Mathews Inc.
New bow sight for aging eyes
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Old School 21-Aug-21
wyobullshooter 21-Aug-21
KSflatlander 21-Aug-21
ahunter76 21-Aug-21
wyobullshooter 21-Aug-21
Old School 21-Aug-21
tm 21-Aug-21
BRIBOWl 21-Aug-21
BRIBOWl 21-Aug-21
skull 21-Aug-21
Inshart 21-Aug-21
Old School 21-Aug-21
pav 22-Aug-21
txhunter58 22-Aug-21
WV Mountaineer 22-Aug-21
wyobullshooter 22-Aug-21
JL 22-Aug-21
wyobullshooter 22-Aug-21
cptbs 22-Aug-21
JL 22-Aug-21
Mike in CT 22-Aug-21
wyobullshooter 22-Aug-21
2Wild Bill 22-Aug-21
Stubbleduck 22-Aug-21
txhunter58 22-Aug-21
From: Old School
21-Aug-21
What do you fellow aging bow hunters recommend? I had cataract surgery a few years ago and my eyes aren’t what they used to be. Especially at the last 30 minutes of shooting light. I’m out shooting my bow today and I’ve got an older sight - probably 12 years old. Pins aren’t huge, but aren’t the new micro pins either. I’d like to switch to a newer sight with micro small pins but am wondering how my eyes will pick up the much smaller pin? I know the smaller pins will help by not covering up so much of the target but what about not seeing the pin as good?

Thanks

21-Aug-21
I love my Black Gold sights and prefer the .019 pins. They also offer .029 and .010 pins. If your eyes aren’t as good as they once were, I can’t imagine why you’d want to go with the .010’s. Also, make sure your peep is large enough to allow you to still see well in low-light conditions.’

From: KSflatlander
21-Aug-21
What about a peep clarifier?

From: ahunter76
21-Aug-21

ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
I shoot bowhunter class in tournaments & have .019 pins.. The "green" seem to be best for me no matter what target face..

21-Aug-21
Good point about pin color. Older eyes typically don’t see red as well as some other colors. I alternate my pins green, yellow (amber), green, yellow. Also as KS points out, if your pins are blurry, a verifier peep can certainly help once you determine the correct lens strength.

From: Old School
21-Aug-21
Thanks guys - I’m going to swing by a bow shop and see about a clarifier. Also see if I’m shooting .019 or .029 pins. My fist pin is green - could always see it best so I made it my 20 yard pin years ago.

From: tm
21-Aug-21
Most sights have a certain amount of extra fiber, I have used a little heat to make the end of the fiber a little bigger by melting it back. Be careful as it melts easily. That said a verifier may be the answer, just don't use one that hides the target more.

From: BRIBOWl
21-Aug-21
Any other sights not more than $150.00 that offers .29 thanks in advance.

From: BRIBOWl
21-Aug-21
Any other sights not more than $150.00 that offers .29 thanks in advance.

From: skull
21-Aug-21
I just purchased Black Good Verdict sight, plus I have a clarifier, best combination for me

From: Inshart
21-Aug-21
I've been using the verifier for several years now. My issue was either I could focus on the pins or the target - not both. The verifier cleared that up. If you go to a bow shop try out a few different magnifications to see what works best for you. Couple years ago I had to up it another strength.

From: Old School
21-Aug-21
That’s definitely part of my issue - either the pins or the target is in focus but not both. Tonight I’m dropping broadheads in the bullseye at 50 yards though. Has me rethinking changing anything. Would be nice to have perfect clarity of pins and target though.

Thanks for all the recommendations guys. I appreciate it.

From: pav
22-Aug-21
I'm curious about hunting with a verifier under adverse weather conditions. Will the lens fog up, draw moisture, etc...?

From: txhunter58
22-Aug-21
The most important thing to have clear is the sight pins. But keep in mind that technically using a clarifier or verifier is not legal in some states. For instance, Colorado considers it a “scope” because it has a lens.

22-Aug-21
All sights I’ve looked at recently had very bright optics. Meaning even the smaller ones get bright.

That’s something to consider too. I have a large scar on my cornea that is kind like a cataract. Except they can’t repair it line a cataract. It causes halo’s to appear around anything that’s bright. So, I taped over the optic lines until they darkened enough not to halo.

You can always darken them. But, can’t brighten them. But with confidence that which ever one you choose will be a serious upgrade to your current sight.

22-Aug-21
Paul, like most things, a verifier does have a couple cons. It can get moisture on it, but a quick swab with a Q-tip takes care of that issue. For me, the worst culprit was shooting into a rising or setting sun. It was like having a million candlepower spotlight shining in my eye. Luckily, the one time it happened was at a 3D shoot, not while hunting.

From: JL
22-Aug-21
Hmmm...I have the same low light problem too. With my readers on....I can see the peep/pins good but not the target so well. Without readers...good target, out of focus peep/pins. I've never played with one of these verifiers before. In good light....I don't have any focus issues.....just low light. Would a verifier cause problems or be noticable in good light?

Also....what's the difference between a clarifier and a verifier?

22-Aug-21
JL, I can’t think of any problems you’d run into in good light.

A verifier is more advantageous for hunting. It’s the lens in the peep that clears up your pins. If you’re lucky like I was, it also cleared up the target a bit, though to a much lesser degree.

A clarifier is more for targets. It has a lens in the peep, but is used in conjunction with a scope lens in your sight housing that clears up the target.

From: cptbs
22-Aug-21
I have a hard time seeing pins under certain conditions. Thinking about trying the ez v sight. Saw a guy using one at the archery range, he liked it for hunting, not so much for target archery.

From: JL
22-Aug-21
Wyo...thanks for the education. I seen them both mentioned above and was wondering if folks were just interchanging the words. Right now I use a 1/4" G5 peep. It's just the low light shooting that can be a small challenge for my eyes. Looks like a few folks have that problem.

From: Mike in CT
22-Aug-21
Focusing on the pins will allow the shooter to detect how much the pins are moving during the aiming process. At best this will lead the shooter to attempt to correct the pin floating around, at worst it can lead to target panic.

Focusing on the target presents no such problem as the target is a fixed object-it doesn't move. Whether you realize it or not as you are focused on the target your brain is making the necessary adjustments to center your pin on the target.

Do you "pick a spot" on the deer or do you focus on the pins and hope you hit the right spot on a blurry deer? The target is what you want to hit, not your pins.

22-Aug-21
Couldn’t agree with you more Mike. You definitely want to focus on the spot you want to hit rather than the pin as you start to execute the shot. However, it’s nice to see a crisp pin when you first come to full draw, then focus on your target. My problem was I would see three of each pin and they all looked like fuzzed out Q-tips. That was not fun.

From: 2Wild Bill
22-Aug-21
"Would be nice to have perfect clarity of pins and target though." - Absolutely, what ever that takes.

As the light diminishes, take only the closer/clearer shots. Being sure of your ability to make a clean kill is always the right thing to do.

From: Stubbleduck
22-Aug-21
The issue with a peep and pin system is mostly focusing on two different distances at the same time. I have been using a Zeiss Z Point red dot sight for ten plus years now as it neatly solves the focus issue as well as clarity of view. The Z point is no longer made but there are a number of other red dot sights that do the same thing. Red dot sights require a special sort of mount to allow for varying range. The older, sliding arc, HHA sights work OK but are hard to find now. A new mount, "Adjustable Red Dot" works well (Website adjustablereddot.com) with many if not most of the current red dot sights. Of course there is no peep sight needed for red dot sights as their optics will require the shooter to have the same eye position for every shot. Probably the major drawback to red dot sights, and associated mount if one wants variable range, is price. There are cheap red dots sights available however, as with most hunting related optics, you get what you pay for.

From: txhunter58
22-Aug-21
You always want to focus on the target when you shoot. But your pins need to be clear. That is true of any open sight apparatus.

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