Moultrie Products
Best Practices?
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Twinetickler 07-Jul-21
Twinetickler 07-Jul-21
nthegun 08-Jul-21
MA-PAdeerslayer 08-Jul-21
great white 08-Jul-21
GBTG 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
elkmtngear 08-Jul-21
Twinetickler 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
Twinetickler 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
IdyllwildArcher 08-Jul-21
bowhunt 08-Jul-21
lv2bohunt 08-Jul-21
lv2bohunt 08-Jul-21
JohnMC 08-Jul-21
Twinetickler 08-Jul-21
Whocares 08-Jul-21
Wild Bill 08-Jul-21
Twinetickler 08-Jul-21
jordanathome 08-Jul-21
bowhunt 08-Jul-21
ki-ke 08-Jul-21
320 bull 09-Jul-21
Twinetickler 09-Jul-21
welka 11-Jul-21
IdyllwildArcher 11-Jul-21
From: Twinetickler
07-Jul-21
I've gleaned a lot of info over the years from you all. Like how to tie my boots so they don't come untied, camp hacks etc. These threads are fun and informational. Anymore gems to share as we all get ready for September? Gear wise, food, can't live withouts?

From: Twinetickler
07-Jul-21
I'll share one my Dad recently learned from his good buddy while bear hunting. Hanging your treestand can be made much easier by putting in a tree step above where you want your stand, then hanging it from a ratchet strap. This will free up both hands and you won't have to fight your stand while hanging it. Once the stand is in place you can use ratchet strap to solidify the stand. So simple, but for years I have fought my stand, hanging it with one hand, biting the nylon strap, nearly falling out. It never crossed my mind to use a tree step and ratchet strap to help. You all probably already do this. I'm a little slow.

From: nthegun
08-Jul-21

nthegun's Link
and the footwear stood equipped to be used upon the desk. this become long before dawn; and then they bustled away as short as lightning. voip phone system service provider

08-Jul-21
For stands when hanging alone (which I know isn’t smart) i climb up, strew in a peg with a pulley, climb down and pull stand up, tie it off to peg on bottom climb up, keep straped in to my linesman’s and hang the stand. 0 fight what so ever. Little work climbing up and down but beats climbing up with a stand in your hands and fighting it. And I always ratchet my stands. I never just trust the one strap they give you.

From: great white
08-Jul-21

From: GBTG
08-Jul-21
On my tree stands I have a 12 inch loop of 1/4 shock cord tied around the upper part of the stand near the seat. I climb to the tree stand height and install a small screw in bow holder just above where the stand will be. I then hang my stand from the shock cord and I don't have to fight the stand weight as I attach the stand in the exact spot I want it. Remove the bow holder hook and your good to go.

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21
Make sure you store your expensive boots in a cool dry place, and pull them out the wear occasionally so the glue holding the sole to the boot does not dry out and rot........it is no fun walking out of the soles of your boots 2 miles back from the truck......and shoe goo is kinda hard to use back in the woods to reattach the soles once they separate from the boot......easy to get lots of debris mixed in there. I wouldn't know this personally of course. Pretty expensive mistake to make that I never anticipated.

I like to eat my big meal of the day at mid-day. That way at the end of the day I am not fumbling around in the dark, trying to boil water, rehydrate a meal, and choke it down so I can hit the hay before 10 pm and get some real rest. I hate the end of day rush to tend to gear for overnight, and eat a hot meal, and watching the clock cutting into my time to rest before the dawn of the next day. I prefer to do a lighter meal of ready to eat items that do not require boiling water, rehydrating, etc. I just want my nightcap and zzzzzzzzz's.

If you shit in the woods, keep it to yourself. No one appreciates bathroom humor anymore.

From: elkmtngear
08-Jul-21
Manscape, baby wipes, and a wide mouth gatorade bottle within reach of your sleeping bag.

I'll just leave it at that...

From: Twinetickler
08-Jul-21
Good stuff so far! I've been messing with my calls looking for an easy, good sounding calf/cow call. I keep coming back to the Primos Cash Cow. I've also been using Liquid IV for hydration on hot, sweaty days. I've liked it so far, easy single packs to put in my nalgene bottle.

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21
I've used this for years with great success....only issue is it can get gummed up with spit/chew. Then you have to clean off the reed.....which I can usually do in the moment by running the dry edge of a shirt sleeve or tail between the reed and call body and blowing across the side of the reed lightly. They made a smaller calf call as well. Skeery elk call.

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21
ACE-1 Special Elk Call ACE-1 #00263 “The most effective cow/calf call ever made, invented, and produced.”

Fitted with a tough voice unit, tapered reed and bite band, it works better than ever for both volume and pitch control. This super easy-to-use call mimics both cow and calf to bring big bulls running! Lanyard included.

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21

From: Twinetickler
08-Jul-21
Nice! I had one of those years ago and lost it on the mountain. I remember it being easy to use. Might have to pick one up. Thanks for the reminder!

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21

jordanathome's embedded Photo
jordanathome's embedded Photo

08-Jul-21
Clip your toenails a week before your hunt. You don't want them long while hiking a lot and you don't want them freshly cut so that they're sharp either.

Wear your boots 1/2 day 4 times a week for the 3 months leading up to your hunt and your feet will be used to them on day 1 of your hunt. It doesn't matter if your boots are broken in - if you haven't worn them in 11 months and wear comfortable shoes year-round, your feet aren't ready for several miles a day in boots.

Most forms of pepperoni don't need refrigeration. Pepperoni is good when you're not hunting; it's really good on day 7 of a hunt when you've been eating freeze-dried meals. I bury my stinky food a foot under ground where I first lift up a big rock. I then replace the rock. Never had a bear get my buried food.

You can make a roll of toilet paper last for weeks if you start with rocks and sticks and finish with the TP. Barkless 3/4 inch sticks work great, as do soft river stones.

From: bowhunt
08-Jul-21
Having a cheap pair of flip flops on back packing trips are really nice to have.

I had never thought about it until I went on a 4 day trip and a new friend I had never hunted with pulled his out and put them on when we got out to our spike camp. I think I’ve had flip flops with me every since. Feels good to air the feet out after a long hike and they weigh next to nothing.

From: lv2bohunt
08-Jul-21
Idyll for the win!

“Barkless sticks and river rocks” Now that is country

From: lv2bohunt
08-Jul-21

From: JohnMC
08-Jul-21

JohnMC's Link
Idyll I am not sure if that is a joke or if you are serious but I always have room for plenty of TP in my pack.

With that said I have a buddy that carries a portable bidet when he hunts. The Culo Clean. Stupidest thing I have ever seen. You can see it in the link.

From: Twinetickler
08-Jul-21
Haha that bidet is awesome! I might invest, nothing worse than hiking around with chafed butt cheeks.

From: Whocares
08-Jul-21
Ok. Jordan - I agree if it works "big meal" at noon, like in camp or packing your Mtn house and Jet boil along for the day. Need mid day break anyway. And back in camp at night something light and relaxing cocktail the best, I'm usually spiked so works great. And oh, you mentioned calls, shouldn't even share this but REEL cow call should be illegal.

Idyll, almost more important to clip your girlfriends toenails a week before you leave. Don't ask me how I know. If you're married the above doesn't apply, obviously. And the TP deal, if i had time I'd do a video on how to use one single sheet of TP. Maybe I'll do this in my spare time.

From: Wild Bill
08-Jul-21
Chafed butt cheeks? In that case you need butt butter as used by cyclists, you know, those skinny seats can rub areas not meant to be rubbed, other than a wipe clean.

From: Twinetickler
08-Jul-21
I picked up a backpacking cot and chair that have been great in the backcountry camp. I like the flip-flops idea too. I have a Sawyer water filter. It works but is slow. What are you all running for a filter?

From: jordanathome
08-Jul-21
Holy SHITE Ike......rocks and sticks to scape off the first layer followed by a tp chaser........Hell to the NO. LOLOLOLOL

I like a nice wet nappy for my chaser wipe. Gotta keep the popo clean and happy.

Hell yeah to the crocs or flip flops for camp. The dogs need a rest and fresh air after a day in boots.

#1 issue for me is water. I want a plan, a solid plan, for water in the woods. I use alot. Maybe more than I should. But if I have one comfort need it is clean cold water. So I make sure I have a filter, maybe a pump and a gravity filter, and a back up of filtration tabs. Nothing ruins my mental health and desire to persist than being hot and thirsty with no ready solution.

Food variety and caloric value. I want a variety of foods. Some need rehydration and heating. Some as ready to eat. Some salty, some sweet, some chewy, some not. Really cheers me up if I have choices when hunger hits......on the trail or in camp. And I want as much bang caloric-ally as I can get from each food choice. And weight is a prime consideration when looking for that balance. Peanut butter is awesome but I don't want to pack the weight of Skippy in a jar 2 miles back to camp.

Always, always have rain gear and something to keep you warm no matter where you are....in camp, on the trail, sitting in ambush. I've had too many situations in CO where it was sunny and 80F one minute then clouds show up, wind picks up, temp drops, rain, sleet, snow falls, and if you aren't ready you are looking at hypothermia post haste. A silnylon tarp, hooded waterproof jacket, and a neck gaiter or other warm head gear are always in my pack. Plus the tarp doubles as a place to toss meat as you break down a carcass and keep it relatively clean.......yes I have used it to help buddies with elk they killed even if I have yet to use it for my own elk hill. haters.

From: bowhunt
08-Jul-21
I started out using the MSR Sweeteater pump over 20 years ago. They are compact and pretty light, but I had issues with them failing on me . It really sucks to have your water filter fail in the middle of a backpack trip. I switched over to a katadyn hiker pro after that. I have been really happy with that water pump. Zero issues with tons of use, and it pumps water faster than the MSR. They are a little bit larger and heavier than the MSR, but the reliability is worth it to me.

If I know for sure I’ll be somewhere with larger pools of water the katadyn 6 liter gravity camp filter is really nice. Fill it up , hang in a tree, and get water whenever you need to refill it. Several of the spike camps I use only have a tiny spring we pump water from and the gravity camp filter won’t work there.

I tried the sawyer squeeze and didn’t rally like it. It seemed like the places that it would work well, I could just use the katadyn 6liter gravity camp filter.

From: ki-ke
08-Jul-21
Hard pass on the Culo Clean, but the menstrual cup that same company offers on their website would have come in handy for a couple ex hunting buddies....

From: 320 bull
09-Jul-21
Much of this is probably widely used but here are a few of mine. I use pillow cases for meat sacks and 1 filled with my down vest makes a great pillow. Always carry 4 sacks or enough t o do an entire elk between the hunting group. A small square piece of tyvek makes a great drop cloth for break time keeps your stuff out of the dirt. When breaking down an elk take 5 minutes to lash a small tree to a couple of tree trunks horizontally about 5 or 6 feet off the ground. lash the quarters to it and put the game bag on the ground under it. Keeps you upright when boning and makes it a 1 man job. Pack a boning knife inside of a cut proof glove and a meat hook. My hunting knife has a small saw on it that can be used to cut off antlers. That head weighs allot if your not doing a euro its a waste to carry it. Duck tape around a bic and over the business end is a great way to store some tape and keep a back up waterproof lighter on hand. I always carry athletic tape for hot spots on the feet. It can be a life saver. Tie a piece of flagging tape on your release and always look around on the ground after a break. I don't buy camo or green stuff that goes in a pocket or pack I try and buy orange stuff. Headlamp knife ect. A pair of safety glasses for those that don't wear glasses already can save your eyes if you have to bush whack in the dark packing meat. For main camp I put a tote in the bottom of the freezer and fill it with water. Freeze it up before you leave home and you can use the freezer like a fridge. Running it for an hour or so every few days on the genny will keep the ice frozen. We like to freeze meals like lasagna, shepards pie, chili type stuff and bring them from home. We use a small microwave to heat them up. Makes life really easy for those nights at main camp. Whats for dinner is whats the most thawed. I welded a hasp for a lock on the freezer. Keeps the bears out. Coming from MI I don't pack stuff I might use. Less is more for me and I can live without allot. Everything has to be packed and unpacked at least twice and keeping it light makes for allot less work. When you get where your going if there are other camps around stop and ask them if they have had any bears tear up their camp. If they say yes just leave that bugger will get yours sooner or later. Especially if near a campground. Great timing for a great thread

From: Twinetickler
09-Jul-21
Great stuff 320! Tape around the Bic is a great idea. I also throw in a couple of those big Costco lawn garbage bags to put quarters in, and keep pack clean. They also make great dry bags if you don't have a ton of room in your tent.

From: welka
11-Jul-21
Resinol for the chaffing is always a must when down in AZ/NM with the heat! Also don't forget tiny, little container (like size of a thimble) of tooth cap paste. It's a major b___ if you chip a tooth and still have 5 days to hunt!

11-Jul-21
Dead serious about the sticks and rocks. Once you've done it a bunch of times, it's no big deal and saves a lot of room in the pack. I'll be on my sheep hunt in August for up to 3 weeks possibly. I'll be bringing 1 roll of TP and I bet 1/2 of it will come home with me unless I use it for fire starter.

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