

19-Apr-21
There's another thread on this as well. Two actually. The board's meeting is Friday.

19-Apr-21
If these same people get 4 more Supreme Court justices and they make DC a state. Guns first and then hunting will be on their list somewhere.

I know. I’m paranoid. It will never happen here.

From: itshot
19-Apr-21
" It will never happen here. " yup, mad tinfoil hatter if you dare draw parallels between leftist lunacy and its potential failures

From: Bowbender
19-Apr-21
Perhaps one of the Charlie Foxtrot Biden voters can defend this. Or at least try. Amazingly they’ve been awful quiet.

From: Jaquomo
19-Apr-21
Well, I started a thread awhile back about how Haaland would be bad for hunters. Some of our brain-dead liberals disagreed. I TOLD YOU SO.

From: Elkslaya
20-Apr-21
Yes she is very bad for hunters and constitution loving Americans too for that matter.

From: Tilzbow
20-Apr-21
Jaq,

So is Haaland directly responsible for this???

From: TEmbry
20-Apr-21
This already happened once last year up here before she held office. It’s been proposed several times for over a decade now by the same people. Sadly it’s gaining traction in today’s society.

From: Rocky D
20-Apr-21
“ Some of our brain-dead liberals disagreed. I TOLD YOU SO.”

Good call Jaq, our leftist brethren valiantly defended their choice and they felt that they were intellectually superior while doing so! Sadly, their IQ and education doesn’t equal wisdom. Haaland was a toad from the word go and you called it but the left’s vision was obviously clouded by their giddiness over winning the election...

20-Apr-21
I’m reading my Hillsdale collage publication the “Imprimis” and the subject is Critical Race Theory: What it is and how to fight it. By Christopher F. Rufo Please look it up and read it to learn more about what we are really facing. We have bad actors playing the media, academia, Hollywood, politicians but chiefly social media. Russia, George Soros and others can influence and stir up certain groups to keep this movement alive and well. 99% of them are actually useful fools and are being spoon fed the misinformation to bring down the country.

It’s the clif notes on how Carl Marx destroyed capitalism in the countries they used it in. And in the 60s they tried it here. But the lower income class did not rise up and destroy capitalism they used capitalism to move into the middle class and upper class. Ao it didn’t go as planned and how it worked in the USSR, Cuba etc

Well, Marxist are alive and well it’s just that they are now using identity and race to divide the country and are using that for the Marxist revolution. They have been patient and it’s paying off.

Anyone that is concerned for the country, please Look this article up and read it. Hillsdale Collage are not tinfoil hat, conspiracy pushers. But astute historians.

From: Grey Ghost
20-Apr-21
Refresh my memory, Lou, who were the "brain-dead liberals", here, who supported the Halland pick?

Matt

From: Lawdy
20-Apr-21
My village has an area of 37,000 acres. The Feds own almost 15,000 acres of that. Their next CCP will be a killer for our town as they will undoubtedly double their ownership. One thing is certain about the Fish and Wildlife Division, locals have absolutely no voice. I have fought these Communists for over 15 years, proved corruption, testified to that with pictures and video, and gotten nowhere. Until there is another revolution, this is our reality. I predict that as progressives get bolder and bolder, their bloody end will come when their egos and arrogance lead them into actually confiscating guns and taking the land of influential people by eminent domain. That and the people they hurt making their enforcement a risky business. A friend of mine taught school in an Athabanaska village and said that the feds there were very leery. That will spread as government tightens their grip on us. I am old and probably won’t see the explosion, but you younger guys will. It is inevitable.

From: bigswivle
20-Apr-21
They keep poking the bear, not gonna end well for them

From: Ben
20-Apr-21
Guys this is the tip of the ice burg . The proposed 30 x 30 plan is to take over 30% of privately owned land and make it federally owned. I posted on the Kansas state site it is another way to end hunting. Just like this once it becomes federally owned the left will stop hunting on it and it will end hunting as we know it.

From: Jaquomo
24-Apr-21
I've been off-grid. Any results from the Board meeting yesterday.

This is a DOI initiative, and Haaland is Director of DOI, so presumably she is in favor of it. BHA was thrilled with her nomination. Glad to see they are opposing this proposal.

Politics of division are here to stay. We have now been officially split into two camps - "subsistence hunters" (good!) and "sport/trophy hunters" (bad). The media will happily run with this one.

Here's another prediction - hunters who oppose special rights for "subsistence hunters" will be branded as racists.

From: trublucolo
24-Apr-21
"This already happened once last year up here before she held office. It’s been proposed several times for over a decade now by the same people."

She held office in her home state of NM where she has a reputation for riding with those "same people". She was nominated for the position as another "historic first" by the potato head in much the same manner as the mattress back serving as his VP, Gender and race, another social justice warrior aligning with the envirowhacks.

24-Apr-21
Queen Kam and Prince Joe need to read the life story of George III.

From: Stix
24-Apr-21
Well if there's a surplus of 15000 animals and there's. 15000 taken by substitance hunters, then I agree that it is a science based decision. Don't need no horn lovers killing animals there just to say they did or to add mounts to their trophy rooms.

From: Glunker
24-Apr-21
Can I suggest that the Feds promote non-resident hunting in the unit being discussed and donate the meat to locals. By encouraging non-resident hunts locals also get more guiding and outfitting opportunities. That beings more cash to buy more food.

From: TD
24-Apr-21
And folks thought "Demolition Man" was a parody.....

I'm told subsistence hunters only kill the sick and weak......

24-Apr-21
I’m not giving up any part of something I shot in Alaska, to anyone.

From: Stix
24-Apr-21

Stix's Link
You can express opposition to this proposal through the Backcountry Hunters and Anglers portal here:

https://www.backcountryhunters.org/oppose_public_land_closure_in_northwest_ak

From: Lawdy
24-Apr-21
This petition is like the one the feds had concerning trapping on their lands up here. They push these hard in Californistan and other enlightened states. Our state trapping association’s voice meant nothing. They even had letters from overseas and the manager laughed at me when I asked him how the petition went.

24-Apr-21
"Here's another prediction - hunters who oppose special rights for "subsistence hunters" will be branded as racists." As sure as the sun will come up tomorrow and Harris thinks "would you just hurry up and die you old white man I can hardly stand to look at you"

From: Ned
24-Apr-21
looks like the herd needs replenishing and the number of non resident harvests really isn't an issue. why not reduce the subsistence numbers or reduce the cow harvest for a bit.

From: blacktail
24-Apr-21
Adventurewriter, I agree. Just look at Colorado has changed their description of a "Hunting Tag" to purchase of a "Hunting Privilege". Leftist Liberal WOKE Democrats!

From: drycreek
24-Apr-21

drycreek's embedded Photo
drycreek's embedded Photo
Needs no explanation

From: Ambush
24-Apr-21
Well, our federal court just decided that the Colvile Indians in Washington state have a treaty and constitutional right to hunt in BC. Stay tuned for BC's Indians to return the favor to Washington.

24-Apr-21
This is only the start...there are "Indian Lands" EVERYPLACE and this will be a mad dash to take it all back...the second she was chosen I could see the writing on the wall. The useful fools were thrilled she was chosen because of identity politics...merit... ideas... track record...that silly stuff doesn't matter anymore

25-Apr-21
I need to find the website Pocahontas used to prove she is 1/1024th Native American. That is obviously close enough for liberals.

From: Lawdy
25-Apr-21
I am a descendant of Adam and Eve, the first settlers of Earth.. That should cover me hunting on all Fed land.

25-Apr-21
I am actually a little surprised there is not more interest in this thread this could be for the whole ball of hunting...

From: smarba
25-Apr-21
Because hunters don't stick together like antis do. Hunters say/think "I'll never hunt AK, who cares?" or "I'll never trap...hunt lions...hunt bears...who cares?"

25-Apr-21
1000 percent...Ak is out of sight and out of mind...according to some of the that have REAL power its ALL Indian land. Wanna bitch about tags well how about OTC for all native Americans for all till quota filled and then we all can think about the scraps...I just thought about that while I was writing the first line and if I can think of it that easily so can others

From: Lawdy
26-Apr-21
There is Fed land in every state and it is going to increase. Watch what happens as the federal government takes over more and more of America. The Silvio Conti Refuge that borders both NH and Vermont is slated to encompass 7.2 million acres. It will eventually be a swarth of land that goes from the headwaters of the Connecticut River, all the way to the Atlantic, 30 miles on either side of the river. I testified against this and the refuge manager was wild when I pointed this out. We had to use “right to know” in order to obtain their maps they didn’t want the public to see. Ultimately, this refuge will join with the Great Thicket Refuge, Quabbin in Mass, and yields Umbagog in Northern NH and Maine to totally depopulate the North Country. They also have plans to take over the Allagash via National Park. My generation of boomers will be the last generation that will know what freedom is. What it was like to stand and salute our flag as our veteran fathers marched proudly by on the true Memorial Day. Stores closed on Sunday, the Our Father in school, etc. Sadly, we also were the rebels who started the ball rolling towards the mess we see today.

From: SmokedTrout
26-Apr-21
Just wait until the new head of Bureau of Land Management starts getting her fingers on things.

From: Boone
26-Apr-21
So what makes someone a subsistence hunter to be able to use these lands? How do you prove one way your a subsistence hunter and not a trophy hunter?

From: smarba
26-Apr-21
Subsistence is defined by where you live and other criteria (e.g. generally within the unit).

From: keepemsharp
26-Apr-21
The people that defeated the 30 by 30 takeover in SE CO> had to use the freedom of information act to get correspondence that proved lying by Natl. Parks and interior dept. They will NOT tell the truth up front.

From: Lawdy
26-Apr-21
We fought a huge Fed takeover in Rangely, Maine. When I walked into that hearing, the manager was visibly upset. They were planning to ban bear hunting with hounds, snowmobiling, hare hunting with beagles, canoeing wherever one wanted, and atv’s on 225,000 acres. They had lied to the people in that area. We had all the documentation, and 150+ residents were wild, even the greenies over hiking and canoeing restrictions. A multi-millionaire who was a hunter donated a huge amount of money and a pro multiple use conservation outfit joined him and the land is now open and being sustainably logged. We testified at 4 meetings and won, but I am hated by the feds. I try to stay off their land and hunt the big private timberlands and land grants.

From: Realwarrior
27-Apr-21
When this proposal first came to life, I posted it in the Caribou section

From: sticksender
24-Jun-21
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