Sitka Gear
Mt Goat hunt with Lonesome Dove
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
BowJangles 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
Empty Freezer 10-May-21
Bowboy 10-May-21
midwest 10-May-21
sticksender 10-May-21
Bou'bound 10-May-21
midwest 10-May-21
Potro 10-May-21
Ned mobile 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
Ned mobile 10-May-21
SDHNTR(home) 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
brettpsu 10-May-21
SDHNTR(home) 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
t-roy 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
Beav 10-May-21
BowJangles 10-May-21
SteveB 13-May-21
Bou'bound 14-May-21
SBH 14-May-21
BowJangles 18-May-21
Hancock West 19-May-21
BowJangles 19-May-21
Ambush 19-May-21
t-roy 19-May-21
BowJangles 19-May-21
Paul@thefort 19-May-21
yeager 19-May-21
Ambush 19-May-21
WV Mountaineer 20-May-21
JL 20-May-21
Capra 20-May-21
Jasper 20-May-21
Mad Trapper 20-May-21
BowJangles 25-May-21
Medicinemann 25-May-21
bigswivle 25-May-21
BowJangles 25-May-21
BigSkyHntr 25-May-21
Nick Muche 27-May-21
SDHNTR(home) 28-May-21
BowJangles 29-May-21
From: BowJangles
10-May-21
I wanted to throw a thread up to keep me accountable for my training progress, hear any feedback or advice from the vets here and just to talk about my hunt. Goat is easily my favorite NA animal and this will be my second time chasing them. My first hunt in BC was unsuccessful due to the animals not cooperating. With a rifle that hunt would have been a slam dunk but it turns out I'm too stubborn to put the bow down.

Training is underway and going really well. I'm down 17lbs and looking to drop ~20 more. The diet is in place and even though the calories are lower than lizard piss I've still got good energy.

For now the stairwell and the treadmill have been getting most of my attention. Wednesday will be my first trek up Old Rag here in VA. I'd like to get 10 up and downs in before I leave for AK.

I'm beyond excited for this one so let's hear some goat hunt stories or see some success photos to keep my motivation going!

Cheers boys,

-Eric

From: BowJangles
10-May-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo
Current diet plan and reps in the stairwell.

From: BowJangles
10-May-21

BowJangles's embedded Photo
BowJangles's embedded Photo

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
Current gear list. Any suggestions, advice or words of wisdom are welcome!

Stone Glacier Sky Archer 6400 w/water cover, Kuiu Yukon Rain Gear, Kuiu Guide Jacket, Kuiu Guide Pants, 2 pair, Kuiu Ultra Merino 125 SS shirt, 2, Kuiu Ultra Merino 125 LS shirt, 2, Kuiu Merino Base Layer pants, 3 pair, Kuiu Merino Hoodie (MAYBE), Kuiu Merino Beanie, Kuiu Bino/Rangefinder Harness, First Lite Gloves, Leupold Binos/Rangefinder, Kenetrek Mountain Extreme boots w/extra laces, Kenetrek Liner sock, 3 pair, Kenetrek Alaska over sock, 3 pair, Kenetrek Gaiters, Kifaru 0 Degree Slick Bag, Leukotape Blister kit, Mathews Traverse, 12 arrows w/broadheads, Stan release, Water bottle, Video camera, Anker Battery pack, Chest waders, Wading shoes.

10-May-21
Get ya some Bow. I'm 60 now and workin out towards a hunt is so rewarding for me. One of the things I do is to carry a piece of 3/4" round stock(steel rod) that weighs around 8 lbs on all my hikes. My bow gets heavy at the end of the day. This really helps. Keep Hammerin. Good Luck on your hunt.

From: Bowboy
10-May-21
Good luck on your next goat hunt and keep pushing yourself.

10-May-21
Tie that harness your wearing to a large truck or tractor tire and drag it around behind you. Drag it uphill, down hill, side hill. It builds the legs, lungs and heart. Pick an object ahead, Bush, tree, a fence post and hold your breath while dragging it until you reach that object. Over the summer pick objects further and further away.

There are masks that replicate O2 deprivation. But holding your breath is free.

This is a cheap way to replicate leg burn and Oxygen starvation.

Learn the “Rest Step”

10-May-21
Search “Training Spezial” YouTube

10-May-21
Sorry Eric, search “Training Spezial Christian Stangl “ you tube

From: midwest
10-May-21
Best of luck and have fun!

From: sticksender
10-May-21
Respect to you if you can stick with that diet. One thing to mention is that almond milk has a very high concentration of oxalates, which cause kidney stones. I was a big almond eater until I got a stone a couple years back. Those things can really ruin your day ;-)

Best of luck with your prep program and your hunt!

From: Bou'bound
10-May-21
When you are training and think you've had enough remember this classic about goat hunting:

On a good day of goat hunting you'll be so tired and sore you will be afraid you are going to die. On a tough day of goat hunting you'll be so tired and sore you will be afraid you are not going to die.

From: midwest
10-May-21
There's no workout that could be as brutal as that diet. Damn!

From: Potro
10-May-21
THE HUNT IS HARD, REGARLESS YOUR PREPARATION YOU WILL BE TIRED!!! DENNIS HAS A GREAT OPERATION AND THERE ARE A LOT OF GOAT AND RAIN IN HIS TERRITOTY

10-May-21
Hope you have a good hunt! I am curious about your choice of chest waders and wading boots. I will need something of the like in the future

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
The diet is pretty crappy just because it's so low. I do have a cheat meal once or twice a week depending on energy levels. It's that low because I need to lose muscle as well as fat.

Ned, for chest waders I went with White River and Frogg Togg wading boots. I didn't go "top shelf" since they'll only be used briefly at the beginning and end of the hunt. They met Dennis's approval so they should be good to go.

10-May-21
Thanks!

10-May-21
Of course you’ll get tired. The key difference is your recovery time. You have time to get in good enough shape that you get your breath back quicker and you can get up and out of your bag day after day and get up the hill. Products like hydrate and recover help with lactic acid soreness

From: SDHNTR(home)
10-May-21
I’ve done that hunt with Dennis twice. Yes, physical training is critically important, but mental training is even more important. You cannot physically prepare for being stuck in a spike tent, clinging onto the side of a mountain, in relentless, cold, driving rain. Dennis’ guys will get you UP the mountain, your mental toughness will keep you ON it!

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
How did you fare on your trips, Nate?

From: brettpsu
10-May-21
I'll just echo what Nate said. Be mentally prepared.

From: SDHNTR(home)
10-May-21
My first trip, I only got a chance to get out of the tent for a half day, and I missed! Got my rock landmarks a bit mixed up on my stalk and about stepped on the goat at 6-8 yards. He blew out and when he stopped I had to guess yardage since I was already at full draw, and I shot just over him. Was a brutal 50 yr+ deluge. Hard to imagine rain like that.

On my second trip, the rain pounded again on the first day and I was thinking, no not again! Archery exclusivity was not important to me on this trip. Before I even started I told myself I was coming home with a goat, rifle or bow, but was first going to try with my bow. When the weather broke I found myself at 41 yards again at full draw from a huge B&C Billy. He was quartered to me and I just needed a step. It never came and he blew out of there. He was the only mature goat on our side of the mountain that we could tell. He was too big for me to let him get away. When we caught back up to him several hours later, I shot him with a gun. No regrets. Had great experiences both times, even despite the weather.

Hunted bears with Dennis in 2019 and needed sunscreen. It was downright hot! So be prepared for anything. No bears but my cousin shot a nice Billy.

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
The fact that you got out for half a day and were on goats is impressive! Glad you got a nice goat in the end. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the weather plays nice while I'm in camp.

From: t-roy
10-May-21
“It’s that low because I need to lose muscle as well as fat.”

I’m curious as to why you would need to lose muscle, Eric?

Good luck on your hunt, but as I seem to recall on a few of your recent hunts posted on here, you were tagged out pretty quickly! ;-)

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
If this one goes like the Cougar hunt or the Bison hunt you won't hear a single complaint out of me!

Once upon a time I had a bad habit of bodybuilding. Turns out getting the muscle off is just as hard as putting it on.

I'm currently a lean 250lbs but move much better at 230lbs. That's where I was on my last goat hunt and things felt much better at that weight. Plus it gives me a goal to work toward. I feel like I work better if I have a clear cut goal to try to reach. That being said 230 is the number I've gotta see on the scale. The idea of lugging an extra 20lbs of dead weight up the hill doesn't sit well with me so it's gotta go!

From: Beav
10-May-21
Well it looks like he has plenty of muscle to lose if that is his wish! Good Luck and look forward to following along.

From: BowJangles
10-May-21
Thanks Harlin. Your trophy pics are epic! Very well done man!!

From: SteveB
13-May-21
Will be following along!

From: Bou'bound
14-May-21

Bou'bound's Link
I found this to be inspirational and some great things to apply to time on the mountain and pushing through. it's worth the 18 minutes.

From: SBH
14-May-21
You need to add beer to that diet. It's good for you. Promise.

From: BowJangles
18-May-21
@Bou, that Ted Talk scared me! The amount of mental durability you have to have to do up-downs on EVEREST day after day is near superhuman, never mind the physical ability. Yowzers!

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
I was there in the spring of 2011 at 50 Years old. Most of my team dropped one by one due to various health issues, extreme dry cough causing breathing issues from the very dry air. Also gastrointestinal bugs took some out. And physical injuries. A guy on our team passed away on the Lhotse Face. We had to take him back to camp 2 where his wife arranged for his removal in a helicopter. He laid wrapped in his sleeping bag for 2 days. Before the climb you have to check a box on what is to be done with your Carcass. I didn’t the money so checked the box to throw me in a crevasse. It was $3000 to take you lower and burn your body. As she mentioned the most dangerous place on the mountain is the Khumbu Icefall. It’s where most people are killed. The worst for me was the 6 day bout with diarrhea from a bug. Barley getting all my clothes off every ten minutes to spray the mountain. Then the occasional Cheyne Stokes Breathing at night. And the terrible headaches. What really I did not like is that the Icefall doctors and Sherpa do all the work. Setting ladders and the route. Carrying and setting tents. It’s not real climbing. It’s a tourist trap. She mentions Acclimatization. Going up and down. And that is how the expeditions do it. But many lone climbers leave base camp, summit and Return to base camp in one trip. It’s the latest thing. Speed climbing. I was there 5 weeks. Many now climb it in a day.

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Heading to camp 2
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Heading to camp 2

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp 3
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp 3

19-May-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp four and as high as I made it.
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Camp four and as high as I made it.

19-May-21
Eric, I doubt you have issues with mental toughness. Body building takes serious discipline and mental toughness. You’ll be fine.

From: Hancock West
19-May-21
Jay, how did the guy in your group pass away? was it the icefalls? wow. not sure i'd be cut out for this hunt

19-May-21
Matt, We think He had a sudden heart attack with no symptoms on the Lohtse face which is a steep 3000 foot wall of ice. I thought I was having a heart attack all the way up it.

A Sherpa Went back down to camp 2. got some adrenaline came back up and he was given adrenaline with CPR but it did not work. He seemed very healthy.

From: BowJangles
19-May-21
Holy hell Jay! You climbed Everest!! That's beyond bad ass.

From: Ambush
19-May-21
Eric, you're already more prepared than about ninety five percent of goat hunters are when they look up from the bottom. Prove it when you get there and the guides will be be willing to you where they wouldn't take ninety five percent of the other hunters. And that's where the monster Billy's live and die!!

I firmly believe that archery goat is the most attainable new WR.

19-May-21
My permit was only good to camp 4 that was my goal and as high as I could afford To go. Nepal charges a permit fee for each camp height on Everest. Most other peaks over there are empty and minimal permit fee. As I said Everest is a tourist trap.

From: t-roy
19-May-21
What was the elevation at Camp 4, Jay?

19-May-21
That year just over 26k

From: BowJangles
19-May-21
Rod, I was thinking that most folks go into this hunt with no training experience whatsoever. I see that as a leg up for myself. I'm hoping that the special kind of stubbornness I had when I willingly starving myself for shows and pushing myself for the last 4 weeks of a prep when I had literally no energy will be the same kind of stubbornness I have on the mountain.

From: Paul@thefort
19-May-21

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Get knee sleeves, you will thank me. They will keep the knees warmer and help hold the knee parts together especially when climbing or descending.

From: yeager
19-May-21
Good luck with you training and goat hunt..........remember, “the easy day was yesterday”!

From: Ambush
19-May-21
Pay no attention to Paul. I'm pretty sure he's Bionic.

20-May-21
Eric, I have the feeling You will be more prepared than 99.99% of the other hunters they get.

I agree with Ambush. That means they will be excited to get a client that can finally get to that spot where they think an 11” Goat is.

20-May-21
I do t know you or your body. I’m just saying that’s a light calorie regimen while being active. Watch for injuries

From: JL
20-May-21

JL's embedded Photo
JL's embedded Photo
I have a lot of respect for folks who can stick with a goat exercise plan. Numerous times I had to drop a lot of weight real fast for work. IME....you have to get your mind right in order to be successful. Once you do it the first time....the next times are fairly easy mentally.

Speaking of the Mt Everest thing being a tourist trap....I remember this photo being in the news a few years ago showing the crowded pathway going up. I give folks alot of credit for attempting the climb.....I could not do it these days.

From: Capra
20-May-21
I own a DEXA scanning company and see a lot of people with diet and exercise goals.

You are a big guy and I presume that you have your workouts as dialed in as your diet. I read that you are trying to cut 20 lbs. That should be no big deal BUT in my opinion you need more calories if you use your workout as your deficit you will have the same results or better than running a calorie deficit and workout deficit.

My data set is a cross section of people all with the similar goal and it is surprising who wins the challenges. It is always the people who have a balanced system not the cutters.

Get the hamskea 3rd axis leveler and practice steep shots if you can. GOOD LUCK !!

From: Jasper
20-May-21
Hip flexor weakness has been my Achilles heal on past hunts so I’m training specifically for my September caribou hunt. Google it and good luck!!!!

From: Mad Trapper
20-May-21
I hunted with Dennis twice. First trip I partially tore my Achilles tendon on the way in. Finished the hunt hobbled. Put three arrows in a goat, but didn't recover it. Watched Jake arrow one the first full day on the mountain. Second hunt, I arrowed a goat on the first full day on the mountain. Challenging hike from sea level to the alpine. Once on the alpine, not too bad. You can't do enough physical prep. When you think that you have done enough, do more. Dennis will get you a shot. Can't say enough good about him.

From: BowJangles
25-May-21
@Capra, the only way I can get this muscle off of me is to burn the candle at both ends. I can lose fat way easier than muscle. The extreme deficit is the only effective method for me and running this lean is a requisite for muscle loss. I will have cheat meals as needed to get my glycogen stores refilled. Other than the low calorie grind is in full effect.

25-May-21
Carrying too much muscle up the hills is a disadvantage. But not as much as carrying too much fat like must of us do :^)>

Another topic I’m sure your well aware of, is to train to your heart rate. Learn your resting , working and Maximum heart rates. Then when on the mountain stay under your max. Or don’t go above max too long. You will last longer day to day by wearing a heart rate monitor and following it.

Read this article. Runners World Heart rate training can make you faster. Here’s how

From: Medicinemann
25-May-21
Eric, Remember, you're starting this hunt at sea level. You will probably max out at a peak elevation of about 2,800-3,000 feet. Mad Trapper climbed to up to goat country on one and a half legs. It had nothing to do with his previous training. He simply refused to quit. Having met you in person, I know that you possess the exact same trait......Mental toughness...... and a positive attitude will pay big dividends as well. Learn the "rest step", continue shooting at various angles, enjoy the preparation process, embrace the anticipation, and start thinking of a gift for your wife (just before you tell her that you "need" a full mount, as well as a place to put it). I'd like to add one more point for you to consider.....everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. I did a LOT of shooting (uphill and downhill) before my 2008 sheep hunts. I never became as deadly accurate as I wished to be.....I was lethal....I shot with confidence.....but no shot was ever a slam dunk. I believe that it is more important to learn YOUR individual limitations, than it will be to try to meet other peoples established standards. One thing that I learned about myself after days (maybe even weeks of preparation), was that I simply didn't shoot that well when I had one foot higher than the other. I learned that even if my feet were close together (even touching), I shot significantly better than if my feet were spread apart, but at different elevations. THOSE are the types of findings that I suggest you try to identify. While the rest of the Bowsite community will be with you in spirit, only you and Dennis will be in goat country. Focus on adapting the hunt to your strengths while trying to avoid situations that require you to perform under less than optimum conditions for YOUR limitations....whether it be shooting in a strong cross wind, shooting with feet at different elevations, etc. Be sure to take a couple good books, in case you get weathered in.....oh, Dennis likes Crown Royal. Take a flask (if it suits you) for a celebratory drink when you have tagged your billy.

From: bigswivle
25-May-21
This thread is as close as I’ll ever get to a goat hunt. LOL. Good luck man.

From: BowJangles
25-May-21
@Jay, great advise on the heart rate monitor. I just ordered one. The sled training idea was pure gold. I've change my entire approach to this hunt from a training perspective. Cardio 4-5 days a week with very little gym time. Seems to be working.

@Jake, the rest step method has been super useful. Typically I only have one gear when it comes to training and it's pedal to the metal, full speed ahead. Learning to actually slow down is taking some getting used to but it's coming. I owe you some Mt Goat hotdogs! LOL. If I get one I'll have to bring some by.

I really appreciate all the responses fellas. You guys are awesome. Thank you!!

From: BigSkyHntr
25-May-21
Good luck, hope ya shoot a whopper!

From: Nick Muche
27-May-21
You’re going goat hunting, not climbing Everest. Bring a good attitude, decent physical shape and shoot well. Best of luck!

28-May-21
Of course your correct Nick. Your more versed in the terrain in that area of the world than I am.

But it sounds like a Eric has a lot of work out experience and enjoys the fitness lifestyle. So why not be 100% prepared. Or even over prepared. I doubt many guides say “I wish my client would have prepared less”

From: SDHNTR(home)
28-May-21
FYI, Dennis doesn’t go up the mountain himself much anymore. His guys do, while he stays in town for logistics.

From: BowJangles
29-May-21
@nick I treat everything I prepare for like I’m heading up Everest. Lol. I’ve got a bad habit of having the urge to over prepare or else I feel underprepared. Like Jay said I enjoy the fitness aspect so going balls-to-the-wall with the training is right up my alley. Plus this type of training is totally new to me so that makes it exciting as well.

I LOVE goats! Easily my favorite animal. I’ll be pure giddy with excitement when I get there so the attitude will definitely be cheery.

@Nate. I didn’t expect to hunt along side Dennis himself. If so that’ll be completely awesome. I’ve heard nothing but good things about his guides so either way I’ll be in good hands.

I still remember sitting in my apartment in Colorado Springs as a young Airman around ‘98-99 watching Dennis and Tom hunt for his goat. It’ll be super cool to meet him in person and shake his hand.

Hope y’all are having a great Memorial Day weekend!!

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