Moultrie Products
Really Cool Video
cougar
Contributors to this thread:
Rocky D 12-Aug-21
Inshart 12-Aug-21
Rocky D 12-Aug-21
Potro 12-Aug-21
Matt 12-Aug-21
Bowboy 12-Aug-21
wkochevar 12-Aug-21
smarba 12-Aug-21
BOWNBIRDHNTR 12-Aug-21
JohnMC 12-Aug-21
t-roy 12-Aug-21
Medicinemann 12-Aug-21
[email protected] 12-Aug-21
BUCKeye 12-Aug-21
Rickm 12-Aug-21
JohnMC 12-Aug-21
T Mac 12-Aug-21
Rocky D 12-Aug-21
Empty Freezer 12-Aug-21
midwest 13-Aug-21
Slate 13-Aug-21
TJS 13-Aug-21
Papadeerhtr 18-Aug-21
2Wild Bill 18-Aug-21
Two Feathers 18-Aug-21
LBshooter 18-Aug-21
LBshooter 18-Aug-21
Rocky D 19-Aug-21
MOutside 29-Aug-21
Zbone 30-Aug-21
wvfarrier 30-Aug-21
From: Rocky D
12-Aug-21

Rocky D's Link
I really enjoyed this video.

From: Inshart
12-Aug-21
Cool video, Really enjoyed it without music playing - nice to hear critters making natural sounds.

From: Rocky D
12-Aug-21
Absolutely agree, an amazing variety of wildlife!

12-Aug-21
Very cool. I agree with the natural sounds. No music or non stop dork whispering

From: Potro
12-Aug-21
very nice video

From: Matt
12-Aug-21
Really cool video, thanks for posting.

From: Bowboy
12-Aug-21
He's lucky those bears didn't destroy his camera.

From: wkochevar
12-Aug-21
So if there is no one in the woods to hear it, does a drinking Mt Lion actually make slurping sounds?? ;-) lol

From: smarba
12-Aug-21
I thought the same thing Bowboy: I've rarely had a bear ignore a camera. For that main reason I always lock mine in a metal "bear safe" box and even still, they'll often lick it, rub on it and generally try to mess with it. Before going to metal safes in almost every case of a camera being deployed for a relatively long time bears would bat it around, tear the strap, chew on it, etc.

From: BOWNBIRDHNTR
12-Aug-21
VERY cool video. No music and no human voices made it even better!

From: JohnMC
12-Aug-21
That was fun to watch. Also a lesson there when sitting waterholes. Stay all day, lot of midday activity.

From: t-roy
12-Aug-21
Pretty cool. I wonder if the rest of the critters drinking there, think the water has a bit of a bear flavor to it…

From: Medicinemann
12-Aug-21
At 9:38, for a split second, I thought that it looked like a honey badger instead of a western Skunk.

12-Aug-21
Cool trail camera pictures and thanks for sharing that. What came to my mind was the story I wrote concerning a similar water pool in Arizona. Part of the story follows. Arizona-- The young Apache hunter named Steps Between Stones, who had seen sixteen cycles of the 12 moon months, sunk low in his hiding place. The day was very hot so he only had on his breechcloth/leggings and moccasins; his dark skin and black long hair blended in well with the surrounding brown sand, gray rocks and sticker brush and a few green cactus plants. It had been so dry in the region he was lucky to find this water seep high up in the rocky hills, and around it were a few small deer prints in the sand. He had greased his upper body with animal fat to cut the human smell. His mother had made him a mask made from a deer's head but it was too hot to wear this day. He kept low as the sun was setting and at long last a cool shadow was being cast across the seep and his hiding spot.

He doubted he would hear these small deer coming to water as they were fine in structure, gray in color, silent on the hoof, and as he was told, came and went like the smoke of a dying camp fire or like a Gray Ghost that might be here one second and then gone the next.

His left hand held his favorite bow made of Mesquite wood and strung with deer back sinew. His father had given him this bow along with a quiver of chert stone point arrows with black Raven feathers. He had tried to make his own stone points but just needed more time to acquire the skill. His uncle was the stone point master and also made a few Obsidian blade knives. Scars on Steps Between Stone's fingers were a testimony to this as he tried to see if the knife was sharp enough. He wore this very special knife on his belt as he just knew it would bring him luck this day.

It was becoming darker and cooler and as he raised his head over the rocks, he saw movement ahead and approaching the small ring of water just a few strides ahead, a gray deer approached with caution, head up smelling the wind for danger. The young hunter froze as the deer approached and when the deer's head was at the water, he slowly pulled back on the bow and released the arrow. The Great Spirit guided the arrow into the deer's heart and while a fatal hit, the deer turned and bounded out of sight.

From: BUCKeye
12-Aug-21
Surprised that first bear never even took a drink. That cat had to walk away with a sloshing belly full.

From: Rickm
12-Aug-21
I am surprised the first bear never really had a drink. I may have missed it. Cool video.

From: JohnMC
12-Aug-21
The first bear was wet when it started so I think there might be some of him at the water we did not see.

From: T Mac
12-Aug-21
Excellent footage thanks for sharing.

From: Rocky D
12-Aug-21
Paul, I thought their for a moment that I was reading from a Louis L’Amour.

12-Aug-21
Alot of predators and a few prey.. Alot of critters out in the middle of the day. 115 is a bit toastie. Absolutely amazing video.

From: midwest
13-Aug-21
Way cool!

From: Slate
13-Aug-21
Very cool thanks for sharing

From: TJS
13-Aug-21
entertaining!

From: Papadeerhtr
18-Aug-21
Really cool video, no music made it so much better thanks for sharing!

From: 2Wild Bill
18-Aug-21
Enjoyed it, thank you. Made me thirsty, and I have watermelon in the frig.

From: Two Feathers
18-Aug-21
I liked it!

From: LBshooter
18-Aug-21
Very nice, so where is your stand in relations to the water hole? ??

From: LBshooter
18-Aug-21
Very nice, so where is your stand in relations to the water hole? ??

From: Rocky D
19-Aug-21
LB, not my video.

From: MOutside
29-Aug-21
Thanks for sharing and watching my video everyone. YouTube shows where your traffic is coming from, I had never visited these forums until I saw a lot of clicks coming from Bowsite. Enjoying some of the threads on here.

From: Zbone
30-Aug-21
Cool, thanks for sharing....

Yeah Medicineman, thought it looked like a Honey Badger too... I looked it up, I think it was a:

"The American hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus leuconotus) is a species of hog-nosed skunk from Central and North America, and is one of the largest skunks in the world, growing to lengths of up to 2.7 feet (82 cm).[2] Recent work has concluded the western hog-nosed skunk (formerly Conepatus mesoleucus) is the same species, and Conepatus leuconotus is the correct name of the merged populations.[3]

In Texas, it is commonly known as the rooter skunk for its habit of rooting and overturning rocks and debris in search of food."

From: wvfarrier
30-Aug-21
I had no idea that Arizona had bear that large

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