Moultrie Products
One Wheel Cart
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
KC9 26-May-21
cnelk 26-May-21
Lost Arra 26-May-21
Mule Power 26-May-21
Mule Power 26-May-21
Wild Bill 26-May-21
Rgiesey 26-May-21
JL 26-May-21
cnelk 26-May-21
skookumjt 26-May-21
JL 26-May-21
Wild Bill 26-May-21
midwest 26-May-21
Habitat 26-May-21
EMB 26-May-21
Paul@thefort 26-May-21
Scorpion 26-May-21
jcneng 26-May-21
Inshart 26-May-21
WYelkhunter 26-May-21
samman 26-May-21
Jaquomo 26-May-21
BULELK1 27-May-21
BULELK1 27-May-21
7mm08 27-May-21
Royboy 27-May-21
trophyhill 29-May-21
BTM 29-May-21
DonVathome 29-May-21
Rock 29-May-21
Paul@thefort 29-May-21
Mule Power 29-May-21
BULELK1 30-May-21
Mule Power 31-May-21
timbo 31-May-21
samman 31-May-21
Paul@thefort 31-May-21
Whocares 31-May-21
Paul@thefort 31-May-21
White Falcon 31-May-21
White Falcon 31-May-21
bpctcb 01-Jun-21
BULELK1 01-Jun-21
WV Mountaineer 01-Jun-21
Paul@thefort 01-Jun-21
Rut Nut 01-Jun-21
Cornpone 01-Jun-21
Paul@thefort 01-Jun-21
Paul@thefort 01-Jun-21
Rut Nut 02-Jun-21
ElkNut1 02-Jun-21
hdaman 02-Jun-21
From: KC9
26-May-21

KC9's embedded Photo
KC9's embedded Photo
Anyone with experience with these? Comments, Thoughts

From: cnelk
26-May-21

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
Those things are the biggest pieces of sh!t ever made. The handles are usual made too high causing shoulder/arm fatigue while using.

I used one back in ‘06 and damn near left it in the brush.

May as well get to know how to quarter an elk up, and have a good pack.

From: Lost Arra
26-May-21
That's my kind of review. Thanks cnelk! I assume you aren't on the Single Wheel pro staff.

From: Mule Power
26-May-21

Mule Power's embedded Photo
Mule Power's embedded Photo
The handles on this one swivel so you can set them high and low. Going uphill the guy in front sets his high and the rear ones go low. But make no mistake anything but the easiest trail will be tough. They work best on gated roads. You better be in good shape! They don’t make life much easier they just give you the ability, in some situations, to make one big trip instead of two smaller ones. Just add work!

From: Mule Power
26-May-21
Two days later we packed an entire 6 point bull out just under two miles on a horse trail . Mostly downhill. I would have much rather had a good frame pack.

From: Wild Bill
26-May-21
Leverage looks great, but, top heavy torque, weight above the axle, will beat you down.

From: Rgiesey
26-May-21
Packed one bull in 08. Borrowed one with a motorcycle front wheel hub and tire. Tire went flat. One trip a couple miles uphill out of a decent canyon with help from someone who wasn’t much help. Hard work but way better than a pack frame. Whole bull in one shot.

From: JL
26-May-21
I wonder if a two-wheeled cart of similar narrow design would offer better stability?

From: cnelk
26-May-21
As a Beta test - Go get yourself a wheelbarrow - load it up with 150lbs, go for a 2-3 mile walk and find out for yourself if you like the design of a 'One Wheel Cart'

From: skookumjt
26-May-21
I've used a DIY one wheeled cart many times in MT and ID and it was nothing short of awesome. Two guys could easily get a mature bull up and down any game trail. Faster, less fatiguing, and less field processing.

From: JL
26-May-21

JL's embedded Photo
JL's embedded Photo
The Neet Kart is a two-wheeled design but I was thinking the wheels would be side by side.

From: Wild Bill
26-May-21
cnelk, The wheelbarrow has a different leverage with the weight pivoted at the axle in both the vertical and horizontal planes.

Skookumjt, You're right two guys make that one wheel cart much more manageable.

JL, Two wheels widen the base, but the side tipping point has to be lowered to benefit the improvement. The two wheel type would improve drastically if all the weight were between the wheels and lower to the axle.

From: midwest
26-May-21
Get one with a motor on it like BULELK1!

From: Habitat
26-May-21
Alot of the gated roads are in areas that don't allow any wheeled items so keep that in mind

From: EMB
26-May-21
Nope. Top heavy and side to side balancing act will wear you out. I'd rather use a pack frame and make several trips or another cart altogether.

From: Paul@thefort
26-May-21

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
deboned bagged-meat hauler
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
deboned bagged-meat hauler
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
works on trails and cross country if not too many blowdown trees, Not up hill but have taken it uphill to bring down load. Two trips for a bull elk.
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
works on trails and cross country if not too many blowdown trees, Not up hill but have taken it uphill to bring down load. Two trips for a bull elk.

From: Scorpion
26-May-21

Scorpion's embedded Photo
Crossing a beaver dam with turkey gear
Scorpion's embedded Photo
Crossing a beaver dam with turkey gear
I've been using one like Paul shows for years. I found the plans on here a loooong time ago. I've used it to haul, elk, deer and waterfowl decoy spreads and it works great and is very maneuverable. If doing heavy loads, I use a heavy duty strap that attaches to each handle and loop across your shoulders to take of the strain off your arms and hands. It's a very versatile device. Pic using it this year to haul in our turkey gear in Nebraska.

From: jcneng
26-May-21
I owned one just like it for several years, they are made in Ft. Collins by Cycle Tote. I concur with the above, with a flat dirt road maybe it is advantageous. Typically more trips with a pack would be easier. Two of us almost killed ourselves trying to take out a cow, downhill, whole over a 1/2 mile. Not fun and dangerous.

From: Inshart
26-May-21
I've had the 2 wheel (side by side, wheels are about 24" apart) cart from Cabela's for many years. Take it every year, only used it a few times. The best was about 3 years ago, I shot a nice cow quite a ways back in. My partner and I pack framed it to the edge of an old clear cut and then used the cart from there - worked great on the two-track - through the woods it's a LOT more work than it's worth.

From: WYelkhunter
26-May-21
Carts are like any other piece of equipment. Used properly and in the correct situations they are great. I have a cabelas cart that I modified so both tires are side by side like a wide 1 wheel cart. It works great for 1 or 2 people in the right situation. A 2 wheeled wide base cart won't work any where I have hunted. I also have one similar to the one in the original post. It works great for 2 people (I would never try and use it by my self) in the correct situations.

From: samman
26-May-21
I have one like Pauls as well, but I modifed it to hook to a pack frame. Takes the strain off your neck with the strap & you can go hands free even. I'll have to dig up a picture of it to post.

From: Jaquomo
26-May-21
Habitat, I'm not aware of any gated roads on National Forest or BLM that prohibit wheeled carts or bicycles. Can you offer an example?

From: BULELK1
27-May-21

BULELK1's embedded Photo
BULELK1's embedded Photo
My e-Pack is single wheel.......

Good luck, Robb

From: BULELK1
27-May-21

BULELK1's embedded Photo
BULELK1's embedded Photo
This one is still my Go-To-single wheel

I can leapfrog a load of meat and then the head and cape

Home made in my garage years and years ago

Good luck, Robb

From: 7mm08
27-May-21
We used one on an elk hunt where we packed in several miles. NEVER AGAIN!!! We dumped the load several times, no matter how well it was cinched. Was worse than just packing on your back. It was pretty rough country, but was a battle just to keep it steady.

From: Royboy
27-May-21

Royboy 's embedded Photo
Royboy 's embedded Photo
We used to use a old Cannondale trailer that was hard plastic and we put no-flat tires on it. It would haul half an elk and not tippy

29-May-21
You’ll be better off humping your kill out on your back. rocks and deadfall make using a cart more work than it’s worth. Hard on the shoulder sockets too

From: BTM
29-May-21
Agree with what trophyhill just said. On a smooth, level trail, however, one might be OK. Like any tool, you must use the right one for the conditions.

From: DonVathome
29-May-21
2 wheel carts are significantly better. I would rather backpack my elk out then use a single wheel. A 2 wheel is GREAT but only if you have flat or slight downhill - and brakes. And a trail or open area. When there is a trail it is AMAZING.

From: Rock
29-May-21
I built a single wheel cart many years ago and have used it a few times mostly for Deer and Antelope, also Turkeys a few times. It works great for mostly flat or rolling hilly ground but not sure how well it would do in the mountains. A 2 wheel cart would not work on steep sidehills without a trail.

From: Paul@thefort
29-May-21
I have seen hunters struggle with a two wheeled cart on a narrow horse trail. Usually one wheel is on the trial and the other is in the brush.

From: Mule Power
29-May-21
Two wheeled carts are for whitetail hunters. Elk country doesn’t have a use for those other than gated roads. Nothing wrong with Cabelas Super Mag Hauler for deer. For elk the one I have pictured which I believe is the same one as BullElks is as good as it gets. But like many mentioned only in the right conditions and it’s still work. Yes.... you will wreck! Use ratchet straps to make sure everything stays put even when the shit is hitting the fan. Oh the memories! Lol

From: BULELK1
30-May-21
+1 Paul@ & Joe,

Those two wheel carts are challenging in the sagebrush/rocks and game trails.

At least with the single wheel you have more control going around and thru most anything.

I backpack meat to the cart, load and Roll out..

My hand/leg powered Single Wheel has a 28 inch tire, and hand break so I go over so much brush, rocks and steep trail terrain, no biggy.

Good luck, Robb

From: Mule Power
31-May-21
A 2 wheeler rolls over way more than a single wheel. I’ve used both... a lot.

From: timbo
31-May-21
KC9, Just looking at the cart makes my gut ache bringing back forgotten memories. The center of gravity appears too high, the handles too short providing too little leverage and making the cart way too tipsy. I liked the design as shown in the pictures of Paul@thefort.

From: samman
31-May-21

samman's embedded Photo
samman's embedded Photo
samman's embedded Photo
samman's embedded Photo
Finally tracked down my pictures. Since this time (2007) I have upgraded my pack frame & added a center bar to prevent the smaller deer from falling through. This is my daughter hooked up to her deer.

From: Paul@thefort
31-May-21

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
I have added a cargo net over the supports to prevent items falling out. THis cart was the original from Cabelas. I made another 1 foot longer. I have a 'how to' list if interested
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
I have added a cargo net over the supports to prevent items falling out. THis cart was the original from Cabelas. I made another 1 foot longer. I have a 'how to' list if interested

From: Whocares
31-May-21
Who's the young guy modeling your cart, Paul? (somebody hadda ask)

From: Paul@thefort
31-May-21
Hey Chuck, time flies by. Picture, 2002, God! 19 years ago and I was only 62 years. Still having fun.

From: White Falcon
31-May-21

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo
With all 3 sections of the ladder stand it will be up 18 ft. Easy to pull.

From: White Falcon
31-May-21

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo

From: bpctcb
01-Jun-21
I built one like Paul’s and I love it. I attach it to the molle webbing on my Kifaru pack belt via carabiners & S-hooks to keep the weight off my neck since I’ve had a C5-6-7 fusion. If I need to disconnect in a hurry it’s just a matter of lifting the carabiners up & off the S-hooks then drop it which pretty much instantly stops it from rolling any further.

BP

From: BULELK1
01-Jun-21

BULELK1's embedded Photo
BULELK1's embedded Photo
Using my Single wheel and my pack frame, 1 trip out with 1 load on a cow elk.

Long day from early AM harvest bone off the meat head down to the truck, change pack's out and get the single wheel cart and wood saw for down trees along the trail to backpack meat down to the cart, pack off the mountain before dark.

Good looking carts Fella's.

Paul, I went to that style after having a 2 wheel one. After a year or two, I added straps to the handles that went over my shoulders to help with the load.

Good luck, Robb

01-Jun-21
I’ve used both. Two wheeled carts are awesome as long as the surface is wide enough to keep both wheels stable. Which in the woods is hard to find. However, if you can get the meat to a wide Trail you are golden as ling as the trail is wide enough.

One wheeled is more work but, can go places two wheels can’t. And, they don’t tip as much. Tipping may not sound like a big deal. But, if you have a two wheeled cart on a marginal surface, you’ll realize it is a huge deal. Between constant struggle to keep it up right plus the occasional tip, it’s a lot more work then it’s worth.

I think these realities have been stated by guys who have used both. But, don’t let anyone convince you differently. If you have the surface area use a two wheeled cart. A single wheeled cart is handy. But, it’s still a lot of work. In my mind, the only thing that makes a cart a valuable tool is the terrain consideration. Without proper surface areas to use one, pack the animal out. It’ll be easier. I promise.

From: Paul@thefort
01-Jun-21
Justin. Yep!

From: Rut Nut
01-Jun-21
Paul- where'd you find those fancy hiking boots?! ;-)

From: Cornpone
01-Jun-21
I made one many years ago very similar to the one Paul@thefort shows above. It only puts approximately half the load on your shoulders via the strap. It has served me well.

From: Paul@thefort
01-Jun-21
Hey Perry, how do you think I can get archery close so many times!

From: Paul@thefort
01-Jun-21

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Parts and lengths of one in alum sq tube for game cart.

Main supports for V cart

Quantity

2 40 in upper reach 2 48in lower reach Allow a 8 in over lap when attaching the upper and lower reach. Use two bolts and nuts/lock washers per side. Upper reach will be placed on top when the two pieces attach.

Cross braces:

Upper, 21in. in length and mount 21 in. from the top uses one bolt and nut. Attach underneath of side rails Lower, 11 in. in length, for the bottom, place on the upper side of side rail and attach with one bolt and nut. Keep lower cross brace at least one in. from tire…both of the ends of the cross braces can be trimmed and filed smooth.

Wheel bracket. Made from 3in, 90degree alum stock and cut three inch wide. Drill, axle hole centered and 1 ¾ in from the bottom angle and then clamp the bracket on the wheel. Notice that the side rails will ride below the axle. Attach the upper cross brace first to get the correct width at the top and then clamp the wheel bracket to the side rail to assure proper bolt placement. Once attached, the part of the bracket that extends over the side rail can be trimmed off. Also, the upped part of the bracket and above the axle hole can be rounded off.

Lower bend in side rail. Measure 9 ½ in from bottom of the side rail and then bend up lower reach side rail, 4 in. This bend will help keep the center of gravity lower.

Wheel and tire. Use a 20 in tire and wheel. I purchased the tire and tube and Wal-Mart and the wheel, used, at a local bike shop. Add green tire sealer or purchase a tire with the green sealer in it. There are thicker tubes available which I did use. I replace the tire and tube every 2-3 years.

You now have the basic cart. You can attach nylon strapping down the middle and across the carts side rails to form a sort of cargo netting to help hold the load. I purchased a heavy duty netting and placed it over the nylon strapping for extra support. Army surplus store had netting and nylon straps of various sizes. I attached the netting via electrical ties. I attached the nylon straps to the side rails via a nut, washer and bolt after rapping the straps totally around the 1in side rail. Leave a little slack in the strips about an inch or to, to create the bed.

Neck strap. Nylon strap of 3 inch, cut to proper length and bolted to upper side rail. Neck strap and hand hold the load while traveling.

Total cost of materials plus bending of stock. About $130. 00/

Attached pictures of cart. Paul

From: Rut Nut
02-Jun-21
Oh, OK- "stalking shoes".............................now I get it Paul! : )

From: ElkNut1
02-Jun-21
Some great looking carts there! I sure wish I hunted country where they could be utilized. Good stuff guys!

ElkNut

From: hdaman
02-Jun-21
Thanks Paul, excellent detail!

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