BlackOvis.com
Mt Goat hunt with Lonesome Dove
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
BowJangles 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
Empty Freezer 10-May-21
Bowboy 10-May-21
midwest 10-May-21
sticksender 10-May-21
Bou'bound 10-May-21
midwest 10-May-21
Potro 10-May-21
Ned mobile 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
Ned mobile 10-May-21
SDHNTR(home) 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
brettpsu 10-May-21
SDHNTR(home) 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
t-roy 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
Beav 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
SteveB 13-May-21
Bou'bound 14-May-21
SBH 14-May-21
BowJangles 18-May-21
Hancock West 19-May-21
BowJangles 19-May-21
Ambush 19-May-21
t-roy 19-May-21
BowJangles 19-May-21
[email protected] 19-May-21
yeager 19-May-21
Ambush 19-May-21
WV Mountaineer 20-May-21
JL 20-May-21
Capra 20-May-21
Jasper 20-May-21
Mad Trapper 20-May-21
BowJangles 25-May-21
Medicinemann 25-May-21
bigswivle 25-May-21
BowJangles 25-May-21
BigSkyHntr 25-May-21
Nick Muche 27-May-21
SDHNTR(home) 28-May-21
BowJangles 29-May-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
caribou77 27-Jun-21
SteveB 27-Jun-21
t-roy 27-Jun-21
WV Mountaineer 27-Jun-21
Mike Ukrainetz 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
Leo17 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
Mike Ukrainetz 27-Jun-21
SDHNTR(home) 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 27-Jun-21
Pop-r 27-Jun-21
BowJangles 12-Sep-21
BowJangles 12-Sep-21
Bowfinatic 12-Sep-21
Bou'bound 12-Sep-21
bigeasygator 12-Sep-21
Medicinemann 12-Sep-21
huntinelk 12-Sep-21
Potro 13-Sep-21
Hancock West 13-Sep-21
t-roy 13-Sep-21
BowJangles 21-Sep-21
bigeasygator 21-Sep-21
Ambush 22-Sep-21
tkjwonta 22-Sep-21
Old hunter 22-Sep-21
boothill 22-Sep-21
Mad Trapper 22-Sep-21
Korey Wolfe 22-Sep-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
Bowboy 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
Treeline 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
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BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
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elkmtngear 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
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BOWNBIRDHNTR 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
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BowJangles 04-Oct-21
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BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
BowJangles 04-Oct-21
SDHNTR(home) 05-Oct-21
kota-man 05-Oct-21
SDHNTR(home) 05-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
SDHNTR(home) 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
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BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
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BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
Mad Trapper 06-Oct-21
deerhunter72 06-Oct-21
boothill 06-Oct-21
iceman 06-Oct-21
Treeline 06-Oct-21
huntinelk 06-Oct-21
t-roy 06-Oct-21
elkmtngear 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
Old hunter 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
Nick Muche 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
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BowJangles 06-Oct-21
BowJangles 06-Oct-21
pav 06-Oct-21
BOWNBIRDHNTR 06-Oct-21
Scott/IL 06-Oct-21
bigeasygator 06-Oct-21
hdaman 06-Oct-21
rooster 06-Oct-21
Bowboy 06-Oct-21
molsonarcher 06-Oct-21
SDHNTR(home) 06-Oct-21
Medicinemann 07-Oct-21
bowhunter24 07-Oct-21
Mad Trapper 07-Oct-21
[email protected] 07-Oct-21
Rut Nut 07-Oct-21
t-roy 07-Oct-21
txhunter58 10-Oct-21
From: BowJangles
10-May-21
I wanted to throw a thread up to keep me accountable for my training progress, hear any feedback or advice from the vets here and just to talk about my hunt. Goat is easily my favorite NA animal and this will be my second time chasing them. My first hunt in BC was unsuccessful due to the animals not cooperating. With a rifle that hunt would have been a slam dunk but it turns out I'm too stubborn to put the bow down.

Training is underway and going really well. I'm down 17lbs and looking to drop ~20 more. The diet is in place and even though the calories are lower than lizard piss I've still got good energy.

For now the stairwell and the treadmill have been getting most of my attention. Wednesday will be my first trek up Old Rag here in VA. I'd like to get 10 up and downs in before I leave for AK.

I'm beyond excited for this one so let's hear some goat hunt stories or see some success photos to keep my motivation going!

Cheers boys,

-Eric

From: BowJangles
10-May-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo
Current diet plan and reps in the stairwell.

From: BowJangles
10-May-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
Current gear list. Any suggestions, advice or words of wisdom are welcome!

Stone Glacier Sky Archer 6400 w/water cover, Kuiu Yukon Rain Gear, Kuiu Guide Jacket, Kuiu Guide Pants, 2 pair, Kuiu Ultra Merino 125 SS shirt, 2, Kuiu Ultra Merino 125 LS shirt, 2, Kuiu Merino Base Layer pants, 3 pair, Kuiu Merino Hoodie (MAYBE), Kuiu Merino Beanie, Kuiu Bino/Rangefinder Harness, First Lite Gloves, Leupold Binos/Rangefinder, Kenetrek Mountain Extreme boots w/extra laces, Kenetrek Liner sock, 3 pair, Kenetrek Alaska over sock, 3 pair, Kenetrek Gaiters, Kifaru 0 Degree Slick Bag, Leukotape Blister kit, Mathews Traverse, 12 arrows w/broadheads, Stan release, Water bottle, Video camera, Anker Battery pack, Chest waders, Wading shoes.

10-May-21
Get ya some Bow. I'm 60 now and workin out towards a hunt is so rewarding for me. One of the things I do is to carry a piece of 3/4" round stock(steel rod) that weighs around 8 lbs on all my hikes. My bow gets heavy at the end of the day. This really helps. Keep Hammerin. Good Luck on your hunt.

From: Bowboy
10-May-21
Good luck on your next goat hunt and keep pushing yourself.

10-May-21
Tie that harness your wearing to a large truck or tractor tire and drag it around behind you. Drag it uphill, down hill, side hill. It builds the legs, lungs and heart. Pick an object ahead, Bush, tree, a fence post and hold your breath while dragging it until you reach that object. Over the summer pick objects further and further away.

There are masks that replicate O2 deprivation. But holding your breath is free.

This is a cheap way to replicate leg burn and Oxygen starvation.

Learn the “Rest Step”

10-May-21
Search “Training Spezial” YouTube

10-May-21
Sorry Eric, search “Training Spezial Christian Stangl “ you tube

From: midwest
10-May-21
Best of luck and have fun!

From: sticksender
10-May-21
Respect to you if you can stick with that diet. One thing to mention is that almond milk has a very high concentration of oxalates, which cause kidney stones. I was a big almond eater until I got a stone a couple years back. Those things can really ruin your day ;-)

Best of luck with your prep program and your hunt!

From: Bou'bound
10-May-21
When you are training and think you've had enough remember this classic about goat hunting:

On a good day of goat hunting you'll be so tired and sore you will be afraid you are going to die. On a tough day of goat hunting you'll be so tired and sore you will be afraid you are not going to die.

From: midwest
10-May-21
There's no workout that could be as brutal as that diet. Damn!

From: Potro
10-May-21
THE HUNT IS HARD, REGARLESS YOUR PREPARATION YOU WILL BE TIRED!!! DENNIS HAS A GREAT OPERATION AND THERE ARE A LOT OF GOAT AND RAIN IN HIS TERRITOTY

10-May-21
Hope you have a good hunt! I am curious about your choice of chest waders and wading boots. I will need something of the like in the future

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
The diet is pretty crappy just because it's so low. I do have a cheat meal once or twice a week depending on energy levels. It's that low because I need to lose muscle as well as fat.

Ned, for chest waders I went with White River and Frogg Togg wading boots. I didn't go "top shelf" since they'll only be used briefly at the beginning and end of the hunt. They met Dennis's approval so they should be good to go.

10-May-21
Thanks!

10-May-21
Of course you’ll get tired. The key difference is your recovery time. You have time to get in good enough shape that you get your breath back quicker and you can get up and out of your bag day after day and get up the hill. Products like hydrate and recover help with lactic acid soreness

From: SDHNTR(home)
10-May-21
I’ve done that hunt with Dennis twice. Yes, physical training is critically important, but mental training is even more important. You cannot physically prepare for being stuck in a spike tent, clinging onto the side of a mountain, in relentless, cold, driving rain. Dennis’ guys will get you UP the mountain, your mental toughness will keep you ON it!

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
How did you fare on your trips, Nate?

From: brettpsu
10-May-21
I'll just echo what Nate said. Be mentally prepared.

From: SDHNTR(home)
10-May-21
My first trip, I only got a chance to get out of the tent for a half day, and I missed! Got my rock landmarks a bit mixed up on my stalk and about stepped on the goat at 6-8 yards. He blew out and when he stopped I had to guess yardage since I was already at full draw, and I shot just over him. Was a brutal 50 yr+ deluge. Hard to imagine rain like that.

On my second trip, the rain pounded again on the first day and I was thinking, no not again! Archery exclusivity was not important to me on this trip. Before I even started I told myself I was coming home with a goat, rifle or bow, but was first going to try with my bow. When the weather broke I found myself at 41 yards again at full draw from a huge B&C Billy. He was quartered to me and I just needed a step. It never came and he blew out of there. He was the only mature goat on our side of the mountain that we could tell. He was too big for me to let him get away. When we caught back up to him several hours later, I shot him with a gun. No regrets. Had great experiences both times, even despite the weather.

Hunted bears with Dennis in 2019 and needed sunscreen. It was downright hot! So be prepared for anything. No bears but my cousin shot a nice Billy.

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
The fact that you got out for half a day and were on goats is impressive! Glad you got a nice goat in the end. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the weather plays nice while I'm in camp.

From: t-roy
10-May-21
“It’s that low because I need to lose muscle as well as fat.”

I’m curious as to why you would need to lose muscle, Eric?

Good luck on your hunt, but as I seem to recall on a few of your recent hunts posted on here, you were tagged out pretty quickly! ;-)

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
If this one goes like the Cougar hunt or the Bison hunt you won't hear a single complaint out of me!

Once upon a time I had a bad habit of bodybuilding. Turns out getting the muscle off is just as hard as putting it on.

I'm currently a lean 250lbs but move much better at 230lbs. That's where I was on my last goat hunt and things felt much better at that weight. Plus it gives me a goal to work toward. I feel like I work better if I have a clear cut goal to try to reach. That being said 230 is the number I've gotta see on the scale. The idea of lugging an extra 20lbs of dead weight up the hill doesn't sit well with me so it's gotta go!

From: Beav
10-May-21
Well it looks like he has plenty of muscle to lose if that is his wish! Good Luck and look forward to following along.

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
Thanks Harlin. Your trophy pics are epic! Very well done man!!

From: SteveB
13-May-21
Will be following along!

From: Bou'bound
14-May-21

Bou'bound's Link
I found this to be inspirational and some great things to apply to time on the mountain and pushing through. it's worth the 18 minutes.

From: SBH
14-May-21
You need to add beer to that diet. It's good for you. Promise.

From: BowJangles
18-May-21
@Bou, that Ted Talk scared me! The amount of mental durability you have to have to do up-downs on EVEREST day after day is near superhuman, never mind the physical ability. Yowzers!

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
I was there in the spring of 2011 at 50 Years old. Most of my team dropped one by one due to various health issues, extreme dry cough causing breathing issues from the very dry air. Also gastrointestinal bugs took some out. And physical injuries. A guy on our team passed away on the Lhotse Face. We had to take him back to camp 2 where his wife arranged for his removal in a helicopter. He laid wrapped in his sleeping bag for 2 days. Before the climb you have to check a box on what is to be done with your Carcass. I didn’t the money so checked the box to throw me in a crevasse. It was $3000 to take you lower and burn your body. As she mentioned the most dangerous place on the mountain is the Khumbu Icefall. It’s where most people are killed. The worst for me was the 6 day bout with diarrhea from a bug. Barley getting all my clothes off every ten minutes to spray the mountain. Then the occasional Cheyne Stokes Breathing at night. And the terrible headaches. What really I did not like is that the Icefall doctors and Sherpa do all the work. Setting ladders and the route. Carrying and setting tents. It’s not real climbing. It’s a tourist trap. She mentions Acclimatization. Going up and down. And that is how the expeditions do it. But many lone climbers leave base camp, summit and Return to base camp in one trip. It’s the latest thing. Speed climbing. I was there 5 weeks. Many now climb it in a day.

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Heading to camp 2
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Heading to camp 2

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp 3
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp 3

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp four and as high as I made it.
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp four and as high as I made it.

19-May-21
Eric, I doubt you have issues with mental toughness. Body building takes serious discipline and mental toughness. You’ll be fine.

From: Hancock West
19-May-21
Jay, how did the guy in your group pass away? was it the icefalls? wow. not sure i'd be cut out for this hunt

19-May-21
Matt, We think He had a sudden heart attack with no symptoms on the Lohtse face which is a steep 3000 foot wall of ice. I thought I was having a heart attack all the way up it.

A Sherpa Went back down to camp 2. got some adrenaline came back up and he was given adrenaline with CPR but it did not work. He seemed very healthy.

From: BowJangles
19-May-21
Holy hell Jay! You climbed Everest!! That's beyond bad ass.

From: Ambush
19-May-21
Eric, you're already more prepared than about ninety five percent of goat hunters are when they look up from the bottom. Prove it when you get there and the guides will be be willing to you where they wouldn't take ninety five percent of the other hunters. And that's where the monster Billy's live and die!!

I firmly believe that archery goat is the most attainable new WR.

19-May-21
My permit was only good to camp 4 that was my goal and as high as I could afford To go. Nepal charges a permit fee for each camp height on Everest. Most other peaks over there are empty and minimal permit fee. As I said Everest is a tourist trap.

From: t-roy
19-May-21
What was the elevation at Camp 4, Jay?

19-May-21
That year just over 26k

From: BowJangles
19-May-21
Rod, I was thinking that most folks go into this hunt with no training experience whatsoever. I see that as a leg up for myself. I'm hoping that the special kind of stubbornness I had when I willingly starving myself for shows and pushing myself for the last 4 weeks of a prep when I had literally no energy will be the same kind of stubbornness I have on the mountain.

19-May-21

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Get knee sleeves, you will thank me. They will keep the knees warmer and help hold the knee parts together especially when climbing or descending.

From: yeager
19-May-21
Good luck with you training and goat hunt..........remember, “the easy day was yesterday”!

From: Ambush
19-May-21
Pay no attention to Paul. I'm pretty sure he's Bionic.

20-May-21
Eric, I have the feeling You will be more prepared than 99.99% of the other hunters they get.

I agree with Ambush. That means they will be excited to get a client that can finally get to that spot where they think an 11” Goat is.

20-May-21
I do t know you or your body. I’m just saying that’s a light calorie regimen while being active. Watch for injuries

From: JL
20-May-21

JL's embedded Photo
JL's embedded Photo
I have a lot of respect for folks who can stick with a goat exercise plan. Numerous times I had to drop a lot of weight real fast for work. IME....you have to get your mind right in order to be successful. Once you do it the first time....the next times are fairly easy mentally.

Speaking of the Mt Everest thing being a tourist trap....I remember this photo being in the news a few years ago showing the crowded pathway going up. I give folks alot of credit for attempting the climb.....I could not do it these days.

From: Capra
20-May-21
I own a DEXA scanning company and see a lot of people with diet and exercise goals.

You are a big guy and I presume that you have your workouts as dialed in as your diet. I read that you are trying to cut 20 lbs. That should be no big deal BUT in my opinion you need more calories if you use your workout as your deficit you will have the same results or better than running a calorie deficit and workout deficit.

My data set is a cross section of people all with the similar goal and it is surprising who wins the challenges. It is always the people who have a balanced system not the cutters.

Get the hamskea 3rd axis leveler and practice steep shots if you can. GOOD LUCK !!

From: Jasper
20-May-21
Hip flexor weakness has been my Achilles heal on past hunts so I’m training specifically for my September caribou hunt. Google it and good luck!!!!

From: Mad Trapper
20-May-21
I hunted with Dennis twice. First trip I partially tore my Achilles tendon on the way in. Finished the hunt hobbled. Put three arrows in a goat, but didn't recover it. Watched Jake arrow one the first full day on the mountain. Second hunt, I arrowed a goat on the first full day on the mountain. Challenging hike from sea level to the alpine. Once on the alpine, not too bad. You can't do enough physical prep. When you think that you have done enough, do more. Dennis will get you a shot. Can't say enough good about him.

From: BowJangles
25-May-21
@Capra, the only way I can get this muscle off of me is to burn the candle at both ends. I can lose fat way easier than muscle. The extreme deficit is the only effective method for me and running this lean is a requisite for muscle loss. I will have cheat meals as needed to get my glycogen stores refilled. Other than the low calorie grind is in full effect.

25-May-21
Carrying too much muscle up the hills is a disadvantage. But not as much as carrying too much fat like must of us do :^)>

Another topic I’m sure your well aware of, is to train to your heart rate. Learn your resting , working and Maximum heart rates. Then when on the mountain stay under your max. Or don’t go above max too long. You will last longer day to day by wearing a heart rate monitor and following it.

Read this article. Runners World Heart rate training can make you faster. Here’s how

From: Medicinemann
25-May-21
Eric, Remember, you're starting this hunt at sea level. You will probably max out at a peak elevation of about 2,800-3,000 feet. Mad Trapper climbed to up to goat country on one and a half legs. It had nothing to do with his previous training. He simply refused to quit. Having met you in person, I know that you possess the exact same trait......Mental toughness...... and a positive attitude will pay big dividends as well. Learn the "rest step", continue shooting at various angles, enjoy the preparation process, embrace the anticipation, and start thinking of a gift for your wife (just before you tell her that you "need" a full mount, as well as a place to put it). I'd like to add one more point for you to consider.....everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. I did a LOT of shooting (uphill and downhill) before my 2008 sheep hunts. I never became as deadly accurate as I wished to be.....I was lethal....I shot with confidence.....but no shot was ever a slam dunk. I believe that it is more important to learn YOUR individual limitations, than it will be to try to meet other peoples established standards. One thing that I learned about myself after days (maybe even weeks of preparation), was that I simply didn't shoot that well when I had one foot higher than the other. I learned that even if my feet were close together (even touching), I shot significantly better than if my feet were spread apart, but at different elevations. THOSE are the types of findings that I suggest you try to identify. While the rest of the Bowsite community will be with you in spirit, only you and Dennis will be in goat country. Focus on adapting the hunt to your strengths while trying to avoid situations that require you to perform under less than optimum conditions for YOUR limitations....whether it be shooting in a strong cross wind, shooting with feet at different elevations, etc. Be sure to take a couple good books, in case you get weathered in.....oh, Dennis likes Crown Royal. Take a flask (if it suits you) for a celebratory drink when you have tagged your billy.

From: bigswivle
25-May-21
This thread is as close as I’ll ever get to a goat hunt. LOL. Good luck man.

From: BowJangles
25-May-21
@Jay, great advise on the heart rate monitor. I just ordered one. The sled training idea was pure gold. I've change my entire approach to this hunt from a training perspective. Cardio 4-5 days a week with very little gym time. Seems to be working.

@Jake, the rest step method has been super useful. Typically I only have one gear when it comes to training and it's pedal to the metal, full speed ahead. Learning to actually slow down is taking some getting used to but it's coming. I owe you some Mt Goat hotdogs! LOL. If I get one I'll have to bring some by.

I really appreciate all the responses fellas. You guys are awesome. Thank you!!

From: BigSkyHntr
25-May-21
Good luck, hope ya shoot a whopper!

From: Nick Muche
27-May-21
You’re going goat hunting, not climbing Everest. Bring a good attitude, decent physical shape and shoot well. Best of luck!

28-May-21
Of course your correct Nick. Your more versed in the terrain in that area of the world than I am.

But it sounds like a Eric has a lot of work out experience and enjoys the fitness lifestyle. So why not be 100% prepared. Or even over prepared. I doubt many guides say “I wish my client would have prepared less”

From: SDHNTR(home)
28-May-21
FYI, Dennis doesn’t go up the mountain himself much anymore. His guys do, while he stays in town for logistics.

From: BowJangles
29-May-21
@nick I treat everything I prepare for like I’m heading up Everest. Lol. I’ve got a bad habit of having the urge to over prepare or else I feel underprepared. Like Jay said I enjoy the fitness aspect so going balls-to-the-wall with the training is right up my alley. Plus this type of training is totally new to me so that makes it exciting as well.

I LOVE goats! Easily my favorite animal. I’ll be pure giddy with excitement when I get there so the attitude will definitely be cheery.

@Nate. I didn’t expect to hunt along side Dennis himself. If so that’ll be completely awesome. I’ve heard nothing but good things about his guides so either way I’ll be in good hands.

I still remember sitting in my apartment in Colorado Springs as a young Airman around ‘98-99 watching Dennis and Tom hunt for his goat. It’ll be super cool to meet him in person and shake his hand.

Hope y’all are having a great Memorial Day weekend!!

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo
Update: Training is going super well. I've been getting in hour and a half sessions in the stairwell at work with the weighted vest and got up and down at Old Rag this weekend with the wife. It wasn't easy with a 35lb pack on in certain spots but it definitely wasn't hard.

The biggest win of that trip was the next morning I wasn't as sore as I expected to be and could have repeated the hike.

I did get crampy in the calves toward the top. I plan to supplement with electrolytes on my next trip. I sweat like a hog and by the time I got to the top I'd pushed out a huge amount of sodium.

I feel ahead of schedule diet wise. I was 243.8 Friday morning. As of now I'm down 25lbs. I'm still shooting for 230lbs. At that weight I'll be down to bare metal and not lugging any extra junk up the hill.

My confidence is high, I'm shooting well and moving well. Those goats are in trouble!

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

27-Jun-21
Holly cow dude. Lugging those Arms alone would be a chore.

But at least you will be able to carry the whole thing down when you’re shoot one

From: caribou77
27-Jun-21
You’re going to do great with that workout schedule. Keep it up.

From: SteveB
27-Jun-21
On a side note….. I think Altitude Sickness should chronicle his Everest climb with a photo essay here on Bowsite.

From: t-roy
27-Jun-21
Be careful, Eric…..Looks like you’re about to waste away!

Like you stated in a post above, “those goals are in trouble”!

27-Jun-21
Working out that hard with such a restricted diet could lead to injury. Be careful and make it all worth the effort

27-Jun-21
To me the toughest part of a goat hunt in coastal rain forest or even temperate rain forest is fighting the jungle to get to tree line. Most times you can’t even see your feet. You are not on any kind of a trail. You are climbing over and under big logs and deadfall, constantly having to lift your legs up high, pushing brush away, tripping, falling down, getting slapped in the face with brush, etc. It’s physically and mentally brutal, especially if it’s hot, humid and bug infested! If there is also trail clearing with a machete it’s next level brutal but I would assume your guide would do any of that? So not sure if any training simulation for that kind of thing is possible for you? Mentally of course it’s a great challenge.

And then on another note being able to lay in a tent for possibly days and wait weather out is another very tough mental task, sometimes worse than the physical part. I would have audio books, backup chargers for your phone and maybe even an old school, very thick book with small writing so it lasts longer as backup. I’ve had a few guys on sheep hunts use a break in bad weather to get the heck out they are going so stir crazy. They are afraid of missing flights home, they get home sick, scared. If there are bears around they can’t sleep at night and they just fall apart, even very fit guys sometimes. And I think my relaxed attitude about being weathered in and 8-9 hrs of solid sleep each night, not concerned about bears, made then irritated too. But I was getting paid to be there, not paying to be there.

Try to enjoy just being there and living the experience and that will greatly up your chance for success!

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21
@ Jay...I've been trying to get rid of these arms for years but nothing works. lol

@ WV I totally agree and I'm being as cautious as possible. I've got way too much invested in this hunt to break myself 2 months out! I run fairly depleted most of the week but I'll throw cheats at myself here and there as my energy levels and look dictate. It recharges my metabolism and keeps my leptin levels up. The scale is moving in the right direction and I'm getting in good workouts. Right now I don't feel like I'm overdoing it to the point of injury but being cautious nonetheless.

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21
@Mike I've reached out to several folks that have hunted with Dennis and heard the exact same thing about fighting the bush. One guy said getting to spike camp took 8 hours with no shortage of bushwhacking. I'll definitely have a book packed as well as a charger pack for my electronics. My biggest concern is weather. Just hoping I get a decent 6 days.

From: Leo17
27-Jun-21
Good luck. Goat hunting is amazing. I killed mine in BC 9 years ago. I want to go back one day but will most likely be Alaska as well. What made you not go back to BC?

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21
@Leo, what's up man! I saw pics of your bears from Jonah's place and shot you a friend/follow request. Very well done. That looked like a killer trip! I've gotta wait till '23 before I head to Jonah's.

My trip to BC was killer. My guide was great and we saw tons of goats but none that wanted to play along. I guess I just want to check out AK. For me this is about adventure as much as it is the hunt so I want to see lots of places. That being said Dennis has a rock solid rep with archery goats and as stubborn as I am about getting one with the bow I think it's the best option.

27-Jun-21
Thanks is for the reply bowjangles. I had a goat hunt take 7 hrs to cover the 3.1 miles to get out of tree line and I was totally spent! It was a full body 7 hr workout. I hadn’t really recovered from it 5 days later with more alpine hiking stacked on top of it. Above tree line, steep side hilling was the greatest challenge. We had to have our stiff boots laced as tight as possible, and walk for hours on the edges of the sole. Your toes go numb and the soles of your feet ache. How do you train for that? Walk ditches on the side of a road for 50 miles before the hunt I guess? Or just tough it out and get beat up during the hunt is all we did. My 5 goat hunts were Northern BC hunts, 50 miles off the coast, maybe different than where you are going?

From: SDHNTR(home)
27-Jun-21
You can forget about getting 6 nice days. In the history of Cordova, I don’t think that has ever happened! At least not in September, their wettest month of the year. Fret not, however, 1-3 decent days is usually all you’ll need, the other few days are just to allow you time to wait for weather to break. Just be ready to capitalize when you can.

The other thing you can’t train for is walking with crampons strapped to your boots. Try walking in your wife’s high heels with sticks and muck stuck in them. They are miserable! But do not take them off. You may seriously lose your life if you slip without them on. And absolutely bring leukotape! Those crampons change the way your boots rub. Add in swampy feet from the saturation and blisters are a certainty. You just need to manage them. Care for your feet or your whole hunt is toast.

From: BowJangles
27-Jun-21
Oh the weather is my biggest concern by far! I’m mentally preparing myself to be wet for a week straight. I’ve got leukotape in the pack!

Crampons will be new to me so I’ll embrace the suck when the time comes.

@Mike I haven’t done much side hilling. I need to put that in the mix.

From: Pop-r
27-Jun-21
Sounds like you spend a lot of time & money preparing! Good luck!

From: BowJangles
12-Sep-21
Wheels up at 5:15pm today! I wound up getting down to 236lbs, I’m shooting super well and my confidence is high. Weather in Cordova looks like typical weather in Cordova, cold and wet. It’s gonna happen this time. I’ve got a super good feeling about the hunt. I can’t decide if I’m more nervous or excited. I’ll keep the thread updated as service allows.

Cheers!

From: BowJangles
12-Sep-21
Wheels up at 5:15pm today! I wound up getting down to 236lbs, I’m shooting super well and my confidence is high. Weather in Cordova looks like typical weather in Cordova, cold and wet. It’s gonna happen this time. I’ve got a super good feeling about the hunt. I can’t decide if I’m more nervous or excited. I’ll keep the thread updated as service allows.

Cheers!

12-Sep-21
Very exciting. Please keep us posted if

12-Sep-21
Good luck

From: Bou'bound
12-Sep-21
Make some memories

From: bigeasygator
12-Sep-21
Good luck! It’ll be a blast!

From: Medicinemann
12-Sep-21
Aim small, miss small. Say Hi to Dennis for me.

From: huntinelk
12-Sep-21
Good luck

From: Potro
13-Sep-21
Good luck and say hello to Dennis for me. We had the worst weather that you can imagine when we were hunting, I am sure that he keep the pictures of all the water in the tend. later we have a chance to get a nice billy

From: Hancock West
13-Sep-21
Best of Luck Bowjangles! I'm guessing Day 4 is your day

From: t-roy
13-Sep-21
Good luck, Eric!

From: BowJangles
21-Sep-21
I’m back in Cordova after a tough hunt. I’ve got tons of gear to get sorted and a quick turn around to VA before I take off to Ryk’s place in Edmonton. I’ll update the thread with the hunt details once I get some down time.

From: bigeasygator
21-Sep-21
Looking forward to the update. Mountain goat hunts are never short on adventure!

From: Ambush
22-Sep-21
Starting to sound like a goat hunt in the northwest. Good luck in Alberta!

From: tkjwonta
22-Sep-21
Can't wait to hear all about it Eric! I've got a goat hunt on the books for 2024, and I feel like I should've started training yesterday.

From: Old hunter
22-Sep-21
Hard work pays off.

From: boothill
22-Sep-21
I think we are all waiting patiently for hunt updates Eric. Hope you had a great hunt and adventure.

From: Mad Trapper
22-Sep-21
Good luck!! Tell Dennis I said hello. Great outfit!

From: Korey Wolfe
22-Sep-21
Say hi to Ryk for me...

Korey Wolfe

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21
So I'm finally back from my Goat and Moose hunts and what a crazy few weeks its been.

We'll start the story as I arrive in Cordova.

The quick hop from Anchorage to Cordova was amazing! The views were incredible. This being my first time to Alaska I was snapping pics like a tourist the entire time. We land to typical Alaska weather; cold, cloudy and wet. The airport in Cordova was easily the smallest airport I've ever been to. The bags come off the plane at almost the same time we do. Even though folks are wearing masks I recognize Dennis instantly. We exchange greetings, load up our luggage and off we go. My hunting buddy Sean and I load up with Dennis and the 2 other hunters load up with Wes. Dennis drops us off at The Reluctant Fisherman to get checked in and says he'll be back in a few hours to take us to his place for paperwork and dinner. I've heard about Alicia's cooking and was super excited to give it a day in court. We get all checked in and in a couple hours we get the call. We load up the bows and head over to Casa De Zadra.

Upon arrival there's ton of activity at Dennis's place. Guides are shaking gear out, guys are shooting their bows, going over their rigs and talking Goats. There was an energy there that got me even more excited about what was to come. After shooting my bow and seeing that it was still driving nails we make our way inside to get paperwork taken care of and have some dinner.

Alicia made pasta with a Moose and Goat meat sauce. It was INCREDIBLE!!! After nearly eating myself into a coma we wrap up the night and head back to the hotel. We're to be the second group to leave in the morning. Wheels up at 11am. My excitement level is through the roof!!!

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: Bowboy
04-Oct-21
Keep it coming this is going to be good!

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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04-Oct-21

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From: Treeline
04-Oct-21
Adventure of a Lifetime! Keep em rolling!

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21
Sept 14th. Travel day.

The day is finally here! My morning started at around 6:30am. I tried to get a bit more sleep, knowing what the day had in store, but it wasn't happening. I got up, showered and headed over to Baja Taco. Their breakfast burritos with Reindeer sausage are ridiculous! I washed one down with a cup of coffee and two waters and back to the room I went. I nearly walked a hole in the carpet waiting for the call. About 11:15am the phone rings.........

Wes is on the way to pick us up! We grab the gear, check out and met him out front for the ride over to Dennis's place. Once we're there it's on! We get changed into our hunting clothes, dump any gear we don't need, swap out field points for broad heads, grab an ice ax and gloves and to the lake we go. When we arrive Dave is there getting the float plane ready. At this point I'm so excited that I feel like dancing! We get the gear loaded, get well wishes from Dennis and then Adam, Caleb, Sean and I get onboard.

The flight to base camp was gorgeous. Cordova from the air really shows how quaint of a town it is. We're off to Goat country!!!!

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21
The pic loading algorithm on here stinks. Why does it load the pic but not let you rotate said pic in the "image tools" GUI? Frustrating.

From: elkmtngear
04-Oct-21
I thought you were just flying with a "stunt pilot", lol !

Keep it coming, I'll stand on my head to view the pics, if I have to ;^)

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21
After a quick 45 minute float plane ride we get to our spot. The float plane touches down so smoothly that had it not been for the rooster tails coming off of the pontoons I wouldn't have known that we were on the water. We cruise up to the beach and start unpacking. With base camp set up we shot our bows a few more times and the we start the push up the hill. All the training, dieting, shooting, researching and dreaming about goats and it's finally time to go after them!

Adam leads the charge uphill. The walking is super easy at first and we stop briefly here and there to grab a handful of wild blueberries. The weather isn't terribly cold and there's a light drizzle coming down. I'm still giddy with excitement and every step gets me closer to Goats!

Treeline! Once we make it through the meadows we hit the first set of trees. Walking uphill through the wet, thick blueberry bushes and devil's club was like walking uphill through a car wash. Picking my way through it was the toughest challenge. Once we broke through to the next meadow we stopped to put on our cramp-ons. The next set of trees was twice as steep and twice as long. I'd never used cramp-ons before but they went on fairly easily and made a huge difference in regards to tractions. Onwards and upwards! This is were it got tough.

The hill was steep, really steep! I was using the cramp-ons to walk uphill on my toes. This turned out to be a bad idea, really bad! Over the summer I experienced cramping during my training. Anyone that's hiked in Virginia during the summer can tell you there's no shortage of sweat. On my hikes I'd sweat really bad and get cramps near the top of Old Rag. I knew I was pushing out too many electrolytes and started replacing them with a powder supplement. It fixed the issue and I never gave it a second thought. I packed 8 days worth of electrolytes in ziplock bags and had them in my water bottle as we went up. Apparently my calves hate cramp-ons. About 3/4ths of the way up through the trees I felt that squirrel in my calf that always precedes a cramp and my heart sinks. This can't be happening! I'm not halfway into the hike up and my calves are quitting on me. I downed the rest of my water bottle, refilled it with more electrolytes, pounded them, ate some corn nuts and took a breather. I wasn't tired but on the verge of cramping. This isn't good. Sean and Adam keep pushing and after a few minutes Caleb and I get it back in gear.

100 yards later it happens. My right side calf locks up hard. I go down immediately. I can't believe what's going on! I felt like the entire hunt is falling apart and we're not 2 hours from camp. I make it out of the trees into somewhat level ground and start to stretch my calves out. I drink more water and salty food and we keep pushing. I had to be careful not to over use my right leg which in turn put more stress on my left leg. Before long the left calf went too. I had to stop, drink more water and try to get more food in before going further. By now we're soaking wet and it's getting cold. We're out of the trees and into the more mellow terrain but the damage was done. I assume my technique was the issue. Walking uphill on my tiptoes just put too much stress on my calves and they couldn't take it. I should have walked up on the sides of my feet. In hindsight this would have been a much better way to go about things. About halfway between tree line and spike camp the cramps moved to my quads. I've got a pit in my stomach by now. I felt like I was letting everyone down and questioning everything I'd been doing the last 8 months. We set spike camp about 45 minutes from where Adam wanted it to be. At that point every step I took caused something to cramp. Once the tents were up Sean and I go in, changed into dry clothes, had a cider and a Mountain House and tried to warm up. I spent most of that time rubbing and stretching my legs hoping like hell they wouldn't let me down the next day. The anxiety of feeling like I was slowing the team down kept me up all night. I dozed off here and there but practically didn't sleep.

Day 1:

I heard Caleb unzip his tent around 8am. He got us some water boiling for breakfast along with more cider. I threw back more electrolytes and rubbed my legs. They still had that weak feeling like muscles do after they cramp. Caleb brings over our breakfast and says "there's 3 billies on the hill about 400 yards away." This threw some life back in me! I got dressed, hoping I wouldn't cramp up, and crawled out of the tent.

It was raining, windy and cold but my legs weren't cramping. The more I moved the better they felt and my excitement grew! In the back of my mind I knew my legs weren't 100% but at least I was moving. We packed up camp and moved to where we were initially going to set up. If they were going to cramp now was the time. When we got to the new spot my legs had warmed up and felt less weak. I was back in the game!! We set camp and put a plan together to get on goats.

We hiked up to the top of the hill and could see goats in several different spots. It was incredible! We picked the hill apart for a few hours before deciding to make a play on the goats we'd seen from the first spike camp. Of the 3 goats one had no horns. Adam said they'd seen him for years. One was immature but one was a shooter. We slowly made our way around the back side of the hill. Once we made it about 3/4th's of the way around Adam told me to drop my pack and to take my bow out. As of that moment I was actually hunting goats! At this point I'd totally forgotten about my legs. I was moving fine, had a bow in my hand and we were peaking over ledges looking for billies.

We picked that face of the hill apart for hours with no sign of the goats. With a pretty good walk back to spike camp ahead of us we started to head back. It had been raining and windy all day and a hot cider and a mountain house sounded killer! On the way back to camp Adam suddenly hits the deck. There was a young billy 92 yards downhill on the same path we had used early in the day. The assumption was made that he was the one young billy in the group of 3 and the others were behind him. After 45 minutes of sitting the wind and rain began to take it's toll and the shaking started. Adam made the call to go back up the hill and work our way around in the hopes that we could stalk in on the other goats if they were with him. As we made our way around the wind took a switch, the young billy caught our scent and off he went. With no sign of the other 2 goats day 1 was a wrap. Back to the tents we went.

I just wanna go on record and say I like Mountain House meals! They really hit the spot. Kinda light on calories for a bigger guy like me but very tasty!

Day 2:

With the 3 goats nowhere to found and multiple goats further away the decision was made to move camp again. The weather that morning was pretty crappy. Driving wind and rain and there were a few times in the night that I thought we were getting blown off the mountain. We wound up getting a late start due to the weather but got camp moved and made a plan to work into a bedded goat early the morning of Day 3. He had been in that spot all day on Day 1 and was still bedded there at the close of Day 2. He was only 800 yards away! After a half day out of the tent we got camp moved, made a plan for the morning, had more cider, more Mountain House and called it a day. The next 3 days called for decent weather with maybe a bit of sun. After spending the last 3 days fairly cold, wet and miserable the thought of a little sunshine sounded great. Day 2 was in the books.

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
04-Oct-21
Awesome story so far! I can totally relate to sweating and cramping issues...thought I had mine licked before my elk hunt but had to deal with them again the first couple days. Hope you are done with yours now as well!

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21
Day 3:

I woke up the morning of day 3 to a bright tent and no sound of rain. This was going to be a great day! We peaked around the knob we had camped behind and the goat had moved...up hill.....of course. After breakfast, lots of water and my morning glory we laid out our wet clothes on rocks, got our packs on and headed off.

The goat had gone up the peak and bedded on a snow patch. 3 other very nice billies had bedded on a ridge line waaaay off in the distance. It took us about an hour to get to a point to where we dumped our packs, got out the bow and started stalking. We had a pretty good feel for where the goat had bedded and the path we needed to take to work in on him. After another 45 minute we were close. As we were creeping along I could see the landmarks that we made note of before the stalk. It felt electric! Knowing where I was, what I was stalking and having a bow in my hand was surreal. Every step took me closer to the goat. The loose rock made the stalk slow going. Eventually we made it to the area below the goat that had about a 30 yard gap in the rocks. Adam peaked the corner and said "he's right there." I had my sight dialed to 35 yards, I stepped into the opening and drew. All I was saw was the goats ass as he trotted off the snow patch, around the corner and onto a sheer ledge about 115 yards away. We were busted! That was officially the closet I'd ever been to a Mountain Goat.

Next we turned our attention to the other 3 goats on the far end of the ridge. From camp they looked impossible to get on but from where we were it wasn't awful.....except for the Devil's Backbone! It was this razor thin ledge that was right above a bowl with about a 400ft drop. For me it was scary. I'm a bigger guy and I'm not nearly as nimble as I used to be so getting across that was like walking a tight rope. Once we crossed that it was smooth sailing. We get to an area close to where we saw the goats bedded and Adam goes into stalk mode. After a couple hours of looking with no luck we spot them on the back side of the hill where we had just came from. Basically we came across the face of the hill while they went the opposite way across the back. They eventually came down the ridge and into the bowl that the backside of the mountain was overlooking. They bedded in a terrible spot for a stalk. After briefly discussing the situation we agreed to head back to camp. It was around 4:30pm. The logic was that since we'd pushed the first billy it wasn't in our best interest to booger the other 3 without good reason. Back to camp we went. We got back to camp with some light to spare, our clothes were dry and we'd been in the sunshine all day. I can remember how fortunate I felt to have had the opportunity to spend such a gorgeous day hunting what I consider to be the coolest animal in North America.

The weather looked awesome for the next 2 days. We had goats spotted, my legs were with the program and we still have 3 more days to hunt. I had 2 Mountain House's and some cider for dinner and called it a day.

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

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04-Oct-21
Great pics and story. How many hunters are in the same tent camp

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
04-Oct-21
Jay, it was just Sean and I. 2 x1 hunt.

04-Oct-21
Thanks.

From: SDHNTR(home)
05-Oct-21
Keep it coming!

From: kota-man
05-Oct-21
Good stuff! Can’t wait to hear the finish…

From: SDHNTR(home)
05-Oct-21
I’m also curious to know how you liked that stone glacier tent? Was that your personal tent that you brought along? Or did Dennis provide that?

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21
Nate, that was our packer, Caleb's tent. He said he really like it and had run it on quite a few hunts previously.

From: SDHNTR(home)
06-Oct-21
My first hunt with Dennis killed a brand new Hilleberg tent. Leaked like a sieve. I'm always interested in the shelters he's using since I know they'll get tested to the max..

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21
Day 4:

We wake up to more sunshine, hot food and a plan to get on goats. After everyone is up and moving we head out. It's around 8:30am. It takes us a few hours to get back to the ridgeline overlooking the bowl where we last left the goats. The hiking is going really well and all the issues I'd had with cramping had thankfully gone away. After crossing the Devil's Backbone we got into stalk mode. We dropped the packs and started peaking over into the bowl. About 750 yards away we spot a billy.....in a perfect spot!!! He had positioned himself on the left side of a little knob facing away from us, looking into the wind and with rocks on his right side to cover our stalk. If I could get to the edge of the knob he was behind I'd be inside 40 yards. That's bad news if you're a goat. The plan was to walk down the ridgeline, drop into the bowl, make it down a ~400ft scree slide as quietly as possible and stalk in from there. Let's go!!!!

We cross the ridgeline on the back side of the hill as to not skyline ourselves. Once we make it to the scree slide we sneak over slowly and start making our way down. Quiet isn't really doable. Nearly every step sends rocks rolling. As I make my way down I look up and see Adam giving the universal hand gesture for "Get the f**k down" and I freeze. I'm stuck on the side of the hill like spiderman. I hold tight for a few minutes and then slowly turn my head to see what all the fuss was about. A goat had come up and over the ledge in-between us and the first goat we were stalking. He was walking right at us! This just got super interesting. Goat move in a very deliberate way. They never seem to be in a hurry and this big ol boy lumbered toward us at a snails pace. The fact that I was stuck to the hill in such an awkward way made time drag on. Rocks were digging into my knees and I had a death grip on a small rock to keep myself in place. The goat made his way to a small snow patch and bedded with his butt at 7 o'clock and his head at 1 o'clock. He'd occasionally look back toward the other goat. When he did we'd try to slowly cover ground. After 20 yards of so he heard us and looked over. WE froze again. He'd look off and we'd move. He'd hear us again and look over. The 3rd time he looked over he stood up and stared us down. I figured he'd seen and heard and was leaving for good. This seemed fine at the time since the initial goat we were after was in a better spot for a bow shot. Ever so slowly the goat turns to walk off, takes a few steps and beds down behind a rock putting himself in a worst spot to keep and eye on us and a perfect spot for a stalk. Unreal!

As a kid my old man used to tell me that anytime I looked up and saw a Hawk it was him looking over me. I hadn't seen anything but Ravens this entire trip. As that goat bedded I heard a scream and looked up an saw a Golden Eagle. Now I'm not the superstitious type by any stretch of the imagination but looking up and seeing that Eagle at that exact moment sent chills up my spine. Something was about to happen!

After inching down the scree slide a bit more we'd gotten totally out of the goats view. We planned a route to him and took each step as easily as possible. My heart was banging so loud I could have sworn Adam could hear it. About 150 yards away we dump the packs and boots, I gave Adam my range finder, I nocked an arrow and we push forward. Our steps are totally silent. I'm in socks and Adam is in neoprene boot liners. As we make our way to the rock Adam starts calling ranges. 65 yards to the back of the snow patch, 20 yards to the front, 35 to the middle. The rock the goat is behind is angled up slightly. I anxiously put my foot on it and ease up an inch at a time. After several small steps I can see his tracks in the snow. I hear Adam call out 26 yards. I spin the Landslyde sight, come to full draw and inch up slightly. I CAN SEE HIM! He's bedded and looking dead at us with his head at 7 o'clock and his butt at 1 o'clock. I've got his vitals in my sights but with the angle of the rock I want to insure that I have clearance and that I don't send an arrow off the edge of the rock. I take an easy step up and I'm laser focused on his chest. It his point my heartbeat is deafening and I've got severe tunnel vision. As I'm looking at the goat an arrow simply materialize in an absolutely perfect spot tight to his shoulder and disappears into his body. I can see blood before he leaves his bed. I have no idea what happened but my brain must have hit the autopilot switch and sent that arrow. It was a fatal hit! The goat gets to his feet and runs back in the direction he came. We have no idea what's over the ledge. It could be cliffs or more mellow ground. Adam busts out "I've gotta go" and runs after the goat.

I need to take a second to mention what an absolute machine that man was. I'm convinced that he runs on 93 Octane.

If I'd have ran across those rocks with socks on my feet would look like I put them in a blender. Meanwhile Adam sprints over them, full speed, in neoprene booties. He's gone for what seems like forever and I'm just frozen there. I'd just put a perfectly placed arrow in a Billy at 26 yards. I can't believe what just happened! Adam finally sticks his head up and motions for me to come over. No thumbs up, no real excitement, just a casual "come here" gesture. Now I'm nervous...

I slowly make my way over to where the goat had gone. Adam whispers "he's right over that ledge looking at me but he keeps putting his head down. Take a peak." I can see blood on the rocks as I take a look over. As I ease over I see him. He's bedded with his head down but still breathing. At this point emotion grabs me really hard. I've wanted a goat with a bow since I'd gotten into archery and now I have him. The moment was overwhelming. Seconds later the goat expired and took a small tumble off of the ledge he was on. I had officially killed a Mountain Goat with a bow!!!!

Caleb and Sean had watched the entire thing from the scree slide and were on the way over to us with all the gear we'd dropped. I couldn't wait to get my boots on so I could go see my goat!

As I suit up Caleb goes to my goat while Adam and Sean make there way over to see if the other goats were in the area. Sean was bowhunting as well but would have no issues using the lead launcher if needed.

I can't really describe what it was like to walk up on my goat. Even though he monkeyed up a horn in the fall everything about him was perfect! I couldn't have been happier with him. I take a few minutes to really look at him before I recruit Caleb to take pics of me for 45 minutes straight. lol.

As we're sitting there talking the stalk over we hear a shot........then another.........then another. We look at each other and Caleb says "We aren't getting back to camp until midnight" and we wasn't far from wrong. Shortly Sean comes back and sounds off with "We're all tagged out!!!" What a freaking day. Sun on our backs, goats down and now the business of breaking them down starts.

Goats are big....like really BIG!! I was 235ish and my goat made me look small. I still can't get over how big he was, just a tank of an animal. Once the goats are skinned and deboned the trek up back to spike camp starts. It was dark, we had that steep scree slide to get up and the Devil's Backbone to cross. Wes was packing up food from basecamp that day. He agreed to come back to where we were and help us pack the goats off the mountain.

The climb up that slide was rough. It was the first time as an adult that I'd actually been scared for my life. One wrong move and it was all over. That feeling was quickly followed up by the second time as and adult being scared for my life on the Devil's Backbone.

We had left camp around ~8:30am and we got back at ~1:15am. 3.5 miles of the 8.5 mile pack out had been done in the dark. That walk was one of the hardest things I've ever done.

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: Mad Trapper
06-Oct-21
Congrats!

From: deerhunter72
06-Oct-21
Incredible!! You put us right there with you. Congratulations for fulfilling your dream!

From: boothill
06-Oct-21
Congratulations Eric!!

From: iceman
06-Oct-21
Hell yeah man! Congrats again!

06-Oct-21
Congrats Eric!!! That had to be a great experience.

From: Treeline
06-Oct-21
Spectacular! Congratulations on a hunt of a Lifetime! Great goat and excellent write up!

From: huntinelk
06-Oct-21
Congratulations on a super goat and awesome adventure. It's so cool to accomplish a long time goal after all the hard work that you put in preparing for the trip.

From: t-roy
06-Oct-21
Terrific write up, Eric! An epic adventure for sure! Congrats on a beautiful goat, as well!

From: elkmtngear
06-Oct-21
Excellent recap, and a great Trophy!

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21
Day 5:

After a short, restless sleep we're out of the tents around 9am. We wake up to another gorgeous day! After a solid breakfast we break down spike camp, repack our bags and get ourselves ready for the walk back to base camp. This was the hard part. Full packs and 5 miles ahead of us. Thankfully the weather was nice. Doing this in driving rain and cold temps would be awful. We have about an hour hike up hill and once we're over that it's all down hill. All went well until the freaking cramp-ons go back on. Now I know why Adam says he has a love-hate relationship with these damned things. In certain spots they're a must-have item. Going down there were these spots of wet moss that look dry. If you stepped on them without the cramp-ons you'd lose your footing and fall. With the cramp-ons you'd be fine. We hit the same spot of treeline that I was cramping on the way and the cramp-ons went back on. My body just doesn't like them. The stresses on my calves makes them very unhappy, even the downhill portion.

After the slow paced trek through the thick bush we hit the swampy area and Adam called the pilot. Dave said he'd be there in an hour. Our other packer Wes went ahead and beat us to camp by 20 minutes. He's Adam's nephew and those guys have something special in their blood. He was 23, weighted maybe 150lbs and had no less than 125lbs on his back. He and Adam walked down the hill like it was a stroll in the park. I would second guess every step I took and used the ice ax 85% of the trip down. Those two looked like they could run down the hill without any problems. It was one of the most impressive displays of physical strength and ability I've ever witnessed. Our packer Caleb was just as good! This was his Caleb's first hunt on Dennis's team and he did an outstanding job. My hat is off to those three gentleman and I'd be honored to hunt with any one of them again.

The sight of the base camp tents in the distance was a welcome sight. The day to day hiking of the hunt was fine. I wasn't prepared for the heavy hike down. It was tough, really tough. That being said putting one foot in front of the other was pretty easy when I'd stop and realize the weight on my back was a 9.5 year old, 10" billy and that I was earning the ability to cherish him in my trophy room with every step.

Once we made camp we dumped our packs and helped Wes break down the rest of camp. Before long we could here the buzz of the float plan in the distance. A hot shower, dinner and a good night sleep was just a few hours away!

In closing this was the trip of a lifetime for me. I got a goat that far exceeded any expectations I had and I couldn't be more pleased with him.

Dennis and his team are complete professionals. All the logistic of the hunt were executed perfectly from transportation to and from camp, the gear we used, the in-camp meals and snacks, the hunting skills of the guides and trophy and meat care. No stone was unturned and Dennis took us into his home like family. Alicia was amazing and her cooking will curl your toes under!!

As always the support from all the fellas on Bowsite was incredible. A huge Thank You to all the folks that chimed in with well wishes and pats on the back. You guys are alright!!!

From: Old hunter
06-Oct-21
Know how hard you worked for this hunt and it paid off, proud, proud Father. Always look up my heart is with you every day.

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: Nick Muche
06-Oct-21
Nice work! That goat is a cranker too, BTW! One of the guides texted me that you got one and that made me super happy for you. Goat hunts are tough work, and you made it happen. Congrats!

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
06-Oct-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: pav
06-Oct-21
Great billy and an epic bowhunting adventure...congrats and thanks for sharing!!!

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
06-Oct-21
This has been a great thread to follow! Congrats on every aspect...the preparation, the hunt and the satisfaction of seeing it all come together.

From: Scott/IL
06-Oct-21
Congrats Eric! I’ve been waiting for this story since seeing the pictures. A dream hunt for sure and you made the most of it!

From: bigeasygator
06-Oct-21
Congrats on an awesome goat!! Your write up brought back a lot of memories the times I chased them. Nothing quite like hunting the beast the color of winter!

From: hdaman
06-Oct-21
Your story telling is second only to your determination on the mountain. Thanks for taking us along and congrats on a lifetime of memories!

From: rooster
06-Oct-21
Great goat and story. Thanks for taking the time to share your adventure.

From: Bowboy
06-Oct-21
Congrats!

From: molsonarcher
06-Oct-21
Congrats on a fantastic trophy and adventure. THAT is the way to tell a story. The pics and write up were second to none.

From: SDHNTR(home)
06-Oct-21
Awesome story. You’re right, Adam and Wes are as tough as men get. And Crampons are mid evil torture devices! Congrats on a great goat. Thanks for sharing the story!

From: Medicinemann
07-Oct-21
I have waited a year and a half for this adventure to unfold......and it was worth the wait. Well done.......now on to hunt #2.....

From: bowhunter24
07-Oct-21
Outstanding, really enjoyed your hunt and pictures thank you sir!

07-Oct-21
Crampons are a lot easier for small skinny people. But they still take getting used to.

From: Mad Trapper
07-Oct-21
I remember the powder house. I believe that is where Jake ate two blaster burgers and I was introduced to razer clams….

07-Oct-21
Well Eric, just wanted to let you know that you just screwed up my morning schedule and going to the gym. Just before I was to leave, I came upon the rest of your story. The mistake I made was, I started to follow along. That was an hour ago.

But in reality, Thanks for the entertainment, the fantastic write up, the adventure in words and pictures. I was luck to have killed a Mt Goat here in Colorado and always thought I would go again some day, but after reading your account, day by day and inch by inch, heart pounding, cramping legs; your hunt was my next and last Mt Goat hunt. Nicely done. My best, Paul

From: Rut Nut
07-Oct-21
I was thinking the same thing Altitude Sickness! Crampons are not good for powerlifter types! ;-)

But seriously..............FANTASTIC story and write up! Congrats! I’ve always thought sheep/goat hunting would be cool, but with my fear of heights, I probably would not enjoy it as much as y’all!

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
For those interested we have a rock and ice climbing training center I helped develop and build.

It’s got an altitude training room which simulates working at altitude. Rock and ice walls. To train the proper way to use of Aces and the toe points of crampons.

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
I do not profit from this so it’s not an ad.

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Check out PEABODY ICE CLIMBING Fenton Mi

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude simulation room

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Gear rental

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude simulation room

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo

07-Oct-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Learn to climb safely to retrieve your goat. There are other training centers throughout the west. This is the one I deal with in Michigan. A great work out and challenging winter activity

From: t-roy
07-Oct-21
Last pic looks like an AA meeting, Jay! Altitude Anonymous….

07-Oct-21
That’s a good one T.

It’s as addictive but better for you :^))))

From: txhunter58
10-Oct-21
Good thread

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