HuntStand Hunting App
WY Desert Lope
Pronghorn
Contributors to this thread:
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
hdaman 24-Aug-21
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
Dale06 24-Aug-21
wytex 24-Aug-21
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
Bowboy 24-Aug-21
Treeline 24-Aug-21
smurph 24-Aug-21
Timbrhuntr 24-Aug-21
WYOelker 24-Aug-21
smarba 24-Aug-21
tm 24-Aug-21
Buffalo1 24-Aug-21
iceman 24-Aug-21
JohnMC 24-Aug-21
Buckeye 24-Aug-21
Buckeye 24-Aug-21
Quinn @work 24-Aug-21
goelk 24-Aug-21
SBH 24-Aug-21
JL 24-Aug-21
SDHNTR(home) 24-Aug-21
midwest 24-Aug-21
t-roy 24-Aug-21
Zackman 24-Aug-21
[email protected] 24-Aug-21
BowHiker 24-Aug-21
bowhunter24 25-Aug-21
BULELK1 25-Aug-21
wytex 25-Aug-21
WYOelker 25-Aug-21
Beav 25-Aug-21
From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21

WYOelker's embedded Photo
Sunrise in the rain and smoke...
WYOelker's embedded Photo
Sunrise in the rain and smoke...
WYOelker's embedded Photo
a place alone
WYOelker's embedded Photo
a place alone
WYOelker's embedded Photo
Always love hiking the rock and land. Never seeing a boot track and only occasionally crossing a can left by a sheep herder..
WYOelker's embedded Photo
Always love hiking the rock and land. Never seeing a boot track and only occasionally crossing a can left by a sheep herder..
Bare with me... Trying a new method to my hunt summary...

The Wyoming desert is an amazing remote, relentless, unforgiving and magical place. The stomping grounds of Butch Cassidy, cris crossed by the Overland trail, Oregon, Trail and the Cherokee Trail. the history is fun and exciting to learn. The desolate lands provide a person with the ability to completely escape. If you are brave (or dumb enough) you can venture hours into the country and find roads that disappear into washes, and places where a full day hike means you might see nothing indicating another human had ever been there. Fossils, horses, sage, snakes, lope, artifacts, mastodon bones and more.

From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21

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WYOelker's embedded Photo
WYOelker's embedded Photo
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The overland trail was an alternate route west to Oregon and California. It was used as early the 1820s. There are several locations in the Wyoming sage where a person can see the wagon ruts from back in the day. The overland trail was a stage trail and mail route that was busiest in the 1860s. The trail was all but abandoned in 1869 when the transcontinental railroad was completed.

Along the trail was Fort LaClede. This military fort supported 2 relatively large rock buildings that were built with sand stone from the surrounding area. Each building had small gun windows in every direction. The windows were designed to remain open and probably made the winter horrible. In addition to the rock fort there was also a gun tower and a stage stop.

The fort was occupied by the the B Company of the 11th Ohio Volunteer Calvary. They had several run ins with the natives and also issues with bandits robing stages etc.

From: hdaman
24-Aug-21
I like the educational aspect of this, thanks!

From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21

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WYOelker's embedded Photo
WYOelker's embedded Photo
wet rainy morning
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wet rainy morning
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Not much hope sitting on water...
WYOelker's embedded Photo
Not much hope sitting on water...
Almost everyone knows that the Pronghorn is the fastest land animals in North America. It is also the 2nd fastest in the world being just slightly slower than the cheetah.

Interestingly the pronghorn lack a clavicle(collar bone). This allows the pronghorn to have a significantly longer stride than other animals of similar size. In fact the stride length of a pronghorn at full speed is 29 feet. And at full speed a lope can cover the distance of a foot ball field in 11 strides and under 4 seconds...

The hunt was supposed to be from a box, but recent rains had left the ground soaked and the blind was a boring place to sit. Thus all our exploring... We resorted to spot and stalk...

We tried a couple stalks closing the distance to under 20 yards twice, only to have the lope blow up out of its bed. In our adventure we found several good bucks and named a few. Jesse, Chris, Vader, Buster, Wish, Hooker, etc.

On Sunday as we started heading back to camp we spotted a group of bucks in the sand dunes. I make a quick exit from the truck. and slip up. The largest buck was 40 yards away and behind a greasewood. I was able to come to full draw with my son. The buck stepped out and looked at me. The yellow pin instantly on the crease and arrow was gone in split second. The lope exploded into the distance and out of sight instantly. The arrow was lost in flight but the sound of the thwack was solid and reaction meant a hit. My son was not able to see the lope so we had no idea where the arrow hit.

From: Dale06
24-Aug-21
Great pics of some interesting historical artifacts. Good luck on the pronghorns.

From: wytex
24-Aug-21
How were those bentonite roads after the rain?

From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21

WYOelker's embedded Photo
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I can not figure out how to take a good lope shot... Or maybe I am just rushed to skin and cool the meat???
WYOelker's embedded Photo
I can not figure out how to take a good lope shot... Or maybe I am just rushed to skin and cool the meat???
We quickly ran to the rise in front of us to see what had happened. When we crested the hill there were 7 bucks leaving at full speed. All looked healthy and all looked similar...

We went back to shot location, retraced the shot the buck location etc. Found where the buck was standing at the shot. We had a good track in the damp firm sand. We looked for 20 minutes for the arrow with no luck before starting the track. The track bailed off and went 20 yards until it merged with all the other lope tracks. No hair, no blood nothing... We started looking at tracks after the merge spot (luckily all the bucks spread out in different directions as they left. The first track followed 50 yards no blood or sign. Back to the merge... Nest track 30 yards in and finally a little drop of blood, pin head sized. The a little bigger drop. The track was super easy to follow the blood was almost nonexistent and impossible to find every where except where the lope jump a chest high brush and rubbed off.

We were going really slow expecting the lope to be hurt but alive. easing along, 80 yards in, 100 yards in, still a solid track and almost no blood. 130 yards in and we spot shine in the brush. We approach slow and confirm the lope is down.

Shot was 3" above the heart, center punched both lungs, the lope ran full speed until it dropped. It was so fast there was barely any blood in mouth etc.

From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21

WYOelker's embedded Photo
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Meal times in the camper come with some competition...
WYOelker's embedded Photo
Meal times in the camper come with some competition...
We worked hard and had the lope on ice in the cooler in an hour.

We went back to find the arrow since it was a clean passthrough and not found. The lope was at 43 yards. The arrow actually went another 38 yard and stuck 4" in a wet sand bank. Love the energy of my set up.

My son was rewarded with some drive time back to camp. I love that soon I can have him pick me up on the other end, etc.

UNO was invented by a barber in 1971. He was having an argument about the Game Crazy Eights with his son. So in an attempt to solve the argument he made a new game. The traditional deck has 108 cards.

Kebabs originated in turke. Sish means skewer and kebab mean to roast meat. Skewered roasted meat. In many cultures today, it is a popular way to marinate and cook the less desirable and gamey meats.

From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21

WYOelker's embedded Photo
WYOelker's embedded Photo
As a young one, I remember watching Billy Crystal in City Slickers. A great scene in the show has one of his buddies doing paperwork in the bushes. He gets a prick on the but and looks to see a rattler. The scene while hilarious has always stuck with me. Every time I go to do my business in snake ground I must look like a yellow lab making cirlces checking all the surrounding bushes.

Well as a PSA, even that may not be enough. Saturday morning I am out doing my early morning business. As I finish I look over and see this dude about 3 feet away. He was cold and the sun had just came up. he was in no mood to fight. But it really brought back that scene.

FYI - I can't count on my son suck the poison from my rear... He was a hard NO!!!

From: Bowboy
24-Aug-21
Congrats on a great goat and thanks for the pictures and story.

From: Treeline
24-Aug-21
Congratulations! Great story and photos! Love seeing you out with the boy!

From: smurph
24-Aug-21
This is what makes me check bowsite daily. Thank you for sharing!

From: Timbrhuntr
24-Aug-21
Awesome hunt and story !!

From: WYOelker
24-Aug-21
WyTex, I always run an aggressive mud tire on my truck. I buy new ones almost every year. The roads were sloppy, wet and a mess. But having the right tire makes a ton of difference. It cost me extra but worth it when you are always out and about.

From: smarba
24-Aug-21
Congrats, thx for sharing! Loved all the pics and extra details!

From: tm
24-Aug-21
Great that you took the young'un too, nice story.

From: Buffalo1
24-Aug-21
Super story with a great ending. Congrats on a memorable hunt and trophy with your son.

From: iceman
24-Aug-21
Makin' memories with your son. Love it. Thanks for sharing.

From: JohnMC
24-Aug-21
It is like Rick from America Pickers when antelope with the story telling! Great hunt and even better having your son with you.

From: Buckeye
24-Aug-21
good for you Rob, spending time with your boy and putting tasty meat in the freezer.

From: Buckeye
24-Aug-21
good for you Rob, spending time with your boy and putting tasty meat in the freezer.

From: Quinn @work
24-Aug-21
Congrats! Nice lope. That's a lucky kid right there.

From: goelk
24-Aug-21
thanks for sharing, reminds me of my Dad when I was young

From: SBH
24-Aug-21
Love it. Well done spending time with your boy. Neither of you will forget that trip.....ever.

From: JL
24-Aug-21
Congrats and thanks for taking the time to post and picture up!

From: SDHNTR(home)
24-Aug-21
You sir, tell a fine story! I really appreciated the historical perspective and how you enjoyed it with your son. A Spot and Stalk pronghorn is no easy feat either. Congrats!

From: midwest
24-Aug-21
Great story and pics!

Remind me not to play Trivial Pursuit against you...

From: t-roy
24-Aug-21
Excellent story! Thoroughly enjoyed all of it, especially the father/son aspect of it.

I’m betting your son is looking even more forward to being able to drive and pick you up, than you are of him being able to do it!

From: Zackman
24-Aug-21
Very cool!

24-Aug-21
Thanks Robert, I enjoyed that. Paul

From: BowHiker
24-Aug-21
Thats what its all about. Bravo

From: bowhunter24
25-Aug-21
Well done sir, great write up and pics and what more dads should be doing! Thanks

From: BULELK1
25-Aug-21
Ya did just fine Rob--------->

Congrats Young fella for sure,

Robb

From: wytex
25-Aug-21
Do you run a mud terrain tire or an aggressive all terrain ? We run Duratracs on our truck for hunting. Great for snow, mud ok only.

Thanks for sharing, great story and enjoyable to read.

From: WYOelker
25-Aug-21
I have tried the Duratracs and they just are not enough for me. They are decent. I am currently running the STT Pro from Cooper. Love that tire. I will be getting the same again later this fall if needed. I usually buy truck tires every fall and sell my used ones on FB.

From: Beav
25-Aug-21
Enjoyed your recap! Thanks for sharing.

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