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Osso Buco help.....
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Medicinemann 05-Dec-21
hunter12345 05-Dec-21
Dikndirt 05-Dec-21
Medicinemann 05-Dec-21
Ambush 05-Dec-21
bigeasygator 05-Dec-21
DanaC 06-Dec-21
timex 06-Dec-21
BIGRICH 06-Dec-21
Ucsdryder 06-Dec-21
Ambush 06-Dec-21
tobywon 06-Dec-21
loprofile 06-Dec-21
Medicinemann 06-Dec-21
Cornpone 06-Dec-21
Ambush 06-Dec-21
Medicinemann 06-Dec-21
Ambush 06-Dec-21
Medicinemann 07-Dec-21
SIP 07-Dec-21
Stekewood 07-Dec-21
Medicinemann 07-Dec-21
APauls 07-Dec-21
Shug 07-Dec-21
Shug 07-Dec-21
Shug 07-Dec-21
ki-ke 07-Dec-21
Shug 07-Dec-21
SIP 07-Dec-21
Yellowjacket 07-Dec-21
SIP 07-Dec-21
ki-ke 08-Dec-21
midwest 08-Dec-21
timex 08-Dec-21
ki-ke 08-Dec-21
MarkU 08-Dec-21
RT 08-Dec-21
Stekewood 08-Dec-21
Stekewood 08-Dec-21
Ambush 08-Dec-21
tobywon 08-Dec-21
ki-ke 08-Dec-21
Stekewood 08-Dec-21
timex 08-Dec-21
ki-ke 08-Dec-21
Shug 08-Dec-21
Medicinemann 08-Dec-21
walleyes 08-Dec-21
walleyes 08-Dec-21
walleyes 08-Dec-21
ki-ke 09-Dec-21
Stekewood 12-Dec-21
M.Pauls 13-Dec-21
Grey Ghost 13-Dec-21
Medicinemann 13-Dec-21
Ambush 13-Dec-21
Grey Ghost 13-Dec-21
From: Medicinemann
05-Dec-21
I have never tried to prepare wild game shanks in an osso buco recipe. Decided to give it a try for tomorrow. Most recipes are calling for a Dutch oven, and I can't find mine right now. Therefore, I am going to try to use a crock pot instead. The low temperature setting on my crock pot is 200 degrees. For those that have prepared osso buco shanks before, is 200 degrees still too high of a temperature? Should I dig out my dutch oven (wherever it is), so I can use my oven to control the temperature range more precisely, and cook the shanks at an even lower temperature? Any other osso buco suggestions are also welcome.....

From: hunter12345
05-Dec-21
I just did my first attempt at red wine braised moose shank osso buco. I did them in my Dutch oven at 250 and it was about 7 hours before they were perfect. The result was amazing but I don’t think I’d want to be at under 250 on wild game or it might take days.

From: Dikndirt
05-Dec-21
I just did two different deer shanks, your crockpot should work fine, I had mine in a Dutch oven and cooked it on 225 after a serious browning in hot oil. Left them in for 7-8 hours. Turned out very good. I diced some celery stalks and onion in with the shanks and added a Thai sauce from Costco.

From: Medicinemann
05-Dec-21
Perfect. Just the kind of responses that I was hoping for.....

From: Ambush
05-Dec-21
I just did a couple large mule deer shanks, but got lazy and went boneless. Sliced 1 1/2" thick, browned, then it took just over six hours on low in the crockpot. I sometimes do the same with a string tied neck roast. Just slice 1 1/2" off the end. Same flavor.

From: bigeasygator
05-Dec-21
I wouldn’t worry about that being too high, Jake. If anything I would think it might be too low. Most of the osso buco recipes I’ve been looking at are cooked on the stovetop at a simmer. I would think you can get away with even the high setting on the crockpot and that might result in a more tender shank. For the record, the recipes I’ve been looking at are from Steve Rinella (Meateater) and Hank Shaw (Hunt, Gather, Cook website).

From: DanaC
06-Dec-21

DanaC's Link

From: timex
06-Dec-21
Had venison shank fajitas last night. 60 minutes in insta pot with an onion & big spoonful of better than bullion beef flavor. sautéed bell peppers & onion. Servid on toasted corn tortillas. Quick simple & delicious.

From: BIGRICH
06-Dec-21
Last year at grouse camp i did whole shanks off a whitetail in a large oval crockpot. Heavy brown in oil then braised for around 7 or 8 hours on high. They were fantastic and since has been a go to meal in the winter.

From: Ucsdryder
06-Dec-21
The key is to make sure you cook it long enough. In my experience you can’t overcook but if you undercook you’ll know it’

From: Ambush
06-Dec-21
I have to disagree with Ucsdryder on over cooking. At a certain point the meat starts to really shrivel which squeezes out moisture. That's been my experience anyway.

From: tobywon
06-Dec-21
You should be good Jake, I've done them in the crock pot that only had low or high settings. I used low and cooked all day. I know I may be in the minority here. I love the way the shank meat came out, tender and delicious, but I'm really not a big fan of the marrow or the gelatin-like texture when the connective tissue breaks down. The meat itself is fantastic. Good luck and report back as to how it came out and what you think.

From: loprofile
06-Dec-21
Cannot beat sous vide for shanks. 24 hours at 180 and falls of the bone and no gristle, tendons, or fat left

From: Medicinemann
06-Dec-21
I cooked it in a crock pot at the high setting (300 degrees) for 7 hours. Turned out great.

From: Cornpone
06-Dec-21
When it comes to crock pots all are not created equal. I had a crock pot...Rival I think...and gave it away because it didn't get hot enough. No matter what meat I had in it the result was tough. I checked it...180*. Then I bought a Crock Pot brand...it simmers which is essential. Now no matter what meat I cook it's done nice and tender. Mine is the large size oval crock. Then I bought a small quart and a half size, or so, for smaller meals...it simmers as well. Essential.

P.S. Osso buco is one of my favorites with deer shanks. Melt in your mouth perfect.

From: Ambush
06-Dec-21
Jake, I'm guessing you did bone in. Did you try the marrow?

Now I'm hungry!

From: Medicinemann
06-Dec-21
Yes and yes. I knew that it would be really good, and it was.

From: Ambush
06-Dec-21
Awesome! It's a pain to cut the bones, but sure seems worth it when you're finally eating them. Last ones I cut with a Sawzall when partly frozen. Just have to rinse the bone dust off.

From: Medicinemann
07-Dec-21
Exactly.....I used a brand new Sawzall blade on some shanks that I had JUST taken out of the freezer....it worked to perfection.

From: SIP
07-Dec-21
This is a recipe that i go back and forth on. Each time this thread pops up…i decide i am going to do it. I love the ingredients that are in the recipe. But my family doesnt so much, so i fear i will be left to eat it all by my lonesome and i bail on it. I do have a couple shanks vacuum sealed in the freezer from a couple years ago waiting to go through with it….i’m close to the edge, continue to sell me guys….

From: Stekewood
07-Dec-21
I would gladly eat it all by my lonesome but never get the chance! Everyone loves it.....

From: Medicinemann
07-Dec-21
SIP, PM sent

From: APauls
07-Dec-21
In my family there's only my wife, daughter and myself. My wife doesn't eat anything that isn't 100% pure meat. We still eat shanks. She gets a big enough chunk of meat out of it, and then my daughter and I pound the rest. It's always a single meal serving. I do it in the instant pot and the gravy out of there is soooooo flavourful.

From: Shug
07-Dec-21

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Shug's embedded Photo
Shug's embedded Photo
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Martha Stewart has a good YouTube video on bucco I’ve used it many times for venison shanks… delicious

From: Shug
07-Dec-21
Can’t find the video… I’m Sure someone more skilled could.

From: Shug
07-Dec-21
https://www.marthastewart.com/348630/osso-buco

From: ki-ke
07-Dec-21
Ok. Whole shanks or crosscut? And why?

From: Shug
07-Dec-21
Yes Steven…cross cut… osso bucco… means bone with a hole and the marrow from that hole is a delicacy..

I thought Neidelachelski was Italian

From: SIP
07-Dec-21
Sold. I have hank shaw’s buck buck moose, gonna do it. If not before, we are having a baby December 22 and for the first time have decided to hang home for a week versus going right back to work…..so i will have some time at home to be cooking some day coming up… Thanks guys

From: Yellowjacket
07-Dec-21
I'll join the chorus. I quit grinding shanks a couple of years ago. They all go in the slow cooker now.

I even save the other bones, particularly the knuckles and make bone broth in the instapot. Using your own gelatin rich bone broth will up your soup and stew game!

From: SIP
07-Dec-21
We made bone broth one year, was a fun project and it was cool using broth we made in recipes instead of store bought stuff. Great stuff for sure yellowjacket!

From: ki-ke
08-Dec-21
Shug- You filthy Italian.....Osso bucco can be prepared both ways. As whole shanks as well as cross cut. Matter of fact, I've NEVER seen OB prepared in a restaurant crosscut. Always whole shanks, whether lamb or pork.

As if you can speak Italian.....smh

From: midwest
08-Dec-21
"I thought Neidelachelski was Italian"

LMAO!!!

Okay, I'm going to try the crosscut version next time.

From: timex
08-Dec-21
Cross cut is what I do. The first thing that comes off the deer after the hide is the shanks slice the meat with knife then Sawzall in 3" sections

From: ki-ke
08-Dec-21
My goodness. I love you guys, but it’s like asking a bar full of blondes a simple question……

WHY crosscut, rather than whole? I spoke to Shug on the phone and he STILL couldn’t answer the question. He is a very good cook and I trust him, but I really want to know why crosscut, when every high end restaurant where I’ve ever ordered OB serves whole?

COME ON MAN!!!

From: MarkU
08-Dec-21
If you cross cut them, you don't have to beat the bones into splinters with a cave man rock hammer to get at the marrow.

From: RT
08-Dec-21
Likely because of the length of muscle fibers after it's cooked. It's not mush, it still has some structure.

From: Stekewood
08-Dec-21
"Ossobuco or osso buco is a specialty of Lombard cuisine of cross-cut veal shanks braised with vegetables, white wine and broth. It is often garnished with gremolata and traditionally served with either risotto alla milanese or polenta, depending on the regional variation." Wikipedia

From: Stekewood
08-Dec-21
I love braised shanks of any kind, and often make whole braised venison shanks but osobuco is cross cut by definition.

From: Ambush
08-Dec-21
I've done crosscut (1 1/2"), full length bone in and boneless. Definitely more flavor from cross cut. The marrow melds with the juices and flavors the meat, plus you can dig out the marrow.

From: tobywon
08-Dec-21
"Whats a matta you ki-ke” :) Traditional Italian OB is crosscut, don't argue with trad Italian, you won't win...at least in my family....haha. I know some will call whole shank OB as well, but as Shug mentioned OB does mean "bone with a hole" (osso "bone", buco "hole"). High end restaurants probably keep whole and call it OB so they can charge you more....lol. They can get more money saying "Osso buco" than "braised shank". Also as MarkU mentions, access to the marrow. Either way you have it, enjoy!!

From: ki-ke
08-Dec-21
Nice! Thanks for the wonderful info….

Paul! My mothers maiden name is Robustelli….once dad became Italian by injection, we never looked back….lol

From: Stekewood
08-Dec-21
Why do I have a feeling that the waiters at ki-ke’s high end restaurants recommend a nice Barefoot Chardonnay to go with those whole shank osso bucco plates?

From: timex
08-Dec-21
The only reason I do it is for the added bone marrow flavor. I'm not a fancy kinda guy mine get cooked in the insta pot. The stock gets saved & used all week long in other dishes.

From: ki-ke
08-Dec-21
Steke-

That’s a rugged wine pairing anywhere…..

From: Shug
08-Dec-21
Steve I guess I misunderstood your point…

From: Medicinemann
08-Dec-21
Ki-Ke, Ambush's last post nailed it. The marrow adds flavor to the meat. You won't get that if the bone isn't included.

From: walleyes
08-Dec-21
I just finished some venison shanks over the weekend. I cut the bones of right where the meat ended so the marrow would come out while cooking. Turned out fantastic!

From: walleyes
08-Dec-21

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walleyes's embedded Photo

From: walleyes
08-Dec-21

walleyes's embedded Photo
walleyes's embedded Photo

From: ki-ke
09-Dec-21
Walleye...That looks fantastic!!!

From: Stekewood
12-Dec-21

Stekewood's embedded Photo
Stekewood's embedded Photo
All this shank talk was motivational. This is the Meateater recipe with the Parmesan polenta. Top notch!

From: M.Pauls
13-Dec-21
I love shanks. I’ve got quite a few at the ready in the freezer. Unfortunately none are bone-in. Im dying to try real cross cut “osso buco”

From: Grey Ghost
13-Dec-21
Man, I don't know what cave I've been living in, but I've never had OB. It sounds delicious!

Matt

From: Medicinemann
13-Dec-21
Not only is it delicious, it is remarkably easy to prepare. The crock pot does most of the work. It is somewhat of a "set-it, and forget" type of meal. You can prepare it in rather elaborate fashion if you prefer (which takes more time, and requires more ingredients), but the actual preparation of the meat itself is straight forward, and very tasty......and MUCH better than just grinding or pitching the shanks.

From: Ambush
13-Dec-21
Jake, I'm afraid your exposure of The Shank as gourmet food is going to take the legs out from under a lot of deer and elk :)

I've never been a fan of grinding up shank, neck and other sinewy meat. Just means you have to spit smaller bits out of your burger or sausage. One of the reasons lots of non-game eaters don't like the packages some hunters give them to try.

From: Grey Ghost
13-Dec-21
I've always painstakingly trimmed all the sinew out of the shanks, so nothing but red meat went into the burger pile, but I'm not going to bother with that chore any more.

Matt

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