Sitka Gear
Snowshoes
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
bghunter 26-Nov-21
jmiller 26-Nov-21
Overland 26-Nov-21
ben h 26-Nov-21
Bow Bullet 26-Nov-21
bghunter 27-Nov-21
APauls 27-Nov-21
thedude 27-Nov-21
White Falcon 27-Nov-21
Rocky D 27-Nov-21
2Wild Bill 27-Nov-21
skookumjt 27-Nov-21
Katahdin 28-Nov-21
Lawdy 29-Nov-21
bghunter 29-Nov-21
BULELK1 01-Dec-21
BULELK1 01-Dec-21
skookumjt 01-Dec-21
Rocky D 01-Dec-21
Rocky D 01-Dec-21
Lawdy 02-Dec-21
Lawdy 02-Dec-21
skookumjt 02-Dec-21
Rocky D 02-Dec-21
From: bghunter
26-Nov-21
So I should draw my WI bobact tag next year. Guide I plan on going with suggested snowshoes. Never used them so looking for some suggestions. I don't want to spend a fortune as never plan on using them other then for this hunt. As I hope to move to FL and never see snow again lol

From: jmiller
26-Nov-21
I have a pair of Crescent Moon. They arent super expensive and they work great.

From: Overland
26-Nov-21
MSR Evo Ascent snowshoes are the gold standard. Somehow MSR just got them right and every other manufacturer has fallen short trying to play catch-up. Due to them widely being regarded as the best the resale is also very strong.

From: ben h
26-Nov-21

ben h's Link
I have Redfeather snowshoes and have been happy with them. They're not terribly expensive and made in LaCrosse WI. Check them out.

From: Bow Bullet
26-Nov-21
How long is your hunt? Depending on how long you'll need them you might be able to rent them cheaper than buying them. Otherwise look for used ones. I also have the Evo Ascents. Very durable in rugged terrain, plastic platforms with metal cleats. The cleats are real beneficial on side hills. "Ascent" in the MSR names mean they have the heel lifts for climbing steeper hills. The lifts aren't a necessity for hills but can make it easier on your calf muscles. And be sure to get a set of poles with snow baskets too.

From: bghunter
27-Nov-21
Hunt is as long as it takes to kill. So if i get lucky like my MT Lion two days lol.

Never thought about renting them. I may look into that.

I will check ebay etc for some used ones too.

From: APauls
27-Nov-21

APauls's Link
Check your local kijiji or Craig's list. Also, most "modern" snowshoes SUCK in any kind of snow. If you have to walk through any kind of brush, Ojibwa style shoes are where it's at. Anything rounded on the front sucks brutally. If you're walking on a trail or across a farmers field they are fine. Get into the bush and get you some Ojibwa's.

There are also companies where you can buy kits to make them yourself. Fun project. Link to one attached. They are generally well reviewed I haven't checked this site.

From: thedude
27-Nov-21
The msr as mentioned above or look for a deal on the army surplus “Denali”. Make sure you get the extensions. I have used those things to hike bear baits up a mountain through alders and across ridges for winter bird hunts. Take paracord in case you break a rubber strap. Try them on with your boots to get the hang of strapping them on

From: White Falcon
27-Nov-21

White Falcon's embedded Photo
White Falcon's embedded Photo
Don't need these at my house.

From: Rocky D
27-Nov-21
Buy cheap on eBay and then sale them cheap on eBay!

From: 2Wild Bill
27-Nov-21
Modern metal frame snowshoes tend to be noisy.

From: skookumjt
27-Nov-21
I can't imagine trying to wear snowshoes anywhere that you'll find bobcats. I have logged hundreds of miles on snowshoes working as a forester and for personal use but have never even considered bringing my snowshoes when running cats. They are not conducive to getting through the brush nor moving quickly. I don't care how deep the snow is, I would rather plow through whatever deep snow I might find and be able to bust through the brush that you are guaranteed to be in.

I've never even seen a pair in the back of a truck with any of the cat guys I know.

From: Katahdin
28-Nov-21
I too have been on snowshoes half of my life. I agree with skook and if the dogs can make it to the tree you should be able to also.

From: Lawdy
29-Nov-21
I live on snowshoes all winter running hounds, trapping, and surveying deer yards. I couldn’t imagine trying to plow through 3 to 5 feet of snow in our woods up here without show shoes. I wear traditional bear paws made near here, with bindings made by a fellow trapper in Fort Kent, Maine.

29-Nov-21

Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Altitude Sickness 's embedded Photo
Check these out on the auction site.

From: bghunter
29-Nov-21
Thank you for the information. I never been on snowshoes in my life so trust the experience here.

I will say I couldn't imagine when I went on my MT Lion hunt wearing snowshoes chasing those cats thats for sure. It was what the outfitter suggested so I figured ask around here. Funny part is I never asked him what kind of snowshoes lmao.

From: BULELK1
01-Dec-21

BULELK1's embedded Photo
BULELK1's embedded Photo
This will be my 3rd year with these....

I'm content,

Robb

From: BULELK1
01-Dec-21

BULELK1's embedded Photo
BULELK1's embedded Photo
Pretty Stable-------->

01-Dec-21
I agree with the others. I would rather fight the snow than the brush and the snow with shoes on. If you haven’t paid him yet. I would ask other guides and would think for the few times you need them they would have a pair for you to borrow. If the money is no issue those used ojibwas are a good deal and they look good when not in use.

From: skookumjt
01-Dec-21
3-5' of snow in Maine, hunting out west, etc. are completely different than bobcat hunting in WI. You are unlikey to have more then a foot of snow and you will definitely be going through brush so thick you will have to close your eyes, grab your hat, and just bull through it, dragging your gun behind. And be in a hurry. If you've never worn snowshoes you'll end up face down in the snow looking like an upside down turtle.

Carharrts or wool pants, good boots, gaiters and will power are what you want.

From: Rocky D
01-Dec-21
If my guide recommended snowshoes then I would damn sure show up with snowshoes!

I was in the Army in Alaska and a Battalion Commander made a decision not to take snowshoes based on weather intelligence and ended up missing their hit time because the unit was post holing it in three foot drifts.

It’s one thing to have them and not need them but to need them and not have them is unacceptable from my perspective.

01-Dec-21
I know in the U.P. Of Michigan bobcats will be where their food is. And that’s deep dark thick cedar swamps and alder swamps. I would pay to watch someone in an alder swamp in snow shoes.

From: Rocky D
01-Dec-21
Alt, gotcha but I think that the guide’s recommendation should bare some valued weight in the decision process. Eighty bucks bought and eighty bucks sold. Actually, you would be just renting them.

I have tramped many miles on snowshoes in Alaska and through some pretty dense alder thickets and I know what it’s like to need them and not have them!

From: Lawdy
02-Dec-21
I hunt hare in cedar and alder swamps. The bear paws I use are very maneuverable. Two years ago, we had very early deep snow up here. Guys with hunting camps could not get to them. I hunted on snowshoes and shot a buck I tracked all day. Saw him 5 times in waist deep snow before I shot him. He was exhausted and so was I. In really deep snow, you can literally run a deer down on snowshoes. My brother ran his buck down on shoes, and shot it in its bed with a rifle. The biggest thing is to use shoes that will carry your weight. Modern shoes are noisy, and when it gets really cold, the plastic bindings break. As far as bobcats treeing close, that depends on the cat. I hounded one that treed within a half mile, while another took my hounds right to the top of a mountain. That was before our fish and game declared them endangered, caving to the antis. Now I release several every year while canine trapping, and they raid chicken houses here.

From: Lawdy
02-Dec-21
I hunt hare in cedar and alder swamps. The bear paws I use are very maneuverable. Two years ago, we had very early deep snow up here. Guys with hunting camps could not get to them. I hunted on snowshoes and shot a buck I tracked all day. Saw him 5 times in waist deep snow before I shot him. He was exhausted and so was I. In really deep snow, you can literally run a deer down on snowshoes. My brother ran his buck down on shoes, and shot it in its bed with a rifle. The biggest thing is to use shoes that will carry your weight. Modern shoes are noisy, and when it gets really cold, the plastic bindings break. As far as bobcats treeing close, that depends on the cat. I hounded one that treed within a half mile, while another took my hounds right to the top of a mountain. That was before our fish and game declared them endangered, caving to the antis. Now I release several every year while canine trapping, and they raid chicken houses here.

From: skookumjt
02-Dec-21
He's not talking about hunting in Maine in March. He's talking about hunting northern WI in December and January. It's exceptionally rare to have more than a foot of snow except in a couple of spots that are in the Lake Superior snow belt. Even then I would rather trudge through the snow a than fight snowshoes. And I own several pair of all different sizes, designs, etc. that I use frequently. Just not for bushwhacking through rough country.

From: Rocky D
02-Dec-21
I wonder why the guide ever recommended snowshoes?

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