Mathews Inc.
Montana Goat Hunt Crazy Mountains
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
SBH 22-Sep-21
Scoot 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
Scrappy 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
Treeline 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
JL 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
Treeline 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
JL 22-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 22-Sep-21
Hackbow 22-Sep-21
Treeline 22-Sep-21
Predeter 22-Sep-21
Aubs8 23-Sep-21
iceman 23-Sep-21
Old Reb 23-Sep-21
deerhunter72 23-Sep-21
Scoot 23-Sep-21
Big Fin 23-Sep-21
butcherboy 23-Sep-21
BULELK1 24-Sep-21
SBH 24-Sep-21
JL 24-Sep-21
Oryx35 24-Sep-21
t-roy 25-Sep-21
Barry Wensel 26-Sep-21
hdaman 26-Sep-21
Treeline 26-Sep-21
SmokedTrout 26-Sep-21
Brotsky 27-Sep-21
ROUGHCOUNTRY 27-Sep-21
SmokedTrout 29-Sep-21
TGbow 29-Sep-21
SBH 29-Sep-21
Southern draw 29-Sep-21
darktimber 29-Sep-21
bowbender77 30-Sep-21
BigSkyHntr 30-Sep-21
Inshart 30-Sep-21
txhunter58 10-Oct-21
From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
I debated about posting my "rifle" kill but I decided to give other folks a searchable reference about this hunt for a future tag holder. It may spark some good questions as well about goat hunting and put some common anxieties into focus with regards to Mountain Goat hunting.....the ultimate physical hunt!

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
First off, I think I had 15 bonus/preference points to draw this tag and I had flip-flopped different districts, sometimes applying for a unit closer to my home in Montana. This summer had been unprecedented with wildfires and drought which brought about forest closures as well. I was not able to step foot into the Crazy Mountains because of a fire on the north end of the isolated mountain range. My cousin and one client had drawn the tag previously and were my main source of intel about the area and number of goats etc.... I fully expected to have to hunt later in the season due to the closure but ONE week before the opener (September 1st) the trailhead and campground for my access re-opened. I wanted to hunt earlier for a couple reasons: First, I could bring my middle son Jacob along for a companion and pack mule since he wouldn't be starting school until September 14th. Secondly, even though I had been warned about shorter hair on the goat hides, I wanted to avoid snow/ice on the dangerous peaks. As we approached the trail head, Jacob could finally make out the previously unseen mountain peaks through the smoke.

From: SBH
22-Sep-21
Heck ya! This should be good. Looking forward to it Mike.

From: Scoot
22-Sep-21
This one's gonna be good!

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
This mountain range was unusual to me as there were private sections checkerboarded throughout the mountain range. I finally reached the main ranch headquarters a woman representing the multi-state land owners said they allowed access through but said no hunting. My client had suggested I stop anyway at the ranch outpost near the trailhead and ask the foreman anyway since they'd given him permission two years earlier. A new younger couple had been hired over the summer and they granted me permission to hunt!

As we were loading our gear we actually spotted a goat way above the campground in the nose bleed section. The season wouldn't start until tomorrow so we loaded our gear and started the slow ascent up the trail head deeper into the mountain range.

I would pack my bow and Jacob would pack my rifle. I normally hunt with a badlands pack but for maximum load, we both wore heavier MOLLE II marine packs I'd purchased from ebay years earlier that we normally used to haul meat. They were heavier weight but tough. I brought some climbing rope and felt like I could even tie on to Jacob and his pack and lower him down to my goat if I had to:)

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
My other two boys wear glasses but Jacob vision is pretty good. He's still learning about the art of glassing as he wants to spot everything with the naked eye and then verify with binoculars. Anyhow, I was amazed as he was spotting goats that I could see with my binos and we ended up seeing six total that first 2.5 miles in.

From: Scrappy
22-Sep-21
This sounds like the making of a great hunting story.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21
I was researching ultra light tents over the summer and was amazed at the breaking point in price once you went under about 3 pounds. I ended up buying a Eureka that I believe was 3.5 pounds with a good vestibule for 100.00 used on Craigslist. It looked like the main difference was the aluminum poles and aluminum stakes.

I could see right away that finding a piece of level dirt could be a problem for pitching a tent. Additionally, I had pictured us wearing our camp on our backs and camping each night wherever we ended up. With the warm temperatures and the physical weight I was starting to think we should set up a permanent camp that was central and we could reach each night without having to hike out.

We were also relying on our catadyne water filter and I needed our camp to be close to a creek or spring for convenience. As darkness was approaching that first night we found a small fairly level spot just large enough for our tent next to a foot bridge.

I had also purchased a couple of the new "ultralight" inflatable air mattresses that are selling all over facebook. I tested them at home and they seemed amazing but I have to be honest and tell you that at 49 years of age, they were no match for the packed granite soil.

From: Treeline
22-Sep-21
Great story going for sure! Keep it rolling!

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
We set up our camp right next to the creek but we were also in the trees and couldn't see the canyon sides where the goats would be from that spot. I had ideally wished that we could be in a spot where we could unzip the tent door and glass for goats.

We finished dinner and decided to look around for a few minutes of last light to hopefully spot some animals. We walked out on the foot bridge and could see some openings and avalanche chutes directly above our camp. Low and behold, we spotted a large, lone mountain goat feeding about 1500 yards above camp. We watched as he bedded down with darkness finally making him invisible.

We had a plan for the morning now! Could it be this easy as we were only 2.5 miles in on the first day? I knew we could get to the tree line but it looked pretty dang steep in the chutes. I was starting to get some anxiety as nearly all the goats we spotted walking in were in definite "no go zones" for me and it was unnerving even imagining trying to climb up to them. I was encouraged as we went further into the mountains, they were getting closer to us as the trail was gaining elevation.

From: JL
22-Sep-21
IMO....ain't no problem posting rifle hunts. I know lots of folks like to read about the hunts and see the pics and vids. Thank you ahead of time for taking the time to post up your hunt and pics!!

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
Neither of us slept very well that night, tossing and turning. It was pitch black with the sounds of the stream and a few strange noises here and there. With the drought, the black bears were leaving a lot of scat and sign along the creeks as well. There was even scat on the main road driving in and the ranch foreman claimed they had 3 different bears visiting their lodge and cabins for chokecherries.

I kept thinking that a bedded mountain goat should stay put especially on a dark night without the moon. As warm as it was during the day (80 degrees), we were a little chilly in the pre-dawn hours without heavy clothing. Additionally, the vestibule was nice as morning dew had everything out in the open wetted down.

To my surprise, the lone goat was completely gone as I hustled to the foot bridge to glass in the morning. I climbed up further on the opposite side of the creek into a meadow to see better and still no sighting. He'd either come down to the tree line, went completely over the top or rounded the corners of the chutes. Both Jacob and I would have never guessed that but it was our first day and we hadn't really explored our area.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
Although the trail zig-zagged for 15 miles and we could walk clear through the crazy mountains to the other side, I felt like there were enough goats around that we could probably hunt in a 5-6 mile radius and be successful.

Both my client and the ranch foreman had mentioned a chain of lakes about 5.5-6 miles in where goats had been spotted over the summer. My client had waited too long the year he hunted and couldn't make it all the way to the lakes with deep snow stopping them.

I talked it over with my son and we decided to make the hike to the lakes, hopefully glassing as we hiked and if nothing turned up, we could double time it back to camp and look for the goat above our camp in the afternoon.

( Jacob enjoys hunting but has never shown interest in archery. He's also a pretty quiet kid but he said to me while hiking that he was fascinated with mountain goats and it was his dream hunt someday and he was glad I was sharing the hunt with him) choke-up moment:)

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
I'm glad I wasn't any older drawing this tag as I was admittedly a little stiff and sore that next morning. We were still climbing and looking over some great country but we hadn't spotted a single animal all the way up the trail. With no cell signal, I had saved an off-line map of the area using OnX mapping app. It was invaluable with elevations and I could tell exactly where we were at all times and knew when the trail meandered next to or away from the creek.

Also, the secondary trail climbing up to the lakes could have been missed if you weren't paying attention but I knew we were getting close with the map and zoned in when it was time.

I was surprised how long my cell phone battery was holding up with it turned to airplane mode and using the off-line map. I also had picked up a charging battery from Wal Mart for like 12.00 that carried 3 charges and was small and both Jacob and I charged our phones off it at night with two ports.

The climb was getting pretty steep going up the secondary trail and we would stop and glass back across the main drainage to the opposite side with still no goats spotted...…..I'm getting a little nervous now both with elevation and lack of game.

One sweet surprise was at a certain altitude, we found a cluster of wild raspberry plants. We took a break and grazed on the fresh fruit which was a nice supplement to our mountain house meals.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
The lakes were actually up and over the canyon sides and I was really impressed with the beauty of the area. It was wild and scenic like a high alpine basin but I also kind of chuckled as no deer or elk or any sign. This was pretty much goat and bear country. Apparently, these goats are not native to these mountains but were transplanted at some point and have done phenomenally well. I think they have the highest goat population in the state.

According to the map, the trail dead ended at the lakes and I was noticing now our steep descent down to the lakes the last 4-500 yards. Anything shot would have to be packed up and over now.

We finally made it and we're 5-6 miles in at this point and worked up a pretty good sweat. I suggested we sit down and glass and rest for awhile. My initial scanning isn't showing any goats but this place is a postcard. It's around 11:00 a.m. and I'm in no hurry to leave and know we have plenty of time to make it back to hunt for the goat above camp if necessary. So we take off our packs and hydrate and eat some snacks and I'm considering taking a little siesta:)

Jacob is restless and decides to walk around in the immediate trees to glass and look around. Since were in the timber we have openings and blocked areas where we can't see as we look across the lakes and up the canyons and cliffs across.

As you can see from the map, the Crazy Mountains are isolated from other mountain ranges and OnX showed the fire activity. Amazingly, as smoky as it was coming in, this day was clear and beautiful.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
Jacob excitedly runs back toward me and says "Dad, I think I just spotted a couple goats." I walk to the opening he's glassing from and can see why I missed these guys. The entire face is in the shade which makes it a logical bedding area for the goats on a warm day. One is larger than the other but they're a long way off and at the very top of sharp knife ridge that I wouldn't climb for anyone. I'm guessing a nanny and kid but continue to glass below them in the shade.

Suddenly, I see another larger goat below them 300-400 yards and he looks to be a Billy. I'm not sure if it's possible but we have to cross the lakes below us and climb an steep face and we'll have to approach them in sight the last stretch. I lay out the possibilities to Jacob and tell him we have time but it's even farther to pack one out.

He's game and we take off down the hill and hope to cross between Blue Lake and Granite Lake. When we approach the bottom, I can see it's basically a dried up creek bed with water and boulders scattered in the bottom. We were able to keep our feet dry and jump from stone to stone and begin making our way up the opposite side. We'll have to top the first ridge to be in sight of the goats again. The wind is in our favor but the shade is moving and I'm worried if we don't hustle, they may reposition.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
I was amazed as we topped the ridge and the goat is 1000 yards out, he looks to have spotted us in the sunshine. I can't be sure, but he looks like he's staring at us already. The two above him are gone and we have to move slow for a couple hundred yards in the open to hit some scattered trees for cover. The good news is he's definitely a Billy and we haven't blown him out yet. As we move in the open slowly, he gets up and he definitely sees us. Jacob is starting to fever up:) and telling me to shoot. I remind him he's probably 800 yards away.

I don't rifle hunt much anymore and I don't even have a gun for long range shooting. It's a Remington model 7600 pump chambered in 30-06. I did replace the scope with the 3 reticle version and sighted it in and taped the trajectory table to the stock. However, my cheap range finders that work well for bow hunting don't seem to register hardly anything past 250-300 yards.

We make it to the trees and we're out of sight for the moment but I don't know if he's going to blow out or simply exit up and over the top like I suspect the two above him have already done. We are probably at 5-600 yards and Jacob and drop our packs since we're running out of trees to hide in. I can see the goat looking down for us but remarkably he moved a few yards and re-bedded. Once again Jacob is asking me to shoot. It's starting to sink in that this particular goat is not going to be within archery range and he's seen us. I am fighting the range finder and finally get a reading off a large slab below him at 320 yards. I'm estimating the goat which is above and behind the slab to be around 380 yards now. He looks huge and I decide I will try with my rifle so Jacob takes off his coat and rolls it up and I try and look at him but the distance is between reticles and he's so far above us that I can't get the gun stock square on my shoulder. I tell him I'm not comfortable and we should try to get closer.

I can see a mound up ahead of us that I could set up on but the goat is laying down broadside and looks nervous. I can see a diagonal trail through the rubble just above him that he could escape on. We make it safely to the mound and I set up again and I get a range of 309 yards just in front of him. I estimate he's about 312 yards which is exactly the first reticle on my scope below the cross hairs.

I squeeze and shoot and apparently hit just above him and he stands. I shoot again I hear the familiar pop and he jumps. He's still broadside and I shoot a third time and hear it pop and he jumps about 5 feet in the air and commandos off the cliff and starts somersaulting back down right at us. I'm guessing he rolled close to 100 yards and finally stops wedged in boulders on his back with his chin pointed up.

I send Jacob back for our packs and just lay there and take it all in. I can't see his horns but I'm worried he's probably broke his horns off and I'm picturing myself digging through rubble looking for pieces of broken goat horn:)

Even though he's not far above us now, it took forever to climb the rubble and I keep looking at him in my binos. I'm second guessing myself and wondering if I shot a nanny and if it's smaller bodied than I suspected. When we finally reach him I'm blown away. He's huge! The body is larger than I suspected and his horns are intact with some fresh chipping at the tips from the fall. I suspected he'd have bare patches of hide from falling but that's all in place too although I can see a trail of white hair on the rocks. It's a beautiful moment and I want the lakes in the background for photos but we're afraid of moving him and sending him rolling again. We finally get him tagged and positioned for photos and then I decide to skin him life-size.

What a chore! I think from adrenaline and the altitude and exhaustion I'm starting to get sick. It probably took two hours to skin him out and debone the meat in that awkward position.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
In my mind I thought goats would have tiny pointed hooves but it's just the opposite as they have broad soft hooves with big ankles and feet. I cut the leg bones off at the knee and cut the head off behind the skull and sent Jacob with it down to the closest flat spot and prayed he wouldn't kill himself. We then loaded the meat and our gear and lowered ourselves to the flatter spot. I could tell we couldn't make it as presently constituted. I sat there and removed the leg bones to save weight on the hide while getting sicker and sicker. I felt too weak and a little guilty as I loaded Jacob with the entire head and hide and half the meat but I didn't feel like I could do it. We then started our descent only falling a couple times:)

We faced another decision as we had crossed between the first two lakes coming in but I did not want to climb the steep grade we'd come down to the lakes. I look at my map and study the contour lines and asked Jacob if we should cross between the 2nd and 3rd lakes and bush whack around back to the main trail without having to climb. I said it was possibly risky but he agreed and we had a rough go side hilling and cliffing out with no trail. He couldn't stand up by himself so I'd stand on his feet and pull him up. He was top heavy enough that he nearly fell backwards down the cliffs while we were bush whacking back to the main trail. My fear was running out of daylight and having to spend the night on that steep face I couldn't see around.

Finally we reunited with the lake trail and my anxiety was finally starting to subside. Additionally, I was getting stronger as we were getting lower and I took the additional meat from Jacob's pack.

We made it back to our tent just before dark and I was dumbfounded as the large goat was in the exact same spot from the evening before . I could see a water coming out of the rocks in that spot and now suspected it was his watering spot in the afternoons. It's a really tough archery area in my estimation but I would have liked to have tried to set up for that goat with my bow. Unfortunately, the lack of boots on the ground scouting hurt us in that department.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
We still tossed and turned and kept sliding down to the bottom of the tent with the grade. However, I did give Jacob one last obstacle and that was how he'd handle M.H. Chili Mac:) It didn't rip his guts out like it does mine......And the goat was gone again above camp the next morning.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
To say I was saddle sore the next morning would be an understatement. However, it was all downhill but I notice as I get older, my feet get really sore from hard hiking. Jacob wasn't quite the happy camper he was the previous day. He'd gotten his boots wet crossing the 2nd and 3rd lakes and had brought his tennis shoes and decided to hike out in those.....I told him he was probably the only kid in the world that had packed a mountain goat with Shaq Attack shoes, ha.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
With the warm temps and my previous taxidermy experience I decided to bring my fleshing beam and tools and salt to prep the hide. The park ranger may have frowned but I clamped the fleshing beam to our campground picnic table and went to work!

I found some hair slippage but I think most of it was arrested with the timely care of the hide. I turned the lips, nose, ears etc....and applied the salt.

From: Treeline
22-Sep-21
Awesome recap! Love that you had your son with you on this one! Beautiful place for sure! Congratulations!

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
fleshing and salting

From: JL
22-Sep-21
Pretty cool ya got it with a Rem 7600 semi. I have that in a .270.

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
22-Sep-21

ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
ROUGHCOUNTRY's embedded Photo
In Montana, it's mandatory to check in your M.G. so we stopped in Bozeman on the way home and they pulled a tooth and estimated with growth rings to be a 6.5 year old Billy. Interestingly, they said I was the 2nd goat checked in and the first was a 1.5 year old kid. Dang, for essentially a lifetime license that would be hard for me.

Also, my youngest is a Randy Newberg fan and said he also has a M.G. tag this year so hopefully we hear from him at some point and hopefully he wasn't the guy that shot the kid:)

I boiled the entire skull for now and fixed the chipped tips...…..he's now flawless, ha.

From: Hackbow
22-Sep-21
Congratulations on a great hunt! Thanks for the recap.

From: Treeline
22-Sep-21
Looks great! Can’t wait to see the finished mount!

One thing to consider is getting a reproduction made for mounting and keep the skull. Kind of a two for one on the trophy….

I’m doing that for my black tail from last year and will do it for any sheep in the future!

From: Predeter
22-Sep-21
Congrats! Awesome hunt, especially with your son!

Crazy Mountains mtn. goat is my dream hunt but I'm a few years behind you in points.

From: Aubs8
23-Sep-21
Great job! A very tough hunt! Congratulations!

From: iceman
23-Sep-21
Congratulations! Thanks for sharing with us

From: Old Reb
23-Sep-21
Congratulatons and thanks for sharing your adventures with us. These hunting stories are a refreshing break from all the COVID threads that have been posted.

From: deerhunter72
23-Sep-21
Great hunt and story! Extra special to have done it with you son. Congratulations to you both!

From: Scoot
23-Sep-21
Pretty dang awesome! Totally agree regarding having your son along- memories to last his life. Many congrats!

From: Big Fin
23-Sep-21
Great write up. Congratulations on a great goat. And sharing it with your son will be the more memorable part.

Next time you're in Bozeman, I hope I am around. I'd love to catch up with you and your son. I do have a goat tag, but in a different unit. I saw a shooter on Monday, but I am waiting for November fur. Hope I don't regret that decision to pass.

From: butcherboy
23-Sep-21
Great hunt! One question though. Does your son ever smile? LOL

From: BULELK1
24-Sep-21
Heck Yeah!

Memories for you and your Son for life.

Good luck, Robb

From: SBH
24-Sep-21
Super cool man!

From: JL
24-Sep-21
I hope RC comes back to finish up this story.....I'm looking forward to it.

From: Oryx35
24-Sep-21
Awesome! Thanks for sharing. I look forward to seeing how Randy's hunt turns out too.

From: t-roy
25-Sep-21
Great write up, Mike! Congrats on a terrific adventure, made even more special by getting to share it with your son! Beautiful goat as well.

From: Barry Wensel
26-Sep-21
I've known Mike Prescott since he was in grade school. He was the kid you saw peddling his bike with a bow/arrows, a .22 and fishing rod all tied to the handlebars or slung across his shoulders. Gene and I have always told colorful stories of Mike's adolescent years and his robust enthusiasm. Yes, this was a rifle mountain goat hunt in Montana. But Mike explained his reasoning for posting this thread in his very first post. And I'm glad he did. Bowsiters can read between the lines and learn from this thread, be it bow or gun hunting. He portrayed a lot that goes into a hunt like this so folks might not bite off more than they can chew. Good job Mike! And for those of you who aren't familiar with Mike just hit on his "ROUGHCOUNTRY" Bowsiter name to see 68 more pictures of hunting memories from a guy few people have heard of. In fact, goat gun-kill or not, someone should nominate him for Montana Bowhunter of the Year for the sum total of what he's bowkilled over the last couple decades. He's come a long way since we saw him peddling his bike down the "ROUGHCOUNTRY" roads of rural Montana. Good job Mike. Congratulations. BW

From: hdaman
26-Sep-21
Great hunt and write up! Thanks for sharing!

From: Treeline
26-Sep-21
Hell of an endorsement right there from Barry!

From: SmokedTrout
26-Sep-21
Congrats on the memorable hunt and thanks for the write up and pics! Awesome that Jacob got to help and share the adventure. How does he eat?

From: Brotsky
27-Sep-21
Awesome hunt and story Mike! Loved every moment of it! Congrats on a beautiful goat!

From: ROUGHCOUNTRY
27-Sep-21
I heard horror stories about how bad MG tasted and it’s toughness.

We ground the burger with some beef tallow.

The back straps were a little chewy but tolerable. However, the sirloin were chewier and the round steaks were so chewy I spit out a sample. For the latter two steaks, we ran them 4 directions through a cuber.

The meat had no wild taste at all with great flavor and color. The chewy reputation was correct but there are fixes for that like grounding and cubing.

From: SmokedTrout
29-Sep-21
Ha. I am glad he tastes good! I shot a goat in 2009, estimated 9 years old, and had a similar experience with eating it. I thought the flavor was excellent, but only the back straps where chewable. So I either ground the rest, made a few cube steaks like you, and also a couple of small roasts that I corned. Mountain goat burgers where very enjoyable, I miss them and would love to get another chance at a goat.

I do remember when field dressing the goat that I thought the meat smelled very good, and I wasn't disappointed in the flavor. But man was it tough.

Thanks again for your write up, and good luck with the rest of the season.

From: TGbow
29-Sep-21
Awsome! Congratulations

From: SBH
29-Sep-21
Mike is a killer. There is no doubt about that.

29-Sep-21
Congrats enjoyed the story!

From: darktimber
29-Sep-21
Congratulations Mike! Awesome Billy and story! Thanks for taking us along.

From: bowbender77
30-Sep-21
Well done, congrats.

From: BigSkyHntr
30-Sep-21
Congrats Mike, great goat, great story!! Mountain goat is one of my dream hunts. Thanks for sharing!

From: Inshart
30-Sep-21
As others have said, just plain outstanding.

From: txhunter58
10-Oct-21
Good thread

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