Moultrie Products
Half days?
Pronghorn
Contributors to this thread:
Korey Wolfe 11-Aug-21
JohnMC 11-Aug-21
Deertick 11-Aug-21
Rickm 11-Aug-21
[email protected] 11-Aug-21
Korey Wolfe 12-Aug-21
Buckeye 12-Aug-21
Korey Wolfe 12-Aug-21
HiMtnHnter 12-Aug-21
ahunter76 12-Aug-21
JohnMC 12-Aug-21
Tilzbow 12-Aug-21
JTreeman 12-Aug-21
jdee 12-Aug-21
Ermine 12-Aug-21
Korey Wolfe 15-Aug-21
Korey Wolfe 15-Aug-21
JohnMC 15-Aug-21
From: Korey Wolfe
11-Aug-21
I will be hunting water for the Wyoming opener with my mother and daughter. I believe all day in a blind will be a bit much for them, but I know that's how we are going to start out our hunts. So my question is if by the second or third day of 14 hours in the blind we decide to take a break, does it make sense to come back for an evening hunt or the last 3-4 hours of the day? The antelope will mostly be able to see us enter and exit the blind and I assume they will be leery if they see us go into the blind.

From: JohnMC
11-Aug-21
If you find a tank that you sneak into without being seen would be much better. If you can't especially if there ranching activity or oil and gas near by I would drive them to tank and then drive out. I think trucks don't bother much in areas they see them regularly and will be better than walking in.

From: Deertick
11-Aug-21
Never had much trouble just walking in there ... they watch, and then they seem to forget. YMMV ... but that's my experience. The truck idea is a good compromise. That said ... it depends on density. Where I hunt, there are enough antelope that there are always some coming from some direction to my watering hole. With really low densities (and that may be an issue this year in my area!), you may need to be sneakier.

From: Rickm
11-Aug-21
May just want to think about hunting the hottest midday hours if they burn out. Some lopes may see you and remember but many have short memories and or won't see you? We used to kill lopes at fence crossings with a 4x8 piece of plywood for cover. They would see us walk in but once we dissappeard for an hour they would cross.

11-Aug-21

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
While hunting Pronghorn in Colorado over the past 20 years, most of my action was prior to 3 pm. 8 am to 2 pm seemed to be prime time even though I did stay to dark on most days.

From: Korey Wolfe
12-Aug-21
Thanks everyone. We are hunting near a water hole right next to alfalfa so I can see how getting in earlier is better. We had most of our action before noon last year, but that was late September.

I do have one spot that I may try that isn't near the alfalfa but its walk in and it's likely a 30-40 minute walk...for an antelope! lol

From: Buckeye
12-Aug-21
Kill one early and yall wont have to sit so long in a hot blind! Good Luck Korey

From: Korey Wolfe
12-Aug-21
Buckeye, that sounds like a great plan!!

From: HiMtnHnter
12-Aug-21
I have found first thing in the morning fairly active, mid morning, early afternoon. I haven't found evening to be as productive.

From: ahunter76
12-Aug-21
5 trips & 4 different areas. Next to no activity after 3pm. Couple times left at 4.. If it's dry like here you should be done by 2nd 3rd day. Good Luck & enjoy..

From: JohnMC
12-Aug-21

JohnMC's embedded Photo
JohnMC's embedded Photo
That one was after 6:30 PM last year, and I know I kill another late enough it was dark soon after I killed him. Kill one in the first hour before too.

From: Tilzbow
12-Aug-21
Antelope can’t count. If three peeps walk to a blind and one walks away they’ll still come in. I also agree with a previous post about dropping peeps off via truck. They don’t seem too concerned about trucks at water holes for short periods of time.

From: JTreeman
12-Aug-21
I’ve only killed one pronghorn in my life, and he came to water in the last 45 min of the day. After an all day sit. I think they can come any time, but obviously some times are more productive.

—Jim

From: jdee
12-Aug-21
Here in NM it is hot in August and miserable sitting in 90 degree weather so I always get in early and stay until it gets too hot then come back around 3:00 - 3:30 until dark. I’ve seen them grazing 3 - 400 yards away as I’m walking to the blind then watch them work their way to the water a little later.

From: Ermine
12-Aug-21
When I used to waterhole hunt a lot. I would sit from dark until dark. I’ve had a buck water at 6:30 am.

With that said Ive seen a lot of antelope water in the evening and right at dark

I used to think mid day was key. And I would Quit hunting. It wasn’t until I observed a very large buck watering right at dusk before I figured out that they can water at anytime and often evening was good.

From: Korey Wolfe
15-Aug-21
In the blind now. Mom almost got a shot at nice buck but he wouldn’t commit to the water because of a young coyote. We eventually tried to get a shot out of the back of the blind but he saw me take the window down. We can see the next water hole and there are 10 lope on it. A mile away!

From: Korey Wolfe
15-Aug-21
I hunted here with my daughter last year and my estimate is that the herd was reduced by 75% or more with the winter storm. It is very dry and the water holes are active, but the numbers are terribly low. Way less targets than last year. I just hope my mom has a good hunt.

From: JohnMC
15-Aug-21
9:30 this morning! Short season!!

  • Sitka Gear