Sitka Gear
sleeping bag help
Moose
Contributors to this thread:
Powder 02-Sep-21
JohnMC 02-Sep-21
bentstick54 02-Sep-21
elkmtngear 02-Sep-21
Bowfinatic 02-Sep-21
Rickm 02-Sep-21
Predeter 02-Sep-21
Matt 03-Sep-21
wildwilderness 03-Sep-21
Kevin Dill 03-Sep-21
KSflatlander 03-Sep-21
peterk1234 03-Sep-21
Pop-r 03-Sep-21
JohnMC 03-Sep-21
Rickm 03-Sep-21
soccern23ny 03-Sep-21
Kevin Dill 04-Sep-21
hdaman 04-Sep-21
Tradmike 06-Sep-21
Powder 06-Sep-21
Powder 06-Sep-21
From: Powder
02-Sep-21
I've been considering getting a new sleeping bag for a while. How accurate do you think the temp ratings are? If my typical low temps are usually between 25 and 45 do I need to get a 0F bag or would that be overkill?

Any recommendations of bags?

From: JohnMC
02-Sep-21
I'd probably get a zero if I was going to be sleeping in 25 degree temps. Always better to have warmer than you need than the other way around. Also you never know when you might get hit with temps that are lower than you expected.

02-Sep-21
I agree. And you can always unzip if you get too warm.

From: elkmtngear
02-Sep-21
JohnMC x3. Bag ratings are "overrated", in general ;^)

02-Sep-21
I just used the kuiu 15 degree bag. 2 nights the Temps were below freezing. Bag kept me very warm just wore a shirt and hat those days. Otherwise Temps around 40 and bag was very comfortable

From: Rickm
02-Sep-21
It really depends on the manufacturer. I way prefer down. I have a 20 degree mountain hardware that is 15 plus years old and sleep comfortable down to 15-20 degrees. Base layers, liner and a good beanie go a long way. A good pad makes a big difference.

From: Predeter
02-Sep-21
Depends alot on the person, the quality of bag, and your sleeping pad (or lack thereof) but I think shooting for a temp rating 10 degrees lower than your lowest expected temp is a good rule of thumb for high quality bags. I also always bring a beanie hat to wear while sleeping too, makes a world of difference staying warm at night.

Low quality bags it's a crapshoot.

From: Matt
03-Sep-21
The higher quality the bag, the closer you will get to a comfort rating and not a survival rating. If I was buying a Slumberjack bag (or any other lower end bag), I would buy a 0 to deal with 20 degrees. If I was buying a Western Mountaineering bag (or any other high end bag), I would buy a 15 or 20 to deal with 20 degrees.

03-Sep-21
What Pad?

I would say a 15-20 bag would be good with a xterm . 0 F bag is just too much IMO unless you really are that cold

From: Kevin Dill
03-Sep-21
A thin base-layer of merino wool will add 5-10 degrees to any bag easily. A good warm beanie is mandatory for me. Loft is what traps air and trapped air is what keeps you warm. Many of the better bag companies can provide loft measurements (inches or cm) for comparison. Buy a bag which is definitely long enough to keep your feet from pushing against the bottom, unless you enjoy being awakened by cold feet.

Western Mountaineering bags are rated conservatively for comfort. A 15 degree bag will keep me warm and comfortable to at least 15 degrees. Add some merino and a beanie and I'll be fine. The coldest morning I've ever experienced on a moose hunt was 7 degrees. Everything in the tipi was covered in frosty crystals including my WM bag, but I was warm and dry. Serious investment, but I'm serious about sleeping well and comfortably.

From: KSflatlander
03-Sep-21
JohnMC X2…I can’t believe I said that

From: peterk1234
03-Sep-21
Predeter nailed it. All sound words.

I believe the bag ratings are based on a pad with at least a factor of R4, so consider that when looking at numbers. The bag ratings are certainly not standard across the industry neither. A silk liner can add 5 to degrees as well. Liners are nice because it keeps your bag clean longer too. I think a knitted hat adds 20 degrees. I am amazed at the heat loss through the noggin. I just ordered a Feathered Freinds Lark 10 degree. I expect it to keep me warm to 0. I have used a synthetic 35 degree bag for years, which has been used down to freezing temps with now issue. I have been using it with an uninsulated pad. I ordered an insulated pad as well. That came last week. Man, what a difference! A hat and a layer of clothes can also make a huge difference. It will be interesting though to experience how hot I will get above freezing temps.

From: Pop-r
03-Sep-21
Western mountaineering does not rate their bag temps with a pad with an R4. Furthermore I've never read where any quality bag company does. Maybe some do?

From: JohnMC
03-Sep-21
After KSflattbrimmer agreed with me I am changing my response to just take a light sheet.

From: Rickm
03-Sep-21
My Sea to Summit liner is a huge help. It is thin enough you can see through it but it ads a ton of comfort. Not sure if it wicking moisture away or adding heat but I won't sleep without it.

From: soccern23ny
03-Sep-21
https://www.rei.com/blog/camp/understanding-sleeping-bag-temperature-ratings

some good info here if you are looking at bags that have undergone standarized testing. If you normally sleep cold ignore the "lower limit" rating and stick to the comfort rating. I believe bags are also tested with a standardized sleeping pad, and not just on earth, but I could be wrong on this

Generally speaking an outer bivy can lower your bag's effective temp by 10deg F and is obviously windproof.

From: Kevin Dill
04-Sep-21
If you're really interested in staying warm: Buy a down-insulated pad like an Exped DownMat....incredible extra warmth and cushion.

From: hdaman
04-Sep-21
Black ovis has the big agnes lost dog synthetic 0 degree on sale. I have this and it's a decent bag for the price. I also have a liner. Good luck!

From: Tradmike
06-Sep-21
Just bought a zero degree bag on sale at Cabelas. 85.00. I wanted a retangle bag for more room to roll around.

From: Powder
06-Sep-21
How many of you put your pad inside the bag rather than underneath the sleeping bag?

From: Powder
06-Sep-21
How many of you put your pad inside the bag rather than underneath the sleeping bag?

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